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May 2005

Linux drives worldwide server sales boom

Filed under
Linux

Huge demand for Linux servers has help push the overall server market to new heights, according to IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker.

NVIDIA Supports AMD 64 X2 Processors

Filed under
Hardware

NVIDIA announced that their entire line of NVIDIA nForce media and communications processors for AMD64 platforms fully support the new AMD Athlon 64 X2 dual-core processor.

Konstruct updated

Filed under
KDE

Konstruct updated to KDE 3.4.1. Konstruct is a build system which helps you install KDE releases and applications on your system from source tarballs.

X Factor - understanding the X window system

Filed under
Software

X was originally created in the mid-80s by a research group from MIT. Its goal was to create a windowing system quite unlike any that had been conceived before. Thus X's design differs greatly from that of other windowing systems, having designed-in support for many elements which are unique.

Is your laptop a pain in the neck?

Filed under
Hardware

Statistical information on injuries related to notebook computer use is scarce, but doctors report a steady stream of new patients who've overdone it on the machines.

Nvidia starts working on SLI 2

Filed under
Hardware

Even if ATI Crossfire defeats SLI, Nvidia has some secret horses for a new race. It is working on something that we know as SLI 2.

Andromeda galaxy larger than thought

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The Andromeda galaxy just got bigger -- three times bigger, astronomers said on Monday.

Computer show opens in Taiwan

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The world's second-largest annual computer show, Computex, opened Tuesday in Taiwan, with organizers expecting the highest number of buyers and visitors in the exhibition's 25-year history.

Japan state bans 'Grand Theft Auto' sales

Filed under
Gaming

A state in Japan has decided to ban a U.S. video game from being sold or rented to minors, after officials deemed it harmful and capable of inciting violence.

More in Tux Machines

Linux commands to display your hardware information

There are many reasons you might need to find out details about your computer hardware. For example, if you need help fixing something and post a plea in an online forum, people will immediately ask you for specifics about your computer. Or, if you want to upgrade your computer, you'll need to know what you have and what you can have. You need to interrogate your computer to discover its specifications. Alternatively, you could open up the box and read the labels on the disks, memory, and other devices. Or you could enter the boot-time panels—the so-called UEFI or BIOS panels. Just hit the proper program function key during the boot process to access them. These two methods give you hardware details but omit software information. Or, you could issue a Linux line command. Wait a minute… that sounds difficult. Why would you do this? Read more

Android Leftovers

BlackWeb 1.2

BlackWeb is a penetration and security testing distribution based on Debian. The project's website presents the distribution's features as follows: BlackWeb is a Linux distribution aimed at advanced penetration testing and security auditing. BlackWeb contains several hundred tools which are geared towards various information security tasks, such as penetration testing, security research, computer forensics and reverse engineering. Starting from an appropriately configured LXDE desktop manager it offers stability and speed. BlackWeb has been designed with the aim of achieving the maximum performance and minimum consumption of resources. There are 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds of BlackWeb available on the distribution's website. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is 2.6GB in size. Booting from the media brings up a menu asking if we would like to try BlackWeb's live desktop, run the installer or run the graphical installer. Taking the live desktop options presents us with a graphical login screen where we can sign in with the username "root" and the password "blackweb". Read more

Feh is a light-weight command-line image viewer for Linux

The default image viewer in most Linux distros is a fine option for many users, but if you want a distraction free alternative, Feh is a good option. Feh's interface is as barebones as it gets as it does not have any toolbars or buttons but is a command line interface application; because of that, it is very light on resources and still easy enough to use even for users who shy away from using the command line whenever possible. Read more