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Updated: 3 years 30 weeks ago

FLOM 0.5.2

Sunday 25th of May 2014 08:46:48 AM
FLOM is a distributed lock manager that can be used to avoid shell tricks and safely execute different tasks that cannot run at the same time. It manages process serialization in the same way nice manages process prioritization. It implements the same lock mode semantic proposed by VMS DLM to allow non-trivial command serialization use cases. The goal is to "just work"; everything implemented must be useful and easy to use (configuration is reduced to a bare minimum). It works inside a single system or in a network of IP connected systems.

Release Notes: This release introduces "hierarchical resources" support. Hierarchical resources allows you to model multiple level locks: they can be useful for filesystems and for abstract resources with an inherent hierarchy. Typical use cases are: "consistent backup", "consistent producers/consumers" scenarios, and so on.

Tags: shell lock serialization

Licenses: GPLv2

4MLinux 9.0 Allinone Edition BETA

Sunday 25th of May 2014 05:59:49 AM
4MLinux is a miniature Linux distribution focusing on four capabilities: maintenance (by using it as a system rescue live CD), multimedia (for example, for playing video DVDs), miniserver (using the inetd daemon), and mystery (meaning console games).

Release Notes: This release has Wine Git-2014-05-13, which is able to run Mozilla software (Firefox 29.0.1, SeaMonkey 2.26, and Thunderbird 24.5.0) with Flash Player 12 support enabled. 4MLinux Printing Suite 9.0 and 4MLinux QtPack (Qt 4.8.6 and 5.3.0, QupZilla Git-2014-05-20, SMplayer with SMTube SVN r6255) are also included. FTP (WinSCP 5.5.2), IRC (Irssi 0.8.16rc1, XChat 2.8.9), P2P (rTorrent 0.9.2, eMule 0.50a), and SSH (PuTTY 0.63) clients are available, too. The size of the ISO image is about 145 MB.

Tags: Linux distribution, Live-CD, system, rescue, Console, Server, multimedia, Games - Linux, X windows

Licenses: GPLv3

4MLinux 9.0 BETA

Sunday 25th of May 2014 05:58:20 AM
4MLinux is a miniature Linux distribution focusing on four capabilities: maintenance (by using it as a system rescue live CD), multimedia (for example, for playing video DVDs), miniserver (using the inetd daemon), and mystery (meaning console games).

Release Notes: The main features in this release are maintenance (MBR and GPT partitioning software, 4MLinux Backup Scripts 9.0, ClamAV 0.98.3), multimedia (MPlayer SVN-r37146, FFmpeg Git-2014-04-10), a mini server (FTP, HTTP, SSH, SFTP), and mystery (a set of small games). The X Window System is based on X.Org Server 1.15.1, Mesa 10.1.3, JWM 2.2.2, and the FOX toolkit 1.6.49. Fully automatic installation of the "vanilla" versions of LibreOffice 4.2.4, Java RE 7u55, and VirtualBox 4.3.12 is also supported. The size of the ISO image is about 55 MB.

Tags: Linux distribution, Live-CD, system, rescue, Console, Server, multimedia, Games - Linux, X windows

Licenses: GPLv3

XMLTV 0.5.65

Sunday 25th of May 2014 04:15:47 AM
XMLTV is a set of programs to obtain and process TV (tvguide) listings and manage your TV viewing. It stores the listings in an XML-based format and most of the programs are filters which read and/or write XML. It includes tools to obtain, sort, grep, print, and munge listings, and two end-user programs to plan a week's TV viewing.

Release Notes: This release includes major updates to: tv_grab_dk_dr, tv_grab_dtv_la, tv_grab_es_laguiatv, tv_grab_fi, tv_grab_fi_sv, tv_grab_huro, tv_grab_is, tv_grab_pt, tv_grab_pt_meo, tv_grab_nl, tv_grab_uk_atlas, tv_grab_uk_guardian, tv_grab_uk_tvguide, tv_cat, tv_imdb, tv_to_text, and tv_to_latex.

