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Reddit: Virtual machine - Linux Ubuntu environment

Linuxinsight - Tuesday 13th of March 2018 01:16:58 AM

found this course which is built on a Linux virtual environment. Learn Linux in its own environment. https://labex.io/courses/1

submitted by /u/kakakaren
[link] [comments]

Looking at Lumina Desktop 2.0

OSNews - Tuesday 13th of March 2018 01:10:10 AM
TrueOS, formerly PC-BSD, has a desktop environment called Lumina. It's getting a big overhaul for Lumina 2.0, and this short interview gives some more details about what's coming. With Lumina Desktop 2.0 we will finally achieve our long-term goal of turning Lumina into a complete, end-to-end management system for the graphical session and removing all the current runtime dependencies from Lumina 1.x (Fluxbox, xscreensaver, compton/xcompmgr). The functionality from those utilities is now provided by Lumina Desktop itself. [...] The entire graphical interface has been written in QML in order to fully-utilize hardware-based GPU acceleration with OpenGL while the backend logic and management systems are still written entirely in C++. This results in blazing fast performance on the backend systems (myriad multi-threaded C++ objects) as well as a smooth and responsive graphical interface with all the bells and whistles (drag and drop, compositing, shading, etc).

New guts bring new processors, DDR4, USB3 to old ThinkPads

OSNews - Tuesday 13th of March 2018 01:03:29 AM
We often see people funneling their passion into keeping beloved devices in operation long past their manufacturer’s intent. These replacement Thinkpad motherboards [Chinese] bring old (yet beloved) Thinkpads a much desired processor upgrade. This is the work of the user [HOPE] on the enthusiast forum 51nb. The hack exemplifies what happens when that passion for legendary gear hits deep electrical expertise and available manufacturing. This isn’t your regular laptop refurbishment, [HOPE] is building something new. This is incredible. I wish someone could do this with an iBook G4 or a 12.1" PowerBook.

LXer: Python, Raspberry Pi how-tos, R programming counterculture, Linux containers, and more

Linuxinsight - Tuesday 13th of March 2018 12:17:47 AM
Last week Python, Raspberry Pi, Linux, containers, and Kubernetes dominated our list of reader favorites.

Python, Raspberry Pi how-tos, R programming counterculture, Linux containers, and more

LXer - Tuesday 13th of March 2018 12:17:47 AM
Last week Python, Raspberry Pi, Linux, containers, and Kubernetes dominated our list of reader favorites.

Reddit: New Fedora 28 Wallpapers

Linuxinsight - Monday 12th of March 2018 11:56:56 PM

Install and Learn to Use Curl on Ubuntu 18.04

LXer - Monday 12th of March 2018 11:03:27 PM
CURL is a command line utility to make HTTP requests and get data from web servers. CURL is also used to test REST APIs, as it is very lightweight and can easily be found on any Linux distribution. In this article, I will show you how to install and use CURL on Ubuntu 18.04 for useful tasks.

LXer: Install and Learn to Use Curl on Ubuntu 18.04

Linuxinsight - Monday 12th of March 2018 11:03:27 PM
CURL is a command line utility to make HTTP requests and get data from web servers. CURL is also used to test REST APIs, as it is very lightweight and can easily be found on any Linux distribution. In this article, I will show you how to install and use CURL on Ubuntu 18.04 for useful tasks.

[$] Variable-length arrays and the max() mess

LWN - Monday 12th of March 2018 09:37:50 PM
Variable-length arrays (VLAs) have a non-constant size that is determined (and which can vary) at run time; they are supported by the ISO C99 standard. Use of VLAs in the kernel has long been discouraged but not prohibited, so there are naturally numerous VLA instances to be found. A recent push to remove VLAs from the kernel entirely has gained momentum, but it ran into an interesting snag on the way.

RedHat: RHSA-2018-0487:01 Important: bind security update

LinuxSecurity.com Advisories - Monday 12th of March 2018 08:24:00 PM
LinuxSecurity.com: An update for bind is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 Advanced Update Support, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 Advanced Update Support, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 Advanced Update Support, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 Telco Extended Update Support, and Red Hat Enterprise

RedHat: RHSA-2018-0475:01 Important: Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

LinuxSecurity.com Advisories - Monday 12th of March 2018 07:39:00 PM
LinuxSecurity.com: An update is now available for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.7, 3.6, 3.5, 3.4, and 3.3. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score,

SciLinux: Important: dhcp on SL7.x x86_64

LinuxSecurity.com Advisories - Monday 12th of March 2018 07:20:00 PM
LinuxSecurity.com: dhcp: Buffer overflow in dhclient possibly allowing code execution triggered by malicious server (CVE-2018-5732) * dhcp: Reference count overflow in dhcpd allows denial of service (CVE-2018-5733) SL7 x86_64 dhclient-4.2.5-58.el7_4.3.x86_64.rpm dhcp-common-4.2.5-58.el7_4.3.x86_64.rpm dhcp-debuginfo-4.2.5-58.el7_4.3.i686.rpm dhcp-debuginfo-4.2.5-58.el7_4.3.x86_64.rpm dhcp [More...]

