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July 2006

Windows Vista Voice Recognition Crashes and Burns

Filed under
Humor

What happens when a Microsoft employee demos the speech recognition in Windows Vista before it's ready? Check it out for yourselves. It's not a pretty sight. HERE.

Xandros 4 Home Edition Premium

Filed under
Reviews

It's been a while since I looked at Xandros. True to form, it has remained one of the easiest to use and flat out slickest Linux distributions available. This version of Xandros focuses on the "digital lifestyle" and includes wireless network profiles, a music manager with iPod & MP3 support, photo manager, video players and internet telephone via Skype, among other things.

Quake 4 1.3 released!

Filed under
Software
Gaming

This update includes a host of new and community requested features such as: more agile player movement, weapon balance adjustments, a single ambient light option, improved rendering and cpu peformance and much more. Also brand new elements are introduce to Quake 4:

Cedega and Linux: Let the Windows games begin

Filed under
Gaming

If there's one area where Linux distributions fall behind Windows, it's games. Most PC games are built for Windows. Where does that leave Linux users? With Cedega, a melding of Wine and DirectX developed by TransGaming. Today, Cedega 5.2.3 officially supports about 50 games, though in reality it can run a lot more.

Photoshop in Linux

Filed under
Linux

CAN you run Adobe Photoshop on Linux?

Many Web designers, graphic artists and bloggers might consider the answer to this question crucial when considering a shift from Windows.

Borrowing a PC? Put Linux on it, via a USB drive

Filed under
Linux

Have you ever had to use someone else's PC at work - either to complete a quick task, or as a substitute machine for a short period of time? The experience is never pleasant - foreign desktop settings, grimy keyboards, crazy font sizes and odd wallpaper - it's liken to borrowing someone's swim trunks. If you're a Linux desktop user and are forced to use someone's Windows machine, the experience may be more on par with borrowing a toothbrush.

Red Hat rains on Xen parade

Filed under
Linux

The Xen open-source virtualization environment is not yet ready for enterprise use, a senior Red Hat executive has said, despite "unbelievable" customer demand and the fact that Novell has already started shipping the software.

PCs for the Poor - As Good As Their Hype?

Filed under
OLPC

Technologists are at odds over how to bridge the digital divide. What one group calls the ultimate solution, another dismisses as "the scam of the century", reports Waleed al-Shobakky.

Defense Department Marches Towards Open Source

Filed under
OSS

In a new initiative to spur more use of open source software (OSS) within the US Defense Department, the department's Office of Advanced Systems and Concepts (AS&C) has begun teaming up with Red Hat, Novell, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, and AMD--along with big systems integrators and "non-traditional" open source companies--to glean insights that will help shorten the learning curve to deployment.

Mandriva 2007 Beta 1 released.

Filed under
OS

Mandriva 2007 Beta 1 is now available. Read the announcement here.
You can download a 5-cd x86_64 version (or 1-dvd) from here.

There are some known issues, as is typical usual with an early beta release ...

More in Tux Machines

Games: Fragment's Moonrise, Steam, Overcooked! 2 and Tropico 6

  • Fragment's Moonrise is a free Early Access open-world strategy game

    With some promising ideas that could be great when further developed, Fragment's Moonrise is a new open-world real-time strategy game out now in Early Access. It's a little weird but the basic idea is pretty interesting. You control groups like you would in a traditional RTS, or perhaps more like a real-time tactics game and then upgrade like in an RPG. The genre blending here is what's interesting, while you explore a randomly generated world each time.

  • Boiling Steam Does Steam Summer Sale 2020

    There are certain constants of summer for the Boiling Steam staff: heat, humidity, and of course the Steam Summer Sale. After all, nothing says the changing of seasons like a new Steam sale. Below are a few quick thoughts on some games we’ve picked up, as well as others we’ve played recently that we can recommend while they are on sale (until July 9th, 10am Pacific). SteamDB, IsThereAnyDeal, or CheapShark can help you figure out if the sale price is the best you can get.

  • The 2020 Steam Summer Sale ends soon, here's some final picks

    Stuck for what to pick up? With the huge Steam Summer Sale ending tomorrow at 5PM UTC, here's a little helping hand for you on what's good. I get why you might be stuck, with well over six thousand games on Steam alone that support Linux, it's easy to get completely swallowed up in the vast sea of games. Especially true if you're looking to pick up a game on sale, as there's close to five thousand of those discounted!

