Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

January 2006

Google? Linux? Goobuntu? Boulderdash!

Filed under
Google

According to reports, there will be a "Ubuntu desktop Linux distribution, based on Debian and the Gnome desktop, it is known internally as 'Goobuntu.'" King goes on to state, "Google has confirmed it is working on a desktop linux project."

I wish I could buy this report, but I can't.

Mozilla Reborn: SeaMonkey 1.0 Is Released

Filed under
Moz/FF

While Firefox and Thunderbird are the poster children of open-source Internet application success, the program suite they sprang from, Mozilla, was reborn Jan. 30 under a new name: SeaMonkey.

Massachusetts Names New CIO

Filed under
OSS

The state of Massachusetts has found a new chief information officer, putting Louis Gutierrez in the hot seat as the government continues its push toward adopting the OpenDocument Format (ODF).

UK Linux guru backs GPL 3

Filed under
OSS

Linus Torvalds may have his doubts, but Alan Cox is supporting the next version of the GPL. Cox told ZDNet UK that he thinks many of the changes in GPL 3 are sound.

Launch of SpreadKDE.org Promotional Community Site

Filed under
KDE

The KDE marketing group is pleased to announce the release of SpreadKDE.org, the new home for KDE's promotional activities.

Do you know someone who knows someone?

Filed under
KDE

Do you know someone or someone who knows someone that works somewhere deserves recognition for their work with KDE. We've been interviewing individuals for some time now, but what about the associated organizations? Do you know someone to nominate?

My desktop OS: Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

A few months ago I selected Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger) as the new operating system on the Acer TravelMate T290LMI notebook I use at home and for work. In past years I tried other Linux distributions and always returned to Windows. Now I'm sticking with Ubuntu, but I haven't been able to give up Windows altogether yet.

Novell targets the SMB market with partnerships

Filed under
SUSE

On January 30th, Novell Inc. announced that it will start bundling support and training offerings with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for small and medium-sized businesses via its channel partners.

This news came only days after Novell announced that, as of March 1st, the Linux company will no longer force users into CLAs.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • How my students taught me to code

    "Hello, I'm Miss Jess, and my students taught me how to code." When I say this to new students, they often think I misspoke. But it's true. Coding always interested me, but it seemed inaccessible. Then my students taught me to code a video game during a few lunch breaks. Their encouraging advice and suggestions helped me create my first video game using Scratch. The game was simple. It was about a monkey catching bananas as they fell from the sky. If you caught a ripe banana, you earned points.

  • ssh-copy-id: call for testing

    After a prolonged period of neglect, I've finally got round to putting the various patches I had laying around into some sort of order, and pushing them somewhere public, so it would be great if people could test them.

    There are two branches that I'd like people to try:

    https://gitlab.com/phil_hands/ssh-copy-id/-/tree/main

    and

    https://gitlab.com/phil_hands/ssh-copy-id/-/tree/bug/3201

  • How to rename columns in Pandas Dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover various methods to rename columns in pandas dataframe in Python. Renaming or changing the names of columns is one of the most common data wrangling task. If you are not from programming background and worked only in Excel Spreadsheets in the past you might feel it not so easy doing this in Python as you can easily rename columns in MS Excel by just typing in the cell what you want to have. If you are from database background it is similar to ALIAS in SQL. In Python there is a popular data manipulation package called pandas which simplifies doing these kind of data operations.

  • How to use Ansible to update your Django web app

    Now, as you have overcome or evaded the reefs, shoals and swirls of initial development and deployment and your appetite grows, you ask “How do I automate the update and restart of my web app when I change the code?” There is already one simple and elegant method on our blog, that uses one of the possible push to publish methods, but this time we will dip our toes into vast waters of Ansible automation. You may think that using Ansible for a simple task like this is overkill, and it’s a valid thought, but our example is a good practice case that introduces multiple elements that can be used later for much bigger projects. That’s why, instead of writing a simple bash or python script, we will build a full Ansible playbook with accompanying configuration.

  • Popular Python Libraries for Data Science, Machine Learning and More
  • Using bash’s shopt builtin to manage Linux shell behavior

    If you haven’t tried it yet, you might be surprised by the many features of shopt. While it works like a Linux command, it’s actually a bash shell builtin that allows you to change many things about that shell’s behavior. One option, for example, allows the shell to fix minor typos when you type directory names. To demonstrate, in the first cd command shown below, the directory name, bin, is typed with an extra letter and the shell complains and gives up:

Security and Tor

  • Find security issues in Go code using gosec

    It's extremely common now to encounter code written in the Go programming language, especially if you are working with containers, Kubernetes, or a cloud ecosystem. Docker was one of the first projects to adopt Golang, Kubernetes followed, and many new projects select Go over other programming languages. Like any other language, Go has its share of strengths and weaknesses, which include security flaws. These can arise due to issues in the programming language itself coupled with insecure coding practices, such as memory safety issues in C code, for example. Regardless of why they occur, security issues need to be fixed early in development to prevent them from creeping into shipped software. Fortunately, static analysis tools are available to help you tackle these issues in a more repeatable manner. Static analysis tools work by parsing source code written in a programming language and looking for issues.

  • NXLog Enterprise Edition 5.1: Providing capabilities to further harden enterprises’ security

    NXLog announces the first minor release in the new major version of NXLog Enterprise Edition, NXLog Enterprise Edition version 5.1 (EE 5.1). Even though it is a minor release, it is very significant, because along with EE 5.0, NXLog is now filling its new passive network monitoring module with additional protocol parsers focused on Industrial Control Systems.

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10

    The new shiny Tor Browser 10 for Desktop is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory!

    Android Tor Browser 10 is under active development and we are supporting the current 9.5 series for Android until the new one is ready. We are informed by Mozilla of any issues they learn about affecting the 9.5 series. We expect to release the new Tor Browser for Android based on Fenix in the following weeks.

  • New Release: Tails 4.10

Android Leftovers

Feature Requests, Submit Requests for openSUSE Jump Take Shape

The openSUSE Project is progressing with the state of openSUSE Jump, which is the interim name given to the experimental distribution in the Open Build Service. openSUSE Leap Release Manager Lubos Kocman sent an email to the project titled “Update on Jump and Leap 15.3 and proposed roadmap for the next steps” that explains the progress that has been made with Jump 15.2.1. “We have some exciting news to share about the openSUSE Jump effort!” Kocman wrote. “We will have a Jira partner setup (coming) for openSUSE this week!” Access to Jira will allow openSUSE Leap contributors to see updates on community feature requests and be able to comment on requested information or allow them to request information. The process will be tested initially by one of the community members to see if it works properly. Read more