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October 2005

OSBC - Open source 2.0: New kids on the block

Filed under
OSS

Remember a year or so ago when you could probably name most of the open-source companies in the market? Try doing that now when the number of startups has skyrocketed to several hundred.

Linux Kernel 2.6.14 Released

Filed under
Linux

2.6.14 was delayed twice due to some last-minute bug-reports, some of which ended up being false alarms, got us to look at the code and fix some other bugs instead. So it's all good.

M$ threatens to withdraw Windows in S.Korea

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp. has threatened to withdraw its Windows software from South Korea if the country's antitrust agency orders it to unbundle its Instant Messenger and Media Player from the operating system.

Mobile Linux computing coding contest underway

Filed under
Linux

A contest to create applications and find bugs in a mobile "Linux desktop server" is underway. Realm Systems will award $50,000 for the best of show.

Where do business decisions end and blackmail begin?

Filed under
Linux

Microsoft is again, treading on thin ice. It may just give way this time. The weight of this pending action may prove to be too much.

Azureus: A Better Way to BitTorrent

Filed under
Software

BitTorrent has become one of the most widely used apps on the Internet — so popular, in fact, that it’s estimated that over 33% of all Internet traffic is now generated by BitTorrent. 33%!

The vendor mafia's Linux vendetta

Filed under
Linux

For all the arguments against Microsoft and its anti-competitive practices, the one thing that really holds Linux back is the complete, embarrassing and possibly negligent support for it by vendors.

Run With The Big Dogs On Chubby Puppy Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Chubby Puppy Linux "fills out" the regular Puppy Linux release with the addition of the OpenOffice.org suite of applications. It's a full figured Linux version in a fast, lightweight liveCD package.

Novell missteps not affecting SuSE

Filed under
SUSE

Novell layoff rumors swirled this week, but analysts were quick to dismiss any doomsday scenarios involving the SuSE Linux operating system.

More in Tux Machines

Events and Communities: SUSE, Ubuntu and WordPress

  • Join Us at the Open Source Summit Europe

    The Open Source Summit Europe, a premier open source events hosted by The Linux Foundation, will take place October 28-30 in Lyon, France at the Lyon Convention Centre. It is the leading conference for developers, architects, and other technologists – as well as open source community and industry leaders – to collaborate, share information, learn about the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions. Over 2,000 attendees are expected to gather for Open Source Summit Europe this year.

  • Join SUSE, AWS, SAP and Lemongrass in Sydney for a half-day workshop
  • Grace Hopper Conference 2019

    We are so excited about what just happened that we felt we should tell everyone about it! A group of 24 of us at Canonical from various teams including sales, HR and engineering, attended the Grace Hopper Celebration in Orlando, Florida. This year, it was an epic gathering of more than 26,000 people from all over the globe interested in tech. Despite its start as women’s work, the tech industry has gained a reputation of being dominated by and mostly suited for men. In reality, this only made the Grace Hopper conference feel more impactful, especially knowing that in its very first edition in 1994, only 500 women were present at the event. The Grace Hopper Conference was an awesome celebration of women; diverse, multi-talented, and deeply skilled! Both women and men, mostly students, interested in everything from security to machine learning came by the Canonical booth to hear about Ubuntu. We brought along an Orange box so we could demo MaaS, Openstack, and other incredible technologies happening on Ubuntu at Canonical.

  • Ubucon Europe 2019 | Sintra edition [Ed: Not English, but lots of photos here]
  • Responsible Participation In Online Communities

    In our first article in this series, we highlighted the WordPress mission to democratize publishing. WordPress introduced a tool to independent and small publishers who did not have the resources of the larger publishing platforms. Access to a free content management system to create websites has empowered thousands of people to find their voice online. People have been able to share their enthusiasm for hobbies, causes, products and much more. Through these different voices, we can encourage understanding, spark creativity, and create environments where collaboration can happen. But as we build more digital communities, it’s easy to forget that online safety is a group effort.

Project Trident 2020 OS Migration

After several months of examination and testing of the various operating systems that are available right now, we have reached a conclusion. Project Trident will rebasing with Void Linux. Read more Also: Project Trident Switching From TrueOS/FreeBSD Distribution To Basing On Void Linux

GNU Debugger and the FSF Coup

  • Installing Gerrit and Keycloak for GDB

    Back in September, we had the GNU Tools Cauldron in the gorgeous city of Montréal (perhaps I should write a post specifically about it...). One of the sessions we had was the GDB BoF, where we discussed, among other things, how to improve our patch review system. I have my own personal opinions about the current review system we use (mailing list-based, in a nutshell), and I haven't felt very confident to express it during the discussion. Anyway, the outcome was that at least 3 global maintainers have used or are currently using the Gerrit Code Review system for other projects, are happy with it, and that we should give it a try. Then, when it was time to decide who wanted to configure and set things up for the community, I volunteered. Hey, I'm already running the Buildbot master for GDB, what is the problem to manage yet another service? Oh, well. Before we dive into the details involved in configuring and running gerrit in a machine, let me first say that I don't totally support the idea of migrating from mailing list to gerrit. I volunteered to set things up because I felt the community (or at least the its most active members) wanted to try it out. I don't necessarily agree with the choice. Ah, and I'm writing this post mostly because I want to be able to close the 300+ tabs I had to open on my Firefox during these last weeks, when I was searching how to solve the myriad of problems I faced during the set up!

