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August 2005

Freespire changes name, Linspire goes free (as in beer) for a time

Filed under
Linux

In a short story with a happy ending, the developer of a "free" version of Linspire called Freespire has agreed to change the name of his project, and Linspire Inc. is offering free copies of Linspire Linux "for a few days."

Linux And Windows Square Off In Another Round Of TCO Testing

Filed under
OS

Just as the debate over whether Linux or Windows is cheaper to deploy and manage was threatening to become old hat, IBM on Wednesday fired the latest salvo by promoting two reports it sponsored.

States expand push for sales taxes on Internet purchases

Filed under
Misc

Come this fall, 13 states will start encouraging — though not demanding — that online businesses collect sales taxes just as Main Street stores are required to do.

Apple OS X runs just fine on AMD CPUs

Filed under
Mac

First, this is not the VMWare hack, it was installed on the notebook, so presumably the source has access to a legit copy of the OS. Next, it supposedly installed without a hitch, and everything down to the wireless card worked like a charm. Lastly, it was an AMD64 model, from the look of it, and it is most likely this one.

Linux trademark letter result pleases lawyer

Filed under
Linux

A lawyer acting on behalf of Linus Torvalds has hailed as "favourable" the fact one in nine Australian vendors targeted by a letter campaign asking them to relinquish any legal claim to the 'Linux' name have agreed to do so.

Supersizing the supercomputers: What's next?

Filed under
Hardware

Supercomputers excel at highly calculation-intensive tasks, yet supercomputers themselves are subject to technological advancements and redesigns that allow them to keep pace with the science they support.

Korea Post to Adopt Linux

Filed under
Linux

Korea's postal service agency, Wednesday announced it will begin adopting the free, open-source operating system known as Linux to its desktop computers.

Regulating phone companies' security standards

Filed under
Security

A new age crime for new age technology, is about thieves trying to steal identities and the phone companies doing little to protect subscribers' personal data from being revealed.

Serial ATA vs. Parallel IDE

Filed under
Hardware

Over the past few years SATA has become a standard interface on hard drives and is starting to show up in many peripheral devices. Today we're taking a look at two similar hard drives to see how well SATA is supported in Linux.

Five mistakes GNU/Linux neophytes make

Filed under
Linux

New users tend to make some common mistakes when trying out GNU/Linux for the first time. The reasons for these mistakes are varied. Here are some solutions to five commonly encountered GNU/Linux problems.

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Qt Creator 4.12.4 released

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.12.4 ! In this release of Qt Creator we fixed C++ debugging on iOS devices, and adapted MCU support to the new Qt for MCU 1.3 release. Have a look at our change log for a more complete list of improvements. The opensource version is available on the Qt download page under "Qt Creator", and you find commercially licensed packages on the Qt Account Portal. Qt Creator 4.12.4 is also available as an update in the online installer. Please post issues in our bug tracker. You can also find us on IRC on #qt-creator on chat.freenode.net, and on the Qt Creator mailing list. Read more

AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC – Running Linux – Week 1

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Android Leftovers