  • Suns Out, Buns Out is another awesome Overcooked! 2 update

    Get your fire extinguishers ready and try not to set your kitchen ablaze in the latest free content update to the co-op cooking game Overcooked! 2 with Suns Out, Buns Out. One of the absolute best co-op games on any platform, Overcooked! 2 just keeps on giving. While the base game is good and they have some fun DLC expansions, it's always nice to see some extra free content for everyone. In the Suns Out, Buns Out update which is out now you get more kitchens to play through, more recipes and a whole lot of fun.

  • Tropico 6 gets a few new features plus a Linux release on GOG

    Want to take on the role of El Presidente? Well if you've been holding out for a Linux release on GOG we've got good news, plus it continues to be updated. Tropico 6 was released back in March 2019 going onto receiving some pretty good reviews overall and I certainly enjoyed it (and quite a bit more than Tropico 5 too). Sadly the GOG release had been missing a Linux build but it seemed to get quietly rolled out towards the end of last month!

Btrfs in Next Fedora

  • Btrfs by default, the compression option

    Hi, The change proposal has a 'compression option' and we kinda need to get organized. https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Changes/BtrfsByDefault#Compression - Compression saves space, significantly reduces write amplification and therefore increases flash lifespan, and in some cases increases performance. - Desired but not a requirement of the change proposal. 1. Goal: probably the goal performance wise is to perform as good or better than now. Is it OK if there's a write time performance hit for a small percent of folks, for a high value target like usr that isn't updated that often, and is also updated out of band (offline updates typically, but also isn't something directly related to the daily workload)? How to decide this? 2. Benchmarking: this is hard. A simple tool for doing comparisons among algorithms on a specific bit of hardware is lzbench. https://github.com/inikep/lzbench How to compile on F32. https://github.com/inikep/lzbench/issues/69 But is that adequate? How do we confirm/deny on a wide variety of hardware that this meets the goal? And how is this test going to account for parallelization, and read ahead? Do we need a lot of data or is it adequate to get a sample "around the edges" (e.g. slow cpu fast drive; fast cpu slow drive; fast cpu fast drive; slow cpu slow drive). What algorithm? 3. Improvements and upgrades. We'll do plan A, but learn new things later, and come up with plan B. How do we get the plan A folks upgraded to plan B? Or just don't worry? 4. The whole file system (using a mount option) or curated (using an XATTR set on specific "high value" directories)? This part is elaborated below. A. do this with a mount option '-o compress=zstd:1' - dilemma: it doesn't always lead to equal or better performance. On some systems and workloads, write performance is slightly reduced. What about LZO? B. do this with per directory XATTR - dilemma: the target directories don't exist at install time, depending on whether the installation is rsync, rpm, or unsquashfs based. C. do the install with '-o compres=zstd', then set XATTR post-install - dilemma: the installed files won't have XATTR set, only new files inherit; does a 'dnf update' overwrite files and therefore the XATTR is not inherited, or are they new files and do inherit the XATTR? D. Which directories? Some may be outside of the installer's scope. /usr /var/lib/flatpak ~/.local/share/flatpak /var/lib/containers/ ~/.local/share/containers/ ~/.var ~/.cache (Plausible this list should be reversed. While compressing ~/.cache may not save much space, it's likely hammered with more changes than other locations, hence more benefit in terms of reducing write amplification.) For reference, the above is mostly from the description in the RFE bug attached to the feature's tracker bug. But I think it's best to have most discussion here and leave the bug for implementing+testing the implementation details. https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1851276 Thanks, -- Chris Murphy

  • Fedora Developers Evaluating Compression Options For Btrfs-By-Default Proposal

    The proposal for using Btrfs by default on the Fedora desktop is gaining a fair amount of traction and interest from the community and could possibly move ahead but further testing and decisions are still to be made. First of all, today marks a Fedora Btrfs test day for those wanting to help in evaluating this change proposal. Check it out if you have spare system(s) and interested in helping make the decision whether Fedora desktop spins should transition from EXT4 to Btrfs by default.

  • Btrfs to be the Default Filesystem on Fedora? Fedora 33 Starts Testing Btrfs Switch

    While we’re months away from Fedora’s next stable release (Fedora 33), there are a few changes worth keeping tabs on. Among all the other accepted system-wide changes for Fedora 33, the proposal of having Btrfs as the default filesystem for desktop variants is the most interesting one.

today's howtos

Btrfs Could be the Default Filesystem on Fedora Linux Starting With Fedora 33

If things go well, you’ll have Btrfs as the default filesystem on Fedora starting with the Fedora 33 release. Here are more details on this topic. Read more