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Updated: 11 min 41 sec ago

Jonathan Dowland: Vimwiki

7 hours 14 min ago

At the start of the year I begun keeping a daily diary for work as a simple text file. I've used various other approaches for this over the years, including many paper diaries and more complex digital systems. One great advantage of the one-page text file was it made assembling my weekly status report email very quick, nearly just a series of copies and pastes. But of course there are drawbacks and room for improvement.

vimwiki is a personal wiki plugin for the vim and neovim editors. I've tried to look at it before, years ago, but I found it too invasive, changing key bindings and display settings for any use of vim, and I use vim a lot.

I decided to give it another look. The trigger was actually something completely unrelated: Steve Losh's blog post "Coming Home to vim". I've been using vim for around 17 years but I still learned some new things from that blog post. In particular, I've never bothered to Use The Leader for user-specific shortcuts.

The Leader, to me, feels like a namespace that plugins should not touch: it's like the /usr/local of shortcut keys, a space for the local user only. Vimwiki's default bindings include several incorporating the Leader. Of course since I didn't use the leader, those weren't the ones that bothered me: It turns out I regularly use carriage return and backspace for moving the cursor around in normal mode, and Vimwiki steals both of those. It also truncates the display of (what it thinks are) URIs. It turns out I really prefer to see exactly what's in the file I'm editing. I haven't used vim folds since I first switched to it, despite them being why I switched.

Disabling all the default bindings and URI concealing stuff and Vimwiki is now much less invasive and I can explore its features at my own pace:

let g:vimwiki_key_mappings = { 'all_maps': 0, } let g:vimwiki_conceallevel = 0 let g:vimwiki_url_maxsave = 0

Followed by explicitly configuring the bindings I want. I'm letting it steal carriage return. And yes, I've used some Leader bindings after all.

nnoremap <leader>ww :VimwikiIndex<cr> nnoremap <leader>wi :VimwikiDiaryIndex<cr> nnoremap <leader>wd :VimwikiMakeDiaryNote<cr> nnoremap <CR> :VimwikiFollowLink<cr> nnoremap <Tab> :VimwikiNextLink<cr> nnoremap <S-Tab> :VimwikiPrevLink<cr> nnoremap <C-Down> :VimwikiDiaryNextDay<cr> nnoremap <C-Up> :VimwikiDiaryPrevDay<cr>

,wd (my leader) now brings me straight to today's diary page, and I can create separate, non-diary pages for particular work items (e.g. a Ticket reference) that will span more than one day, and keep all the relevant stuff in one place.

Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 155 released

Friday 7th of August 2020 12:00:00 AM

The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 155. This version includes the following changes:

[ Chris Lamb ] * Bump Python requirement from 3.6 to 3.7 - most distributions are either shipping3.5 or 3.7, so supporting 3.6 is not somewhat unnecessary and also more difficult to test locally. * Improvements to setup.py: - Apply the Black source code reformatter. - Add some URLs for the site of PyPI.org. - Update "author" and author email. * Explicitly support Python 3.8. [ Frazer Clews ] * Move away from the deprecated logger.warn method logger.warning. [ Mattia Rizzolo ] * Document ("classify") on PyPI that this project works with Python 3.8.

You find out more by visiting the project homepage.

Dirk Eddelbuettel: nanotime 0.3.0: Yuge New Features!

Thursday 6th of August 2020 11:53:00 PM

A fresh major release of the nanotime package for working with nanosecond timestamps is hitting CRAN mirrors right now.

nanotime relies on the RcppCCTZ package for (efficient) high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it has benefitted greatly from work by Leonardo Silvestri who rejigged internals in S4—and now added new types for periods, intervals and durations. This is what is commonly called a big fucking deal!! So a really REALLY big thank you to my coauthor Leonardo for all these contributions.

With all these Yuge changes patiently chisseled in by Leonardo, it took some time since the last release and a few more things piled up. Matt Dowle corrected something we borked for integration with the lovely and irreplacable data.table. We also switched to the awesome yet minimal tinytest package by Mark van der Loo, and last but not least we added the beginnings of a proper vignette—currently at nine pages but far from complete.

