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December 2005

Stx 1.0rc3 - An update

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Stx released a new release candidate a few days back and just in time for my dying harddrive. Fortunately I received a new bigger harddrive for Christmas. ...unfortunately, I hadn't copied all of my partitions/installs to it before it completely gave up the ghost last night. Another good thing tho, I already had stx-1.0-rc3.iso sitting on my gentoo desktop (that I did ghost over the first day of installing said new hardware). So, this morning I installed stx-1.0-rc3 and figured why waste the experience. Here's a little update since our last look.

Ubuntu for AMD64 not 'there' yet

Filed under
Reviews

I sadly have to report that I'm not pleased with what I've seen. I'm not a linux expert, just a techie that has run several linux flavours over the years, and I know that there must be plenty of happy Ubuntu users out there, but I can't imagine how one of the most popular linux distros, in its latest release, is unable to get Mozilla Suite, or the Adobe Reader 7.01 for Linux installed...

BeleniX LiveCD v0.3 Screenshots

Filed under
OS

BeleniX is a *NIX distribution that is built using the OpenSolaris source base. It is currently a live CD but is intended to grow into a complete distribution that can be installed to hard disk. BeleniX is developed at the India Engineering Centre of Sun Microsystems in Bangalore, the silicon capital of India.

Embedding Python in Your C Programs

Filed under
HowTos

C, meet Python. Python, this is C. With surprisingly little effort, the Python interpreter can be integrated into your program to add features quickly that could take months if written entirely in C.

Reason 373 to dump Windows: the WMF Flaw

Filed under
Security

Why should you dump Windows for Linux?

Well, there's Microsoft's security-hole-of-the-month-club, which far too many people have got compliants about.

And then there's the WMF (Windows Metafile Format) hole.

This may turn out to be the root cause of the worst Windows security problem ever.

Linux Today: The Top 10 Stories for 2005

Filed under
Misc

Being the publication we are, it is inevitable that we will choose to reflect on what happened with Linux in 2005. Specifically, what stories were the most read by you, the reader? What grabbed your attention? On what issues did you hold the strongest opinions?

Giving Linux and open source the benefit of the doubt

Filed under
OSS

The funny thing is we expect more out of Linux and open source apps than we do from Microsoft products. I never expect Linux machines to go down, Apache to crash, or desktops to be under virus threat, and I sure don't worry about excessive licensing fees.

MySQL vs. the Lite Databases: A Fair Comparison?

Filed under
Software

Not to pick on MySQL or anything, but does it really makes sense to compare it to the light versions of proprietary databases? I thought not, but MySQL users say I'm all wet.

Windows 0-Day Exploit Helped by Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

So is Metasploit helping to spread the zero day outbreak, or is it helping security professionals to protect against it? The answer depends.

Intel Drops Logo After 37 Years

Filed under
Hardware

Intel Corp., whose marketing made its computer chips a household name, is changing its logo for the first time in 37 years.

More in Tux Machines

KDE neon 5.17

KDE neon 5.17 is out. You can upgrade your existing KDE neon User Edition install or install fresh from an ISO image or run the Docker image. Featuring Plasma 5.17 it is packed full of new features according to OMG Ubuntu. Read more

Games: The Universim, POSTAL 4: No Regerts, RPCS3, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Games Archive and X-Plane

  • City building god sim 'The Universim' will now let you launch rockets with satellites into orbit

    The Universim is slowly turning into a city building god game truly worth playing, with the Sky High update now available expanding the game into planetary orbit. Being able to actually launch things into space is a stepping stone towards visiting other planets. Currently, the Cosmodrome will allow you to send up Defence Satellites that will enable ground to air defences for your Defence Towers. So now you have a reasonable chance to take down meteors and other threats from space.

  • POSTAL 4: No Regerts released into Early Access, Linux version likely in future

    Running With Scissors are back, with a surprise release of POSTAL 4: No Regerts on Steam and a Linux version is looking likely in future. Naturally, someone posted on Steam to ask about the possibility of Linux support. This is something that happens a lot but here it's a bit different. RWS already supported Linux with multiple previous Postal releases.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 is coming along quickly with their August progress report up

    Delayed as usual due to the progress reports being done by contributors, the team working on the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 have another post up to show off more incredible progress. To start with, they have again changed how they list what games are playable and not with the removal of games that won't work due to servers being shut down. They said even if RPCS3 becomes 100% complete, they wouldn't work unless someone accurately emulated and hosted servers for them. With that in mind, they also did a lot of testing of games that previously only went in-game to see how many are now properly playable. Thanks to all the testing, the Playable category has jumped up to 1,426 titles!

  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition arrives on Linux on November 5th

    Feral Interactive have finally confirmed the Linux release date for Shadow of the Tomb Raider after announcing it for Linux back in November last year. They've said today it will officially release as "Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition" on November 5th! Looking around at dates, technically this is the earliest we've seen any of the newer Tomb Raider series arrive on Linux. The first Tomb Raider came to Linux in 2016 after an original 2013 release, with Rise of the Tomb Raider arriving on Linux 2018 after an original 2016 release and we get the final game in the reboot trilogy next month!

  • The Internet Archive website has added another 2,500 MS-DOS games

    Another point scored for game preservation. The Internet Archive have added another 2,500 MS-DOS games you can play right in your browser. In their official announcement, they said that while they've added a few more to their collection here and there this is the biggest yet and it ranges from "tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago".

  • 2,500 More MS-DOS Games Playable at the Archive

    Another few thousand DOS Games are playable at the Internet Archive! Since our initial announcement in 2015, we’ve added occasional new games here and there to the collection, but this will be our biggest update yet, ranging from tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago.

  • Vulkan support is not far away now for the flight sim X-Plane 11, physics & flight model updates coming

    X-Plane 11, the detailed flight simulator is finally closing in on an update that will bring in Vulkan support as detailed in a new developer blog post.

7 Linux Applications You Should Start Using Right Now

Linux used to be the go-to operating system among the tech-savvy crowd. Because back in the day, it was a lot more demanding to use. Now Linux has modern, user-friendly distributions such as Ubuntu and Mint. The application repository they have in common has matured too. Customizing it to your heart’s desire is now easier than ever before. And this should be the end goal — to mold the OS into a tool that’s custom-tailored to your needs. So if you haven’t already, consider installing the following types of applications. Read more

Firefox’s New WebSocket Inspector

The Firefox DevTools team and our contributors were hard at work over the summer, getting Firefox 70 jam-packed with improvements. We are especially excited about our new WebSocket inspection feature, because you told us in feedback how important it would be for your daily work. To use the inspector now, download Firefox Developer Edition, open DevTools’ Network panel to find the Messages tab. Then, keep reading to learn more about WebSockets and the tricks that the new panel has up its sleeve. But first, big thanks to Heng Yeow Tan, the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) student who’s responsible for the implementation. Read more