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August 2005

Freespire changes name, Linspire goes free (as in beer) for a time

Filed under
Linux

In a short story with a happy ending, the developer of a "free" version of Linspire called Freespire has agreed to change the name of his project, and Linspire Inc. is offering free copies of Linspire Linux "for a few days."

Linux And Windows Square Off In Another Round Of TCO Testing

Filed under
OS

Just as the debate over whether Linux or Windows is cheaper to deploy and manage was threatening to become old hat, IBM on Wednesday fired the latest salvo by promoting two reports it sponsored.

States expand push for sales taxes on Internet purchases

Filed under
Misc

Come this fall, 13 states will start encouraging — though not demanding — that online businesses collect sales taxes just as Main Street stores are required to do.

Apple OS X runs just fine on AMD CPUs

Filed under
Mac

First, this is not the VMWare hack, it was installed on the notebook, so presumably the source has access to a legit copy of the OS. Next, it supposedly installed without a hitch, and everything down to the wireless card worked like a charm. Lastly, it was an AMD64 model, from the look of it, and it is most likely this one.

Linux trademark letter result pleases lawyer

Filed under
Linux

A lawyer acting on behalf of Linus Torvalds has hailed as "favourable" the fact one in nine Australian vendors targeted by a letter campaign asking them to relinquish any legal claim to the 'Linux' name have agreed to do so.

Supersizing the supercomputers: What's next?

Filed under
Hardware

Supercomputers excel at highly calculation-intensive tasks, yet supercomputers themselves are subject to technological advancements and redesigns that allow them to keep pace with the science they support.

Korea Post to Adopt Linux

Filed under
Linux

Korea's postal service agency, Wednesday announced it will begin adopting the free, open-source operating system known as Linux to its desktop computers.

Regulating phone companies' security standards

Filed under
Security

A new age crime for new age technology, is about thieves trying to steal identities and the phone companies doing little to protect subscribers' personal data from being revealed.

Serial ATA vs. Parallel IDE

Filed under
Hardware

Over the past few years SATA has become a standard interface on hard drives and is starting to show up in many peripheral devices. Today we're taking a look at two similar hard drives to see how well SATA is supported in Linux.

Five mistakes GNU/Linux neophytes make

Filed under
Linux

New users tend to make some common mistakes when trying out GNU/Linux for the first time. The reasons for these mistakes are varied. Here are some solutions to five commonly encountered GNU/Linux problems.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The community-led renaissance of open source

With few commercial participants, early free software and open source communities were, by definition, community-led. Software was designed and created organically by communities of users in response to their needs and inspiration. The results, to a degree nobody predicted, were often magical. First-generation open source businesses like Red Hat emerged to respond to these needs. They combined the best of both worlds: the flexibility and control of raw open source with the commercial support that enterprises depend on. These new open source businesses found their opportunity by adding the missing—but necessary—commercial services to community-led open source projects. These services would be costly for organizations to provide on their own and potentially even more costly to do without. One early leader of that era, Cygnus Solutions, even adopted the counter-intuitive tagline "Making free software affordable." But back then, it was always overwhelmingly clear: The commercial vendors were in service of the community, filling in around the edges to enable commercial applications. The community was the star, and the companies were the supporting cast. Read more

Election fraud: Is there an open source solution?

Can open source technology help keep our elections honest? With its Trust The Vote Project, the Open Source Election Technology (OSET) Institute is working on making that a reality for elections in the United States and around the world. The project is developing an open, adaptable, flexible, full-featured, and innovative elections technology platform called ElectOS. It will support all aspects of elections administration and voting, including creating, marking, casting, and counting ballots and managing all back-office functions. The software is freely available under an Open Source Initiative (OSI)-recognized public license for adoption, adaptation, and deployment by anyone, including elections jurisdictions directly or, more commonly, commercial vendors or systems integrators. Read more

Meld is an excellent file and folder comparison tool for Windows and Linux

Ever had two sets of the same files and folders and couldn't decide which one to retain? It may take a long time to actually open each to verify the one that's recent or the one you need; while dates associated with the files may help, they won't all the time as they don't tell you anything about the actual content. This is where file comparison tools can be time-savers. Meld is an open source file comparison tool for Windows and Linux for exactly that purpose. Read more