The NEWS snippet adds full details.

Changes in version 0.3.0 (2020-08-06)
  • Use tzstr= instead of tz= in call to RcppCCTZ::parseDouble()) (Matt Dowle in #49).

  • Add new comparison operators for nanotime and charcters (Dirk in #54 fixing #52).

  • Switch from RUnit to tinytest (Dirk in #55)

  • Substantial functionality extension in with new types nanoduration, nanoival and nanoperiod (Leonardo in #58, #60, #62, #63, #65, #67, #70 fixing #47, #51, #57, #61, #64 with assistance from Dirk).

  • A new (yet still draft-ish) vignette was added describing the four core types (Leonardo and Dirk in #71).

  • A required compilation flag for Windows was added (Leonardo in #72).

  • RcppCCTZ function are called in new 'non-throwing' variants to not trigger exeception errors (Leonardo in #73).

We also have a diff to the previous version thanks to CRANberries. More details and examples are at the nanotime page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Chris Lamb: The Bringers of Beethoven

Thursday 6th of August 2020 09:48:27 PM

This is a curiously poignant work to me that I doubt I would ever be able to communicate in writing. I found it first about fifteen years ago with a friend who I am quite regrettably no longer in regular contact with, so there was some complicated nostalgia entangled with rediscovering it today.

What might I say about it instead? One tell-tale sign of 'good' art is that you can find something new in it, or yourself, each time. In this sense, despite The Bringers of Beethoven being more than a little ridiculous, it is somehow 'good' music to me. For example, it only really dawned on me now that the whole poem is an allegory for a GDR-like totalitarianism.

But I also realised that it is not an accident that it is Beethoven himself (quite literally the soundtrack for Enlightenment humanism) that is being weaponised here, rather than some fourth-rate composer of military marches or one with a problematic past. That is to say, not only is the poem arguing that something universally recognised as an unalloyed good can be subverted for propagandistic ends, but that is precisely the point being made by the regime. An inverted Clockwork Orange, if you like.

Yet when I listen to it again I can't help but laugh. I think of the 18th-century poet Alexander Pope, who first used the word bathos to refer to those abrupt and often absurd transitions from the elevated to the ordinary, contrasting it with the concept of pathos, the sincere feeling of sadness and tragedy. I can't think of two better words.

Joey Hess: Mr Process's wild ride

Thursday 6th of August 2020 08:02:28 PM

When a unix process is running in a directory, and that directory gets renamed, the process is taken on a ride to a new location in the filesystem. Suddenly, any "../" paths it might be using point to new, and unexpected locations.

This can be a source of interesting behavior, and also of security holes.

Suppose root is poking around in ~user/foo/bar/ and decides to vim ../../etc/conffile

If the user notices this process is running, they can mv ~/foo/bar /tmp and when vim saves the file, it will write to /tmp/bar/../../etc/conffile AKA /etc/conffile.

(Vim does warn that the file has changed while it was being edited. Other editors may not. Or root may be feeling especially BoFH and decide to overwrite the user's changes to their file. Or the rename could perhaps be carefully timed to avoid vim's overwrite protection.)

Or, suppose root, in the same place, decides to archive ../../etc with tar, and then delete it:

tar cf etc.tar ../../etc; rm -rf ../../etc

Now the user has some time to take root's shell on a ride, before the rm starts ... and make it delete all of /etc!

Anyone know if this class of security hole has a name?

Christian Kastner: My new favorite utility: autojump

Thursday 6th of August 2020 02:41:08 PM

Like any developer, I have amassed an impressive collection of directory trees both broad and deep. Navigating these trees became increasingly cumbersome, and setting CDPATH, using auto-completion, and working with the readline history search alleviated this only somewhat.

Enter autojump, from the package of the same name.

Whatever magic it uses is unbelievably effective. I estimate that in at least 95% of my cases, typing j <name-fragment> changes to the directory I was actually thinking of.