Tags: Text Processing, Markup, XML, Games/Entertainment, Home Automation

Licenses: GPL

BAIK 8.1.5

Saturday 24th of May 2014 09:59:25 PM
BAIK (Bahasa Anak Indonesia untuk Komputer) is a scripting language whose syntax is in Indonesian. It supports GUI, file operations, conditions, arrays, functions, simple OOP, RDBMS (Oracle, SQLite, MySQL, and PostgreSQL databases), CGI, and TCP/IP networking.

Release Notes: Starting from version 8, BAIK supports GPIO and Analog Input for embedded system. It was tested not only on PCs, but also on ARM embedded systems such as Beagleboard and Beaglebone Black. This release fixed some bugs in the window event handling function.

Tags: Software Development, Interpreters

ms-sys 2.4.0

Saturday 24th of May 2014 08:42:21 PM
ms-sys is a Linux program for writing Microsoft compatible boot records. The program does the same as Microsoft's "fdisk /mbr" to a hard disk or "sys d:" to a floppy or FAT32 partition, except that it does not copy any system files (only the boot record is written).

Release Notes: Adds support for syslinux GPT MBR. Updates the syslinux MBR to version 6.02.

Release Tags: Stable

Tags: Boot

Licenses: GPL

Go! 0.5.0

Saturday 24th of May 2014 01:13:43 PM
Go! is a PHP 5.4 library that allows developers to add support for aspect-oriented programming (AOP) to their PHP applications. It doesn't require PECL extensions, Runkit, evals, or DI containers. The code with weaved aspects is fully readable and native, and can be easily debugged with XDebug. You can debug either classes or aspects. It can potentially* be installed in every PHP application because you don't have to change the application source code at all. As an example, with the help of 10-20 lines of code it is possible to intercept all of the public, protected, and static methods in all classes of an application, and display the name and the arguments of each method during its execution.

Release Notes: Proxies are now stored in separate files to allow more transparent debugging. A cache warmer command was added. Extended pointcut syntax for or-ed methods: ClassName->method1|method2(*). Support for read-only filesystems was added (phar, GAE, etc.). Inheritance support during class-loading and weaving.

Release Tags: 0.5.0

Tags: aop, PHP, aspect-oriented programming, oop

Licenses: MIT

Classing{js} 1.0.3

Saturday 24th of May 2014 12:25:17 PM
Classing{js} creates a classical-like OOP interface directly into JavaScript.Without compilation or any pre-process, it behaves almost exactly like any regular classical object oriented environment. It provides function overloading, concrete (Final or Extensible) and abstract classes, defining components in the three access levels {public,private and protected}, static components, classical inheritance and method overriding, defining and implementing multiple interfaces, and much more.

Release Notes: In this release, the library's APIs are wrapped in a namespace called classing to avoid possible conflicts with other libraries that may use the same API's names.

Tags: Internet, Web, JavaScript library, object oriented, classes, Cross browser compatibility

Licenses: MIT License

remoteEncFs 0.2.0

Saturday 24th of May 2014 12:17:10 PM
remoteEncFs supports some use cases for using a remote filesystem encrypted with encfs locally. Such filesystems can be created with Boxcryptor Classic. In particular, remoteEncFs supports local synchronization and mounting local or remote copies.

Release Notes: Implements local --unmount.

Release Tags: Major feature enhancements

Tags: encrypted cloud storage

Licenses: GPLv2

Aniketos-SSVV 0.01

Saturday 24th of May 2014 10:48:49 AM
Aniketos-SSVV (Aniketos Security Service Validation and Verification) provides a series of modules that work together to validate the security properties of a Web service composition. The package is given a selection of service compositions (provided in the form of BPMN processes with Web services bound to the service tasks), along with the security policy to be fulfilled. The package then performs various checks on the services to establish whether each composition satisfies the policy, returning an ordered list (ordered in terms of security) of the services that do. It forms part of the larger Aniketos project comprised of four packages in total.