RedHat: RHSA-2018-0488:01 Important: bind security update

LinuxSecurity.com Advisories - Monday 12th of March 2018 07:17:00 PM
LinuxSecurity.com: An update for bind is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Advanced Update Support, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Telco Extended Update Support, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Update Services for SAP Solutions, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Extended Update Support.

Lego-based hacker kit offers choice of Arduino or Raspberry Pi

Linux Gizmos - Monday 12th of March 2018 07:04:16 PM
A “Leguino” educational hacker kit launching on Kickstarter lets you extend Lego projects with Lego form-factor gears, motors, displays, sensors, and breadboards, controlled by a “Visuino” GUI dev environment running on an Arduino or RPi Zero W. A Belfast based startup called Leguino has launched a Kickstarter project for a Leguino robotics and hacking kit […]

Fedora 27: tor Security Update

LinuxSecurity.com Advisories - Monday 12th of March 2018 07:03:00 PM
LinuxSecurity.com: Update to latest version. Security-Fixes TROVE-2018-001, TROVE-2018-002,

26 Feb 18 – Speed Mentoring

Muktware - Thursday 22nd of February 2018 01:05:13 PM

Please RSVP here:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe4BTHQbZtowHxQH-mT928M3_2l9Q9lpZWcNn4v1_qk4TuLxw/viewform

26 Feb 18 SPWA Speed Mentoring Invite
SPWA Members and Friends,

Please join us for a Speed Mentoring event Monday, February 26, 2018
from 1200-1300 in the Pentagon Conference Center Room B10.  The room
will be open 15 minutes before and after the event for informal
networking.

We look forward to group discussions with mentors:
Ms. Lisa Smith, SES (AF)
CMSgt Melanie Noel (AF)
Ms. Sandra Richardson, SES retired (OSD)
Col Lasheeco Graham (AF)

This event is open to members and non-members.

There is no fee for this event.

SPWA will provide beverages. Any other food consumed must be purchased
on the premises; there is a snackbar onsite.

Contact dodspwa@gmail.com with questions.  We look forward to seeing you there!

TechBytes Episode 89: Back Into Season 5

TechBytes - Friday 4th of September 2015 07:05:21 AM



Direct download as Ogg (2:14:03, 59.0 MB) | High-quality MP3 (30.7 MB)

Summary: An episode which focuses on the rise of Chromebooks, serious issues pertaining to privacy, media bias, and the demise of Windows

This is the first show to have been recorded this year and hopefully the resumption of TechBytes as a weekly of bi-weekly show. We are hoping to facilitate live broadcasting of the show as well (coming soon). The show officially turns 5 in just 4 weeks from now.

We hope you will join us for future shows and consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. You can also visit our archives for past shows.

As embedded (HTML5):


Your browser does not support the audio element.

Download:


(There is also an MP3 version)