Say I'm working on package scikit-learn. My clone of the Salsa repo is in ~/code/pkg-scikit-learn/scikit-learn. Changing to that directory is trivial, I only need to specify a name fragment:

$ j sci /home/christian/code/pkg-scikit-learn/scikit-learn christian@workstation:~/code/pkg-scikit-learn/scikit-learn

But what if I want to work on scikit-learn upstream, to prepare a patch, for example? That repo has been cloned to ~/code/github/scikit-learn. No problem at all, just add another name fragment:

$ j gi sci /home/christian/code/github/scikit-learn christian@workstation:~/code/github/scikit-learn

The magic, however, is most evident with directory trees I rarely enter. As in: I have a good idea of the directory name I wish to change to, but I don't really recall its exact name, nor where (in the tree) it is located. I used to rely on autocomplete to somehow get there which can involve hitting the [TAB] key far too many times, and falling back to find in the worst case, but now, autojump always seems gets me there on first try.

I can't believe that this has been available in Debian for 10 years and I only discovered it now.

Sam Hartman: Good Job Debian: Compatibility back to 1999

Thursday 6th of August 2020 12:54:58 PM
So, I needed a container of Debian Slink (2.1), released back in 1999. I expected this was going to be a long and involved process. Things didn't look good from the start:
root@mount-peerless:/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/sqlalchemy# debootstrap slink /build/slink2 http://archive.debian.org/debian E: No such script: /usr/share/debootstrap/scripts/slink
Hmm, I thought I remembered slink support for debootstrap--not that slink used debootstrap by default--back when I was looking through the debootstrap sources years ago. Sure enough looking through the changelogs, slink support was dropped back in 2005.
Okay, well, this isn't going to work either, but I guess I could try debootstrapping sarge and from there go back to slink.
Except it worked fine.
Go us!

Holger Levsen: 20200805-debconf7

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 10:27:00 PM
DebConf7

This tshirt is 13 years old and from DebConf7.

DebConf7 was my 5th DebConf and took place in Edinburgh, Scotland.

And finally I could tell people I was a DD Though as you can guess, that's yet another story to be told. So anyway, Edinburgh.

I don't recall exactly whether the video team had to record 6 or 7 talk rooms on 4 floors, but this was probably the most intense set up we ran. And we ran a lot, from floor to floor, and room to room.

DebConf7 was also special because it had a very special night venue, which was in an ex-church in a rather normal building, operated as sort of community center or some such, while the old church interior was still very much visible as in everything new was build around the old stuff.

And while the night venue was cool, it also ment we (video team) had no access to our machines over night (or for much of the evening), because we had to leave the university over night and the networking situation didn't allow remote access with the bandwidth needed to do anything video.

The night venue had some very simple house rules, like don't rearrange stuff, don't break stuff, don't fix stuff and just a few little more and of course we broke them in the best possible way: Toresbe with the help of people I don't remember fixed the organ, which was broken for decades. And so the house sounded in some very nice new old tune and I think everybody was happy we broke that rule.

I believe the city is really nice from the little I've seen of it. A very nice old town, a big castle on the hill I'm not sure whether I missed the day trip to Glasgow to fix video things or to rest or both...

Another thing I missed was getting a kilt, for which Phil Hands made a terrific design (update: the design is called tartan and was made by Phil indeed!), which spelled Debian in morse code. That was pretty cool and the kilts are really nice on DebConf group pictures since then. And if you've been wearing this kilt regularily for the last 13 years it was probably also a sensible investment.

It seems I don't have that many more memories of this DebConf, British power plugs and how to hack them comes to my mind and some other stuff here and there, but I remember less than previous years. I'm blaming this on the intense video setup and also on the sheer amount of people, which was the hightest until then and for some years, I believe maybe even until Heidelberg 8 years later. IIRC there were around 470 people there and over my first five years of DebConf I was incredible lucky to make many friends in Debian, so I probably just hung out and had good times.

Holger Levsen: 20200805-debconf7.jpg

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 09:46:21 PM

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppCCTZ 0.2.8: Minor API Extension

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 01:25:00 AM

A new minor release 0.2.8 of RcppCCTZ is now on CRAN.