Release Notes: This is the initial testing release. It provides a full working toolchain from submission of BPMN plans through to the ordering of Web Service bindings with respect to security policy compliance. There's still lots of work to do and contributions (bugs, suggestions, code, documentation, etc.) from the community are welcomed.

Release Tags: Alpha, Testing, Initial, features, code, Documentation

Tags: Web Services, Security, Security Analysis, Trustworthy Computing, SOA, SOAP, verification, Java 1.6, Eclipse, composite services, bpmn, ConSpec, Network

Licenses: BSD Three-Clause, LGPL v3

AeonWave 2.4.0

Saturday 24th of May 2014 08:43:46 AM
AeonWave is a cross platform, hardware accelerated, multi-threaded, and versatile stereo and 4D audio mixing library. By combining hardware accelerated rendering and a low memory footprint the library can handle almost any situation, from virtual synthesizer apps for smart phones to immersive simulation. It has a small, easy to use, fault tolerant, and consistent API, low latency support by using hardware acceleration, simultaneous support for stereo and 4D audio, audio frames with sub-mixing capabilities, support for stereo and 3D audio effects and filters, and a Freeware supplemental OpenAL implementation.

Release Notes: The license conditions were changed to allow anyone to include the binaries with their product. A reorganization of the code resulted in rendering speed improvements of up to 75%. There were WASAPI, ALSA, and WAVE file backend fixes and improvements. Surround Sound, Spatial, and HRTF playback were tweaked.

Release Tags: Major, Stable

Tags: multimedia, Sound/Audio, Software Development, Libraries

Licenses: Proprietary

pyxattr 0.5.3

Friday 23rd of May 2014 11:02:03 PM
pyxattr is a Python extension module wrapper for libattr, which can be used to query, list, add, and remove extended attributes from files and directories.

Release Notes: This release features a speedup for handling files without xattrs, more forgiving file name encoding under Python 3, and improvements to the test suite.

Tags: Filesystems

Licenses: LGPL

pyAggr3g470r 5.3

Friday 23rd of May 2014 10:39:13 PM
pyAggr3g470r is a news aggregator with a Web interface based on Flask. It can be deployed on Heroku or on a traditional server.

Release Notes: This release introduces some UI improvements, especially for the home page.

Release Tags: Minor feature enhancements

Tags: RSS, Python, feedreader, aggregator, aggregate, news, news aggregator, heroku

Licenses: Affero GPL v3 or more recent

Relevation 1.3

Friday 23rd of May 2014 10:22:45 PM
Relevation is a command-line interface to retrieve passwords stored with the Revelation Password Manager. It provides equivalent functionality to the "Find" box as found in Revelation's GUI.

Release Notes: Support for the newer v2 data format (Revelation 0.14) and better handling of Unicode fields (i.e. accented characters in entries).

Release Tags: Stable, Major

Tags: Security, Utilities, Command Line

Licenses: BSD Revised

TCPDF 6.0.082

Friday 23rd of May 2014 10:07:26 PM
TCPDF is a PHP class for generating PDF documents without requiring external extensions. TCPDF supports all ISO page formats and custom page formats, custom margins and units of measure, UTF-8 Unicode, RTL languages, HTML, barcodes, TrueTypeUnicode, TrueType, OpenType, Type1, and CID-0 fonts, images, graphic functions, clipping, bookmarks, JavaScript, forms, page compression, digital signatures, and encryption.

Release Notes: This version contains a bugfix related to PNG images and one related to font tools.

Tags: Software Development, Libraries, php classes, Text Processing

Licenses: LGPL

webon irforum-2.30_jp

Friday 23rd of May 2014 09:38:37 PM
webon is a Web content management system. It provides an access log to check who has visited your site. It has a counter that lets anybody know the number of people who have visited your site.