  • Bradley M. Kuhn: On Recent Controversial Events

    The last 33 days have been unprecedentedly difficult for the software freedom community and for me personally. Folks have been emailing, phoning, texting, tagging me on social media (— the last of which has been funny, because all my social media accounts are placeholder accounts). But, just about everyone has urged me to comment on the serious issues that the software freedom community now faces. Until now, I have stayed silent regarding all these current topics: from Richard M. Stallman (RMS)'s public statements, to his resignation from the Free Software Foundation (FSF), to the Epstein scandal and its connection to MIT. I've also avoided generally commenting on software freedom organization governance during this period. I did this for good reason, which is explained below. However, in this blog post, I now share my primary comments on the matters that seem to currently be of the utmost attention of the Open Source and Free Software communities. I have been silent the last month because, until two days ago, I was an at-large member of FSF's Board of Directors, and a Voting Member of the FSF. As a member of FSF's two leadership bodies, I was abiding by a reasonable request from the FSF management and my duty to the organization. Specifically, the FSF asked that all communication during the crisis come directly from FSF officers and not from at-large directors and/or Voting Members. Furthermore, the FSF management asked all Directors and Voting Members to remain silent on this entire matter — even on issues only tangentially related to the current situation, and even when speaking in our own capacity (e.g., on our own blogs like this one). The FSF is an important organization, and I take any request from the FSF seriously — so I abided fully with their request. The situation was further complicated because folks at my employer, Software Freedom Conservancy (where I also serve on the Board of Directors) had strong opinions about this matter as well. Fortunately, the FSF and Conservancy both had already created clear protocols for what I should do if ever there was a disagreement or divergence of views between Conservancy and FSF. I therefore was recused fully from the planning, drafting, and timing of Conservancy's statement on this matter. I thank my colleagues at the Conservancy for working so carefully to keep me entirely outside the loop on their statement and to diligently assure that it was straight-forward for me to manage any potential organizational disagreements. I also thank those at the FSF who outlined clear protocols (ahead of time, back in March 2019) in case a situation like this ever came up. I also know my colleagues at Conservancy care deeply, as I do, about the health and welfare of the FSF and its mission of fighting for universal software freedom for all. None of us want, nor have, any substantive disagreement over software freedom issues. I take very seriously my duty to the various organizations where I have (or have had) affiliations. More generally, I champion non-profit organizational transparency. Unfortunately, the current crisis left me in a quandary between the overarching goal of community transparency and abiding by FSF management's directives. Now that I've left the FSF Board of Directors, FSF's Voting Membership, and all my FSF volunteer roles (which ends my 22-year uninterrupted affiliation with the FSF), I can now comment on the substantive issues that face not just the FSF, but the Free Software community as a whole, while continuing to adhere to my past duty of acting in FSF's best interest. In other words, my affiliation with the FSF has come to an end for many good and useful reasons. The end to this affiliation allows me to speak directly about the core issues at the heart of the community's current crisis.

  • Meet the FSF staff in Raleigh, NC on October 15

    On Tuesday, October 15th, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) staff would like to meet you at a social event at Raleigh's Whiskey Kitchen! Executive director John Sullivan, licensing and compliance manager Donald R. Robertson, III, copyright and licensing associate Craig Topham, and program manager Zoë Kooyman, will all be in Raleigh, NC on October 15th, in anticipation of this year's licensing seminar on GPL Enforcement and Legal Ethics. We look forward to hosting this informal meetup to show our appreciation for your support of the FSF's work. We'll share some bites and drinks while giving you the opportunity to meet other FSF associate members and supporters while learning about what the FSF is currently working on. We are curious to hear your thoughts, and would love to answer any questions you may have.

Mozilla: Firefox, Monitor and Search Engine Add-ons

  • has google won the browser wars? – should Mozilla build their own SmartPhones?

    on the desktop: one refuses to believe it. on mobile: should Mozilla start building their own SmartPhone and ship Firefox.apk per default?

  • Why you should review your credit report after a data breach

    When significant data breaches happen where high risk data is at stake, there’s often a lot of talk about credit reports. Some companies that have been hacked may even be required to provide credit monitoring to their customers as part of their breach notification requirements. Whether the breached company provides credit monitoring or not, security experts recommend you check your credit reports for suspicious activity. To protect your identity, they also recommend you freeze your credit. Here’s what that means and why it’s important.

  • Search Engine add-ons to be removed from addons.mozilla.org

    For the last eleven years, Firefox Search Engine add-ons have been powered by OpenSearch. With the recent implementation of the search overrides API, a WebExtensions API that offers users more controls for opting into changes, Mozilla intends to deprecate OpenSearch and eventually remove it from Firefox. Search Engine add-ons will be removed from AMO on December 5, 2019.