RcppCCTZ uses Rcpp to bring CCTZ to R. CCTZ is a C++ library for translating between absolute and civil times using the rules of a time zone. In fact, it is two libraries. One for dealing with civil time: human-readable dates and times, and one for converting between between absolute and civil times via time zones. And while CCTZ is made by Google(rs), it is not an official Google product. The RcppCCTZ page has a few usage examples and details. This package was the first CRAN package to use CCTZ; by now at least three others do—using copies in their packages which remains less than ideal.

This version adds three no throw variants of three existing functions, contributed again by Leonardo. This will be used in an upcoming nanotime release which we are finalising now.

Changes in version 0.2.8 (2020-08-04)
  • Added three new nothrow variants (for win32) needed by the expanded nanotime package (Leonardo in #37)

We also have a diff to the previous version thanks to CRANberries. More details are at the RcppCCTZ page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Holger Levsen: 20200804-debconf6

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 12:24:27 AM
DebConf6

This tshirt is 14 years old and from DebConf6.

DebConf6 was my 4th DebConf and took place in Oaxtepec, Mexico.

I'm a bit exhausted right now which is probably quite fitting to write something about DebConf6... many things in life are a question of perception, so I will mention the waterfall and the big swirl and the band playing with the fireworks during the conference dinner, the joy that we finally could use the local fiber network (after asking for months) just after discovering that the 6h shopping tour forgot to bring the essential pig tail connectors to connect the wireless antennas to the cards, which we needed to provide network to the rooms where the talks would take place.

DebConf6 was the first DebConf with live streaming using dvswitch (written by Ben Hutchings and removed from unstable in 2015 as the world had moved to voctomix, which is yet another story to be told eventually). The first years (so DebConf6 and some) the videoteam focussed on getting the post processing done and the videos released, and streaming was optional, even though it was an exciting new feature and we still managed to stream mostly all we recorded and sometimes more...

Setting up the network uplink also was very challenging and took, I don't remember exactly, until day 4 or 5 of DebCamp (which lasted 7 days), so there were group of geeks in need of network, and mostly unable to fix it, because for fixing it we needed to communicate and IRC was down. (There was no mobile phone data at that time, the first iphone wasn't sold yet, it were the dark ages.)

I remember literally standing on a roof to catch the wifi signal and excitingly shouting "I got one ping back! ... one ping back ...", less excitingly. I'll spare you the details now (and me writing them down) but I'll say that the solution involved Neil McGovern climbing an antenna and attaching a wifi antenna up high, probably 15m or 20m or some such. Finally we had uplink. I don't recall if that pig tail connector incident happened before of after, but in the end the network setup worked nicely on the wide area we occupied. Even though in some dorms the cleaning people daily removed one of our APs to be able to watch TV while cleaning (Which kind of was ok, but still... they could have plugged it back in.)

I also joyfully remember a certain vegetarian table, a most memorable bus ride (I'll just say 5 or rather cinco, and, unrelated except on the same bus ride, "Jesus" (and "Maria" for sure..)!) and talking with Jim Gettys and thus learning about the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) project.

As for any DebConf, there's sooo much more to be told, but I'll end here and just thank Gunnar Wolf (as he masterminded much of this DebConf) and go to bed now

Osamu Aoki: exim4 configuration for Desktop (better gmail support)

Tuesday 4th of August 2020 03:03:46 PM
Since gmail rewrites "From:" address now (2020) and keep changing access limitation, it is wise not  to use it as smarthost any more.  (If you need to access multiple gmail addresses from mutt etc, use esmtp etc.)
---For most of our Desktop PC running with stock exim4 and mutt, I think sending out mail is becoming a bit rough since using random smarthost causes lots of trouble due to the measures taken to prevent spams.

As mentioned in Exim4 user FAQ , /etc/hosts should have FQDN with external DNS resolvable domain name listed instead of localdomain to get the correct EHLO/HELO line.  That's the first step.