Release Notes: This release adds a logout function to PasswordController.php.

Licenses: GPL, BSD Revised

Guacamole 0.9.1

Friday 23rd of May 2014 09:07:10 PM
Guacamole is an HTML5 Web application that provides access to desktop environments using remote desktop protocols such as VNC or RDP. A centralized server acts as a tunnel and proxy, allowing access to multiple desktops through a Web browser. No plugins are needed. The client requires nothing more than a Web browser supporting HTML5 and AJAX.

Release Notes: Overall performance, the user interface, and mobile support have been significantly improved. Telnet is now supported. Minor bugs within the MySQL authentication and terminal emulation have been fixed.

Tags: VNC, Remote Access, remote desktop, Web Application, rdp

Licenses: MIT

ClearOS 6.6.0 Beta 1

Friday 23rd of May 2014 06:34:29 PM
ClearOS is an integrated network server gateway solution for small and distributed organizations. The software provides all the necessary server tools to run an organization including email, anti-virus, anti-spam, file sharing, groupware, VPN, firewall, intrusion detection/prevention, content filtering, bandwidth management, multi-WAN, and more. You can think of it as a next generation small business server. Through the intuitive Web-based management console, an administrator can configure the server software along with integrated cloud-based services.

Release Notes: In addition to bugfixes and enhancements, this release introduces Wordpress, Joomla!, Tiki Wiki, WPAD, and AppFirst. Under the hood, the event system, IPv6, and ClearOS 7 compatibility have also been a focus of this release.

Release Tags: Beta

Tags: Server, Firewall, Filters, Operating Systems, gateway

Licenses: GPL, Public Domain

Qmmp 0.7.7

Friday 23rd of May 2014 06:31:14 PM
Qmmp (Qt-based Multimedia Player) is an audio player with a user interface similar to Winamp or Xmms. Alternative user interfaces also are available.

Release Notes: This is the last release of the 0.7.x branch. The first release of the new 0.8.x branch will be released next time.

Release Tags: locale, XDG, Stable

Tags: Qt, Audio, MP3, OPUS, vorbis

Licenses: GPL v2 Or Later

relax 3.2.1

Friday 23rd of May 2014 03:00:23 PM
relax is a program designed for the study of the dynamics of proteins and other macromolecules though the analysis of experimental NMR data. It supports exponential curve fitting for the calculation of the R1 and R2 relaxation rates, calculation of the NOE, reduced spectral density mapping, the Lipari and Szabo model-free analysis, study of domain motions via the N-state model (or ensemble analysis) and frame order dynamics theories using anisotropic NMR parameters such as RDCs and PCSs, the investigation of stereochemistry in dynamic ensembles, and the analysis of relaxation dispersion.

Release Notes: This is a major bugfix release which includes the equations for the "B14" and "B14 full" relaxation dispersion models, from Baldwin 2014 and introduced with relax version 3.2.0, now being calculated correctly, the 'NS CPMG 2-site expanded' model correctly handling edge cases where no exchange is expected, and the structure.delete user function correctly operating when multiple models are loaded into the data store.

Tags: Scientific, Analysis, Model-free, RMSD, R1, R2, NOE, Frame order, NMR, relaxation data, relaxation dispersion

Licenses: GPL

More in Tux Machines

Security: OpenSSL, IoT, and LWN Coverage of 'Intelpocalypse'

  • Another Face to Face: Email Changes and Crypto Policy
    The OpenSSL OMC met last month for a two-day face-to-face meeting in London, and like previous F2F meetings, most of the team was present and we addressed a great many issues. This blog posts talks about some of them, and most of the others will get their own blog posts, or notices, later. Red Hat graciously hosted us for the two days, and both Red Hat and Cryptsoft covered the costs of their employees who attended. One of the overall threads of the meeting was about increasing the transparency of the project. By default, everything should be done in public. We decided to try some major changes to email and such.
  • Some Basic Rules for Securing Your IoT Stuff

    Throughout 2016 and 2017, attacks from massive botnets made up entirely of hacked [sic] IoT devices had many experts warning of a dire outlook for Internet security. But the future of IoT doesn’t have to be so bleak. Here’s a primer on minimizing the chances that your IoT things become a security liability for you or for the Internet at large.

