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April 2006

GP2X 2.0.0 Firmware

Filed under
Gaming

The GP2X open-source Linux-based gaming handheld with a dash of SDL and some Star Truckers (which is one of the finest open-source games I've played in months) has a new firmware version 2.0.0 out.

Open enterprise: Schwartz doesn't get Linux

Filed under
Misc

Scott McNealy is out. Jonathan Schwartz is in. And the future never looked brighter for Sun Microsystems—or so we're told. But if Sun's new CEO is going to convince me that his company can remain a dominant player in enterprise software, first he's going to have to get his story straight, particularly when it comes to Linux and open source.

Also: Interview with Jonathan Schwartz

Firefox 1.5.0.4 download location

Filed under
Moz/FF

I again point you to a new version of firefox before it becomes official. The version installed without problem over 1.5.0.2, all extensions that I have installed are still working.

X2: The Threat has gone gold

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Game Publishing just announced that their port of Egosoft's space simulation X2: The Threat has gone gold!

Also: Quetoo 0.3.4 has been released

mount --bind

Filed under
HowTos

One problem with symbolic links is that really they are just files. A special kind of file, yes, but a symlink only points at a directory - it doesn't act like one. So, for example, if you put a symlink to /xyz in a users home directory, and the user has write permission to his home (as he ordinarily would), he can remove your symlink. Nothing you can do with ordinary permissions can prevent that.

Xen in action: Deploying multiple servers

Filed under
Software

This article briefly examines the current state of affairs for multiple server deployment, with an emphasis on modern advancements in virtual servers and workstations. The most common configurations use three primary techniques: Partition, Emulate and Virtualize.

Setting a working directory for an app

Filed under
HowTos

A reader asked a hint for setting a a working directory for applications launched with WINE, because... "Some Windows programs require the setting of a working directory when the program is started."

Linux is not 'free' - it just works well

Filed under
Linux

The compelling reason for Linux's successful incubation and adoption is quite simple: it works for us. Linux meets two key requirements of technically mature enterprise consumers - reliability and portability.

Restoring Files From an Amanda Tape Backup

Filed under
HowTos

I've used the University of Maryland's open source Amanda tape backup system for some time now. There is some documentation on restoring entire disks or partitions with Amanda, but restoring individual files from tape or image file wasn't that intuitive, so I thought I'd share my experiences.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The community-led renaissance of open source

With few commercial participants, early free software and open source communities were, by definition, community-led. Software was designed and created organically by communities of users in response to their needs and inspiration. The results, to a degree nobody predicted, were often magical. First-generation open source businesses like Red Hat emerged to respond to these needs. They combined the best of both worlds: the flexibility and control of raw open source with the commercial support that enterprises depend on. These new open source businesses found their opportunity by adding the missing—but necessary—commercial services to community-led open source projects. These services would be costly for organizations to provide on their own and potentially even more costly to do without. One early leader of that era, Cygnus Solutions, even adopted the counter-intuitive tagline "Making free software affordable." But back then, it was always overwhelmingly clear: The commercial vendors were in service of the community, filling in around the edges to enable commercial applications. The community was the star, and the companies were the supporting cast. Read more

Election fraud: Is there an open source solution?

Can open source technology help keep our elections honest? With its Trust The Vote Project, the Open Source Election Technology (OSET) Institute is working on making that a reality for elections in the United States and around the world. The project is developing an open, adaptable, flexible, full-featured, and innovative elections technology platform called ElectOS. It will support all aspects of elections administration and voting, including creating, marking, casting, and counting ballots and managing all back-office functions. The software is freely available under an Open Source Initiative (OSI)-recognized public license for adoption, adaptation, and deployment by anyone, including elections jurisdictions directly or, more commonly, commercial vendors or systems integrators. Read more

Meld is an excellent file and folder comparison tool for Windows and Linux

Ever had two sets of the same files and folders and couldn't decide which one to retain? It may take a long time to actually open each to verify the one that's recent or the one you need; while dates associated with the files may help, they won't all the time as they don't tell you anything about the actual content. This is where file comparison tools can be time-savers. Meld is an open source file comparison tool for Windows and Linux for exactly that purpose. Read more