The stock configuration of exim4 only allows you to use single smarthost for all your mails.  I use one address for my personal use which is checked by my smartphone too.  The other account is for subscribing to the mailing list.  So I needed to tweak ...

Usually, mutt is smart enough to set the From address since my .muttrc has

# Set default for From: for replyes for alternates.
set reverse_name

So how can I teach exim4 to send mails depending on the  mail accounts listed in the From header.

For my gmail accounts, each mail should be sent to the account specific SMTP connection matching your From header to get all the modern SPAM protection data in right state.  DKIM, SPF, DMARC...  (Besides, they overwrite From: header anyway if you use wrong connection.)

For my debian.org mails, mails should be sent from my shell account on people.debian.org so it is very unlikely to be blocked.  Sometimes, I wasn't sure some of these debian.org mails sent through my ISP's smarthost are really getting to the intended person.

To these ends, I have created small patches to the /etc/exim4/conf.d files and reported it to Debian BTS: #869480 Support multiple smarthosts (gmail support).  These patches are for the source package.

To use my configuration tweak idea, you have easier route no matter which exim version you are using.  Please copy and read pertinent edited files from my github site to your installed /etc/exim4/conf.d files and get the benefits.
If you really wish to keep envelope address etc. to match From: header, please rewite agressively using the From: header using eddited rewrite/31_exim4-config_rewriting as follows:
.ifndef NO_EAA_REWRITE_REWRITE
*@+local_domains "${lookup{${local_part}}lsearch{/etc/email-addresses}\
                   {$value}fail}" f
# identical rewriting rule for /etc/mailname
*@ETC_MAILNAME "${lookup{${local_part}}lsearch{/etc/email-addresses}\
                   {$value}fail}" f
.endif
* "$h_from:" Frs

So far its working fine for me but if you find bug, let me know.

Osamu

Holger Levsen: 20200803-debconf5

Monday 3rd of August 2020 10:13:34 PM
DebConf5

This tshirt is 15 years old and from DebConf5. It still looks quite nice!

DebConf5 was my 3rd DebConf and took place in Helsinki, or rather Espoo, in Finland.

This was one of my most favorite DebConfs (though I basically loved them all) and I'm not really sure why, I guess it's because of the kind of community at the event. We stayed in some future dorms of the universtity, which were to be first used by some European athletics chamopionship and which we could use even before that, guests zero. Being in Finland there were of course saunas in the dorms, which we frequently used and greatly enjoyed. Still, one day we had to go on a trip to another sauna in the forest, because of course you cannot visit Finland and only see one sauna. Or at least, you should not.

Another aspect which increased community bonding was that we had to authenticate using 802.10 (IIRC, please correct me) which was an authentication standard mostly used for wireless but which also works for wired ethernet, except that not many had used it on Linux before. Thus quite some related bugs were fixed in the first days of DebCamp...

Then my powerpc ibook also decided to go bad, so I had to remove 30 screws to get the harddrive out and 30 screws back in, to not have 30 screws laying around for a week. Then I put the harddrive into a spare (x86) laptop and only used my /home partition and was very happy this worked nicely. And then, for travelling back, I had to unscrew and screw 30 times again. (I think my first attempt took 1.5h and the fourth only 45min or so Back home then I bought a laptop where one could remove the harddrive using one screw.

Oh, and then I was foolish during the DebConf5 preparations and said, that I could imagine setting up a team and doing video recordings, as previous DebConfs mostly didn't have recordings and the one that had, didn't have releases of them...

And so we did videos. And as we were mostly inexperienced we did them the hard way: during the day we recorded on tape and then when the talks were done, we used a postprocessing tool called 'cinelerra' and edited them. And because Eric Evans was on the team and because Eric worked every night almost all night, all nights, we managed to actually release them all when DebConf5 was over. I very well remember many many (23 or 42) Debian people cleaning the dorms thoroughly (as they were brand new..) and Eric just sitting somewhere, exhausted and watching the cleaners. And everybody was happy Eric was idling there, cause we knew why. In the aftermath of DebConf5 Ben Hutchings then wrote videolink (removed from sid in 2013) which we used to create video DVDs of our recordings based on a simple html file with links to the actual videos.