  • A look at the handling of Meltdown and Spectre
    The Meltdown/Spectre debacle has, deservedly, reached the mainstream press and, likely, most of the public that has even a remote interest in computers and security. It only took a day or so from the accelerated disclosure date of January 3—it was originally scheduled for January 9—before the bugs were making big headlines. But Spectre has been known for at least six months and Meltdown for nearly as long—at least to some in the industry. Others that were affected were completely blindsided by the announcements and have joined the scramble to mitigate these hardware bugs before they bite users. Whatever else can be said about Meltdown and Spectre, the handling (or, in truth, mishandling) of this whole incident has been a horrific failure. For those just tuning in, Meltdown and Spectre are two types of hardware bugs that affect most modern CPUs. They allow attackers to cause the CPU to do speculative execution of code, while timing memory accesses to deduce what has or has not been cached, to disclose the contents of memory. These disclosures can span various security boundaries such as between user space and the kernel or between guest operating systems running in virtual machines. For more information, see the LWN article on the flaws and the blog post by Raspberry Pi founder Eben Upton that well describes modern CPU architectures and speculative execution to explain why the Raspberry Pi is not affected.
  • Addressing Meltdown and Spectre in the kernel
    When the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities were disclosed on January 3, attention quickly turned to mitigations. There was already a clear defense against Meltdown in the form of kernel page-table isolation (KPTI), but the defenses against the two Spectre variants had not been developed in public and still do not exist in the mainline kernel. Initial versions of proposed defenses have now been disclosed. The resulting picture shows what has been done to fend off Spectre-based attacks in the near future, but the situation remains chaotic, to put it lightly. First, a couple of notes with regard to Meltdown. KPTI has been merged for the 4.15 release, followed by a steady trickle of fixes that is undoubtedly not yet finished. The X86_BUG_CPU_INSECURE processor bit is being renamed to X86_BUG_CPU_MELTDOWN now that the details are public; there will be bug flags for the other two variants added in the near future. 4.9.75 and 4.4.110 have been released with their own KPTI variants. The older kernels do not have mainline KPTI, though; instead, they have a backport of the older KAISER patches that more closely matches what distributors shipped. Those backports have not fully stabilized yet either. KPTI patches for ARM are circulating, but have not yet been merged.
  • Is it time for open processors?
    The disclosure of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities has brought a new level of attention to the security bugs that can lurk at the hardware level. Massive amounts of work have gone into improving the (still poor) security of our software, but all of that is in vain if the hardware gives away the game. The CPUs that we run in our systems are highly proprietary and have been shown to contain unpleasant surprises (the Intel management engine, for example). It is thus natural to wonder whether it is time to make a move to open-source hardware, much like we have done with our software. Such a move may well be possible, and it would certainly offer some benefits, but it would be no panacea. Given the complexity of modern CPUs and the fierceness of the market in which they are sold, it might be surprising to think that they could be developed in an open manner. But there are serious initiatives working in this area; the idea of an open CPU design is not pure fantasy. A quick look around turns up several efforts; the following list is necessarily incomplete.
  • Notes from the Intelpocalypse
    Rumors of an undisclosed CPU security issue have been circulating since before LWN first covered the kernel page-table isolation patch set in November 2017. Now, finally, the information is out — and the problem is even worse than had been expected. Read on for a summary of these issues and what has to be done to respond to them in the kernel. All three disclosed vulnerabilities take advantage of the CPU's speculative execution mechanism. In a simple view, a CPU is a deterministic machine executing a set of instructions in sequence in a predictable manner. Real-world CPUs are more complex, and that complexity has opened the door to some unpleasant attacks. A CPU is typically working on the execution of multiple instructions at once, for performance reasons. Executing instructions in parallel allows the processor to keep more of its subunits busy at once, which speeds things up. But parallel execution is also driven by the slowness of access to main memory. A cache miss requiring a fetch from RAM can stall the execution of an instruction for hundreds of processor cycles, with a clear impact on performance. To minimize the amount of time it spends waiting for data, the CPU will, to the extent it can, execute instructions after the stalled one, essentially reordering the code in the program. That reordering is often invisible, but it occasionally leads to the sort of fun that caused Documentation/memory-barriers.txt to be written.

