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June 2005

KDE Announces the 24 Google Projects

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Project and Google announce the 24 KDE projects selected for the "Summer of Code" project. The lucky students and the KDE e.V. will receive a total of $120,000 if they can complete their projects in the allotted two months.

Yikes! Mad Cow Cover-Up?

Dr. Lester Friedlander, a former USDA vet, said that inspectors are allowed only 15 seconds of inspection and that unhygenic practices are common in the meat industry; practices such as cow carcass abscesses being hosed off, wrapped up and shipped to the consumer. He also states that some supervisors were more concerned about falsifying inspection documents than protecting consumers.

XP Starter under the gun

Filed under
Microsoft

Even as Microsoft's low-cost version of Windows reaches more corners of the globe, some analysts are wondering whether it is hitting the mark.

IBM to Apple: Watt Me Worry?

Filed under
Mac

Apple said earlier this month that it will switch to Intel chips from PowerPC chips as IBM's future PowerPC processors' projected power consumption will make them too difficult to design into future Apple systems. But IBM begs to differ.

Tom Cruise admits to alien belief

Filed under
Movies

Actor Tom Cruise has admitted that he believes in aliens, saying it would be "arrogant" to think that extra-terrestrial beings did not exist.

AMD Leaves Lenovo Out of Antitrust Complaint

Filed under
Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices' 48-page antitrust complaint against rival Intel reads like a list of major players in the global PC industry, with one glaring exception: there's no mention of China's Lenovo Group.

Etch-A-Sketch to Be on U.K. Cell Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

For doodlers who can't get enough etching and sketching at home, Etch-A-Sketch is coming to a cell phone.

AMD Japan sues Intel Japan for $55 million

Filed under
Legal

Advanced Micro Devices Inc.'s Japan unit said Thursday that it has filed two lawsuits against Intel Corp.'s Japanese unit for $55 million in damages.

Unsung heroes

Filed under
Misc

Bill Gates, the web's Tim Berners-Lee and Linux developer Linus Torvalds are among the stars of today's IT industry but they stand on the shoulders of the many visionaries, inventors and entrepreneurs who gave birth to the modern computing business.

The Xbox 360 and the PS3: late bloomers or complete failures?

Filed under
Gaming

The most ironic bit of it all is that according to developers, if either manufacturer had decided to use an Athlon 64 or a Pentium D in their next-gen console, they would be significantly ahead of the competition in terms of CPU performance.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The community-led renaissance of open source

With few commercial participants, early free software and open source communities were, by definition, community-led. Software was designed and created organically by communities of users in response to their needs and inspiration. The results, to a degree nobody predicted, were often magical. First-generation open source businesses like Red Hat emerged to respond to these needs. They combined the best of both worlds: the flexibility and control of raw open source with the commercial support that enterprises depend on. These new open source businesses found their opportunity by adding the missing—but necessary—commercial services to community-led open source projects. These services would be costly for organizations to provide on their own and potentially even more costly to do without. One early leader of that era, Cygnus Solutions, even adopted the counter-intuitive tagline "Making free software affordable." But back then, it was always overwhelmingly clear: The commercial vendors were in service of the community, filling in around the edges to enable commercial applications. The community was the star, and the companies were the supporting cast. Read more

Election fraud: Is there an open source solution?

Can open source technology help keep our elections honest? With its Trust The Vote Project, the Open Source Election Technology (OSET) Institute is working on making that a reality for elections in the United States and around the world. The project is developing an open, adaptable, flexible, full-featured, and innovative elections technology platform called ElectOS. It will support all aspects of elections administration and voting, including creating, marking, casting, and counting ballots and managing all back-office functions. The software is freely available under an Open Source Initiative (OSI)-recognized public license for adoption, adaptation, and deployment by anyone, including elections jurisdictions directly or, more commonly, commercial vendors or systems integrators. Read more

Meld is an excellent file and folder comparison tool for Windows and Linux

Ever had two sets of the same files and folders and couldn't decide which one to retain? It may take a long time to actually open each to verify the one that's recent or the one you need; while dates associated with the files may help, they won't all the time as they don't tell you anything about the actual content. This is where file comparison tools can be time-savers. Meld is an open source file comparison tool for Windows and Linux for exactly that purpose. Read more