End of Era

LinuxGames - Thursday 16th of July 2015 12:25:49 AM
After 17 years on the Internet, AtomicGamer, the site who has been hosting LinuxGames is shutting down at the end of the month. I think it is time also that we put LinuxGames to bed as well. It has been a wild and fascinating ride all these years watching the Linux community mature and come […]
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Heptio Debuts Gimbal Kubernetes Load Balancer Project
    Kubernetes startup Heptio has added another project to its roster of open-source efforts that provide expanded capabilities for container orchestration users.
  • Heptio Launches Kubernetes Load Balancing Application
  • The Role of Site Reliability Engineering in Microservices
    You can always spot the hot jobs in technology: they’re the ones that didn’t exist 10 years ago. While Site Reliability Engineers (SREs) did definitely exist a decade ago, they were mostly inside Google and a handful of other Valley innovators. Today, however, the SRE role exists everywhere, from Uber to Goldman Sachs, everyone is now in the business of keeping their sites online and stable. While SREs are hotshots in the industry, their role in a microservices environment is not just a natural fit that goes hand-in-hand, like peanut butter and jelly. Instead, while SREs and microservices evolved in parallel inside the world’s software companies, the former actually makes life far more difficult for the latter.
  • Lying with statistics, distributions, and popularity contests on Cooking With Linux (without a net)
    It's Tuesday and that means it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net), sponsored and supported by Linux Journal. Today, I'm courting controversy by discussing numbers, OS popularity, and how to pick the right Linux distribution if you want to be where are the beautiful people hang out. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face.
  • Voyage open sources its approach to autonomous vehicle safety
    In an effort to improve autonomous vehicle safety, Voyage is open sourcing its Open Autonomous Safety (OAS) library that contains the company’s internal safety procedures, materials, and test code that is intended to supplement the existing safety programs at autonomous vehicle startups. Voyage is the self-driving business from the educational organization Udacity.
  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to KubeCon Europe
    The cloud native community is gathering in Copenhagen next week for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe! Here’s your guide to the talks and events you won’t want to miss. Meet the Red Hat and CoreOS team members all week long, May 1-4 at booth D-E01.
  • Event - "GNU Health Con 2018" (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain)
    GNU Health is this year holding the III International GNU Health Conference, GNU Health Con 2018. This conference will gather the community of activists and developers who have been working on the project during the past 10 years.
  • ONNX: the Open Neural Network Exchange Format
    The good news is that the battleground is Free and Open. None of the big players are pushing closed-source solutions. Whether it is Keras and Tensorflow backed by Google, MXNet by Apache endorsed by Amazon, or Caffe2 or PyTorch supported by Facebook, all solutions are open-source software. Unfortunately, while these projects are open, they are not interoperable. Each framework constitutes a complete stack that until recently could not interface in any way with any other framework. A new industry-backed standard, the Open Neural Network Exchange format, could change that.
  • L.A. Lawmakers Looking To Take Legal Action Against Google For Not Solving Long-Running City Traffic Problems
    The city's government believes the traffic/mapping app has made Los Angeles' congestion worse. That the very body tasked with finding solutions to this omnipresent L.A. problem is looking to hold a private third party company responsible for its own shortcomings isn't surprising. If a third-party app can't create better traffic flow, what chance do city planners have? But beyond the buck-passing on congestion, the city may have a point about Waze making driving around Los Angeles a bit more hazardous. For several months, it's been noted that Waze has been sending drivers careening down the steepest grade in the city -- Baxter Street. Drivers seeking routes around Glendale Ave. traffic choke points have been routed to a street with a 32% grade, increasing the number of accidents located there and generally resulting in barely-controlled mayhem. When any sort of precipitation falls from the sky, the city goes insane. Drivers bypassing Glendale are now hurtling down a steep, water-covered hill, compounding the problem.
  • Even Microsoft's lost interest in Windows Phone: Skype and Yammer apps killed
    Microsoft’s given users of its collaboration apps on Windows Phone under a month’s warning of their demise. A support note from late last week advises that “Windows phone apps for Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, and Yammer are retiring on May 20, 2018.” “Retiring” means all three will vanish from the Microsoft store on May 20, with differing results.
  • Should You Build Your Own DIY Security System?

"Native Linux apps in Chrome OS" and Kernel News From LWN

  • Native Linux apps in Chrome OS will have a slick, electric Material Design theme
    The Chrome OS developers have been working out the stylistic elements of what you’ll see once you open your first native Linux apps in Chrome OS, and they’ve opted for Adapta, a popular Material Design-inspired Gtk theme that can be used on many of your favorite GNU/Linux distributions. For those of you not keeping track, the Chrome OS developers have been busy baking native container functionality into Chrome OS that allows the user-friendly startup of regular Linux applications in containers-within-VMs. This project, codename “Crostini,” is the largest change to Chrome OS since Android apps were introduced. Containers allow for applications to run in their own dedicated environment in isolation of the host OS – like a virtual machine, except unlike a VM, it doesn’t virtualize the whole OS to make the application work, it just bundles up the application and necessary baggage into an executable package.
  • The rhashtable documentation I wanted to read
    The rhashtable data structure is a generic resizable hash-table implementation in the Linux kernel, which LWN first introduced as "relativistic hash tables" back in 2014. I thought at the time that it might be fun to make use of rhashtables, but didn't, until an opportunity arose through my work on the Lustre filesystem. Lustre is a cluster filesystem that is currently in drivers/staging while the code is revised to meet upstream requirements. One of those requirements is to avoid duplicating similar functionality where possible. As Lustre contains a resizable hash table, it really needs to be converted to use rhashtables instead — at last I have my opportunity. It didn't take me long to discover that the rhashtable implementation in Linux 4.15 is quite different from the one that originally landed in Linux 3.17, so the original LWN introduction is now barely relevant. I also quickly discovered that the in-kernel documentation was partially wrong, far from complete, and didn't provide any sort of "getting started" guide. Nevertheless I persisted and eventually developed a fairly complete understanding of the code, which seems worth sharing. This article gives an introduction to the use of the rhashtable interfaces without getting into too many internal implementation details. A followup will explain how rhashtables work internally and show how some of the mechanism details leak though the interfaces.
  • The second half of the 4.17 merge window
    By the time the 4.17 merge window was closed and 4.17-rc1 was released, 11,769 non-merge changesets had been pulled into the mainline repository. 4.17 thus looks to be a typically busy development cycle, with a merge window only slightly more busy than 4.16 had. Some 6,000 of those changes were pulled after last week's summary was written.