US Sanctions Against Chinese Android Phones, LWN Report on Eelo

  • A new bill would ban the US government from using Huawei and ZTE phones
    US lawmakers have long worried about the security risks posed the alleged ties between Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE and the country’s government. To that end, Texas Representative Mike Conaway introduced a bill last week called Defending U.S. Government Communications Act, which aims to ban US government agencies from using phones and equipment from the companies. Conaway’s bill would prohibit the US government from purchasing and using “telecommunications equipment and/or services,” from Huawei and ZTE. In a statement on his site, he says that technology coming from the country poses a threat to national security, and that use of this equipment “would be inviting Chinese surveillance into all aspects of our lives,” and cites US Intelligence and counterintelligence officials who say that Huawei has shared information with state leaders, and that the its business in the US is growing, representing a further security risk.
  • U.S. lawmakers urge AT&T to cut commercial ties with Huawei - sources
    U.S. lawmakers are urging AT&T Inc, the No. 2 wireless carrier, to cut commercial ties to Chinese phone maker Huawei Technologies Co Ltd and oppose plans by telecom operator China Mobile Ltd to enter the U.S. market because of national security concerns, two congressional aides said. The warning comes after the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump took a harder line on policies initiated by his predecessor Barack Obama on issues ranging from Beijing’s role in restraining North Korea to Chinese efforts to acquire U.S. strategic industries. Earlier this month, AT&T was forced to scrap a plan to offer its customers Huawei [HWT.UL] handsets after some members of Congress lobbied against the idea with federal regulators, sources told Reuters.
  • Eelo seeks to make a privacy-focused phone
    A focus on privacy is a key feature being touted by a number of different projects these days—from KDE to Tails to Nextcloud. One of the biggest privacy leaks for most people is their phone, so it is no surprise that there are projects looking to address that as well. A new entrant in that category is eelo, which is a non-profit project aimed at producing not only a phone, but also a suite of web services. All of that could potentially replace the Google or Apple mothership, which tend to collect as much personal data as possible.

today's howtos

Mozilla: Resource Hogs, Privacy Month, Firefox Census, These Weeks in Firefox

  • Firefox Quantum Eats RAM Like Chrome
    For a long time, Mozilla’s Firefox has been my web browser of choice. I have always preferred it to using Google’s Chrome, because of its simplicity and reasonable system resource (especially RAM) usage. On many Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Linux Mint and many others, Firefox even comes installed by default. Recently, Mozilla released a new, powerful and faster version of Firefox called Quantum. And according to the developers, it’s new with a “powerful engine that’s built for rapid-fire performance, better, faster page loading that uses less computer memory.”
  • Mozilla Communities Speaker Series #PrivacyMonth
    As a part of the Privacy Month initiative, Mozilla volunteers are hosting a couple of speaker series webinars on Privacy, Security and related topics. The webinars will see renowned speakers talking to us about their work around privacy, how to take control of your digital self, some privacy-security tips and much more.
  • “Ewoks or Porgs?” and Other Important Questions
    You ever go to a party where you decide to ask people REAL questions about themselves, rather than just boring chit chat? Us, too! That’s why we’ve included questions that really hone in on the important stuff in our 2nd Annual Firefox Census.
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 30