There were many more memorable events. The boat ride was great. A pirate flag appeared. One night people played guitar until very late (or rather early) close to the dorms, so at about 3 AM someone complained about it, not in person, but on the debian-devel mailinglist. And those drunk people playing guitar, replied immediatly on the mailinglist. And then someone from the guitar group gave a talk, at 9 AM, and the video is online... (It's a very slowwwwwww talk.)

If you haven't been to or close to the polar circles it's almost impossible to anticipate how life is in summer there. It get's a bit darker after midnight or rather after 1 AM and then at 3 AM it get's light again, so it's reaaaaaaally easy to miss the night once and it's absolutly not hard to miss the night for several nights in a row. And then I shared a room with 3 people who all snore quite loud...

There was more. I was lucky to witness the first (or second?) cheese and whine party which at that time took place in a dorm room with, dunno 10 people and maybe 15 kinds of cheese. And, of course, I met many wonderful people there, to mention a few I'll say Jesus, I mean mooch or data, Amaya and p2. And thanks to some bad luck which turned well, I also had my first time ever Sushi in Helsinki.

And and and. DebConfs are soooooooo good! I'll stop here as I originally planned to only write a paragraph or two about each and there are quite some to be written!

Oh, and as we all learned, there are probably no mosquitos in Helsinki, just in Espoo. And you can swim naked through a lake and catch a taxi on the other site, with no clothes and no money, no big deal. (And you might not believe it, but that wasn't me. I cannot swim that well.)

Giovanni Mascellani: Bye bye Python 2!

Monday 3rd of August 2020 07:00:00 PM

And so, today, while I was browsing updates for my Debian unstable laptop, I noticed that aptitude wouldn't automatically upgrade python2 and related packages (I don't know why, and at this point don't care). So I decided to dare: I removed the python2 package to see what the dependency solver would have proposed me. It turned out that there was basically nothing I couldn't live without.

So, bye bye Python 2. It was a long ride and I loved programming with you. But now it's the turn of your younger brother.

$ python bash: python: comando non trovato

(guess what "comando non trovato" means?)

And thanks to all those who made this possible!

Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - July 2020

Monday 3rd of August 2020 01:52:10 PM

Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

In July, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 25.25h for LTS (out of 30 max; all done) and 13.25h for ELTS (out of 20 max; all done).

We shifted suites: welcome Stretch LTS and Jessie ELTS. The LTS->ELTS switch happened at the start of the month, but the oldstable->LTS switch happened later (after finalizing and flushing proposed-updates to a last point release), causing some confusion but nothing major.

ELTS - Jessie

  • New local build setup
  • ELTS buildds: request timezone harmonization
  • Reclassify in-progress updates from jessie-LTS to jessie-ELTS
  • python3.4: finish preparing update, security upload ELA 239-1
  • net-snmp: global triage: bisect CVE-2019-20892 to identify affected version, jessie/stretch not-affected
  • nginx: global triage: clarify CVE-2013-0337 status; locate CVE-2020-11724 original patch and regression tests, update MITRE
  • nginx: security upload ELA-247-1 with 2 CVEs

LTS - Stretch

  • Reclassify in-progress/needed updates from stretch/oldstable to stretch-LTS
  • rails: upstream security: follow-up on CVE-2020-8163 (RCE) on upstream bug tracker and create pull request for 4.x (merged), hence getting some upstream review
  • rails: global security: continue coordinating upload in multiple Debian versions, prepare fixes for common stretch/buster vulnerabilities in buster
  • rails: security upload DLA-2282 fixing 3 CVEs
  • python3.5: security upload DLA-2280-1 fixing 13 pending non-critical vulnerabilities, and its test suite
  • nginx: security upload DLA-2283 (cf. common ELTS work)
  • net-snmp: global triage (cf. common ELTS work)
  • public IRC monthly team meeting
  • reach out to clarify the intro from last month's report, following unsettled feedback during meeting