Software: LibreNMS, Pidgin, Wireshark and More

  • Featured Network Monitoring Tool for Linux
    LibreNMS is an open source, powerful and feature-rich auto-discovering PHP based network monitoring system which uses the SNMP protocol. It supports a broad range of operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, as well as network devices including Cisco, Juniper, Brocade, Foundry, HP and many more.
  • Get started with Pidgin: An open source replacement for Skype
    Technology is at an interesting crossroads, where Linux rules the server landscape but Microsoft rules the enterprise desktop. Office 365, Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, OneDrive, Outlook... the list goes on of Microsoft software and services that dominate the enterprise workspace. What if you could replace that proprietary software with free and open source applications and make them work with an Office 365 backend you have no choice but to use? Buckle up, because that is exactly what we are going to do with Pidgin, an open source replacement for Skype.
  • Wireshark, World’s Most Popular Network Protocol Analyzer, Gets Major Release
    Wireshark, world’s most popular open-source network protocol analyzer, has been updated to a new stable series, versioned 2.6, a major update that adds numerous new features and improvements, as well as support for new protocols. A lot of user interface improvements have been made since Wireshark 2.5, and Wireshark 2.6 appears to be the last release that will support the legacy GTK+ graphical user interface, as the development team announced it wouldn't be supported in the next major series, Wireshark 3.0. New features in Wireshark 2.6 include support for HTTP Request sequences, support for MaxMind DB files, Microsoft Network Monitor capture file support, as well as LoRaTap capture interface support. The IP map feature was removed, as well as support for the GeoIP and GeoLite Legacy databases.
  • A look at terminal emulators, part 2
    A comparison of the feature sets for a handful of terminal emulators was the subject of a recent article; here I follow that up by examining the performance of those terminals. This might seem like a lesser concern, but as it turns out, terminals exhibit surprisingly high latency for such fundamental programs. I also examine what is traditionally considered "speed" (but is really scroll bandwidth) and memory usage, with the understanding that the impact of memory use is less than it was when I looked at this a decade ago (in French).
  • Counting beans—and more—with Beancount
    It is normally the grumpy editor's job to look at accounting software; he does so with an eye toward getting the business off of the proprietary QuickBooks application and moving to something free. It may be that Beancount deserves a look of that nature before too long but, in the meantime, a slightly less grumpy editor has been messing with this text-based accounting tool for a variety of much smaller projects. It is an interesting system, with a lot of capabilities, but its reliance on hand-rolling for various pieces may scare some folks off.
  • Firefox release speed wins
    Sylvestre wrote about how we were able to ship new releases for Nightly, Beta, Release and ESR versions of Firefox for Desktop and Android in less than a day in response to the pwn2own contest. People commented on how much faster the Beta and Release releases were compared to the ESR release, so I wanted to dive into the releases on the different branches to understand if this really was the case, and if so, why? [..] We can see that Firefox 59 and 60.0b4 were significantly faster to run than ESR 52 was! What's behind this speedup?
  • LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 Is Ready To Roll For Advancing The Open-Source Office
    LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 was tagged overnight as the first development release towards this next updated open-source office suite release succeeding the big LibreOffice 6.0. LibreOffice 6.1.0 is set to be released by the middle of August and for that to happen the alpha release has now been hit followed by the beta release this time next month, and the release candidates to come through the month of July. The feature freeze and branching occurs at next month's beta stage while the hard code freeze is expected for the middle of July.

today's howtos