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April 2005

Net-illiterate 'failing children'

Filed under
Web

Internet-illiterate parents could leave their children on the wrong side of the digital divide, researchers have said.

Online news sites more liked than ever

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Web

Internet news sites are more popular than ever before and are continuing to erode newspapers' mindshare, research has found.

Cemetery to begin vertical burials

Filed under
Misc

An Australian company has been given approval to begin work on a cemetery where bodies will be buried vertically to save space and minimize impact on the environment, a spokesman said Thursday.

Turner tapping into game market

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Gaming

The company that helped revive old films is hoping to bring classic video games out of the vault. Atlanta-based Turner Broadcasting will move into the subscription PC game market this fall with new GameTap service.

Wal-Mart targets parody site

Filed under
Web

A college student was forced to redesign a Web site satirizing a foundation run by Wal-Mart after the discount retail giant claimed he violated copyright law by using graphics from the company's Web site.

Beware How You Google

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Web

A simple misspelling of Google's domain name could lead to a Web surfer's worst nightmare.

In a new twist to the old practice of "typosquatting," virus writers have registered a slight variation of Google Inc.'s popular search-engine site to take advantage of any users who botch the spelling of the google.com URL.

An Open Letter To Linux Developers

Filed under
Linux

Submitted by helios17 on Wed, 04/27/2005 - 23:00.

First things first. I don't know perl from python. I keep a cheat sheet taped to the side of my monitor with the simplest shell commands. I am not a Linux Expert...I am a Linux Consumer. Having come to the world of Linux rather abruptly, actually as a matter of survival, I did not have the luxury of time. A nasty variant of bagle destroyed my network and shoddy backup practices almost took me into bankruptcy. So here I am, a tad over a year of Linux experience and some deep concerns.

That's 'Mr Scarface' to you...

Filed under
Gaming

Now, simply making a game based around the events of the movie was clearly never going to work. Either the team could do the classic fallback of doing a prequel about how Montana got where he was, or mess with the history and do one of those "ooh, what would have happened if he had survived that manic mansion scene at the end?"

eurogamer.net grills the game's producer Cam Webber on what he claims will become one of this year's biggest hits...

Pics from The Hitchhiker's Guide

Filed under
Movies

We have added news stills from the forthcoming adaptation of Douglas Adams' radio The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

Netscape laid wide open by security flaw

Filed under
Security

Two separate imaging-related security flaws have surfaced in AOL's Netscape browser and in the KDE desktop environment for Unix and Linux, according to security experts. Both could allow an attacker to plant malicious code on a user's system when a specially crafted image is viewed by an affected application, such as a browser, e-mail program or stand-alone viewer, researchers said.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck. So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020). Read more

Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it. It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment. Read more

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