Documentation/Scripts

  • ELTS/README.how-to-release-an-update: fix typo
  • ELTS buildd: attempt to diagnose slow perfs, provide comparison with Debian and local builds
  • LTS/Meetings: improve presentation
  • SourceOnlyUpload: clarify/de-dup pbuilder doc
  • LTS/Development: reference build logs URL, reference proposed-updates issue during dists switch, reference new-upstream-versioning discussion, multiple jessie->stretch fixes and clean-ups
  • LTS/Development/Asan: drop wheezy documentation
  • Warn about jruby mis-triage
  • Provide feedback for ksh/CVE-2019-14868
  • Provide feedback for condor update
  • LTS/TestsSuites/nginx: test with new request smuggling test cases

Enrico Zini: Toxic positivity links

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 10:00:00 PM
The Oppression of the Positivity Movement politics privilege archive.org 2020-08-03 “That which we do not bring to consciousness appears in our lives as fate.” — Carl Jung The Tyrannical Culture of Positivity health privilege archive.org 2020-08-03 Emotional support of others can take the form of surface-level consolation. But compassion means being willing to listen and feel, even when it's uncomfortable. How Positive Thinking Can Do More Harm Than Good health privilege archive.org 2020-08-03 Ultimately, the driving force behind the “power of positive thinking” meme is the word “power.” But what about those whose bodies are not powerful? What about those who are vulnerable? What about those who are tired, isolated, and struggling? What about those who are ill? What about those who lack Toxic Positivity - Tanglaw Mental Health — hindsight is so 2020 health privilege archive.org 2020-08-03 I have often been dismissive or unhelpful when someone close to me was dealing with painful circumstances, having learned to “accentuate the positive.” In the more recent past, I have recognized these behavioral patterns as part of what some mental health professionals term, “toxic positivity.” Toxic Positivity: The Dark Side of Positive Vibes health privilege archive.org 2020-08-03 Toxic positivity is the overgeneralization of a happy, optimistic state resulting in the denial & invalidation of the authentic human emotional experience.

Holger Levsen: 20200802-debconf4

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 05:40:54 PM
DebConf4

This tshirt is 16 years old and from DebConf4. Again, I should probably wash it at 60 celcius for once...

DebConf4 was my 2nd DebConf and took place in Porto Alegre, Brasil.

Like many DebConfs, it was a great opportunity to meet people: I remember sitting in the lobby of the venue and some guy asked me what I did in Debian and I told him about my little involvements and then asked him what he was doing, and he told me he wanted to become involved in Debian again, after getting distracted away. His name was Ian Murdock...

DebConf4 also had a very cool history session in the hallway track (IIRC, but see below) with Bdale Garbee, Ian Jackson and Ian Murdock and with a young student named Biella Coleman busy writing notes.

That same hallway also saw the kickoff meeting of the Debian Women project, though sadly today http://tinc.debian.net ("there's no cabal") only shows an apache placeholder page and not a picture of that meeting.

DebCon4 was also the first time I got a bit involved in preparing DebConf, together with Jonas Smedegaard I've set up some computers there, using FAI. I had no idea that this was the start of me contributing to DebConfs for text ten years.

And of course I also saw some talks, including one which I really liked, which then in turn made me notice there were no people doing video recordings, which then lead to something...

I missed the group picture of this one. I guess it's important to me to mention it because I've met very wonderful people at this DebConf... (some mentioned in this post, some not. You know who you are!)

Afterwards some people stayed in Porto Alegre for FISL, where we saw Lawrence Lessing present Creative Commons to the world for the first time. On the flight back I sat next to a very friendly guy from Poland and we talked almost the whole flight and then we never saw each other again, until 15 years later in Asia...

Oh, and then, after DebConf4, I used IRC for the first time. And stayed in the #debconf4 IRC channel for quite some years

Finally, DebConf4 and more importantly FISL, which was really big (5000 people?) and after that, the wizard of OS conference in Berlin (which had a very nice talk about Linux in different places in the world, illustrating the different states of 'first they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win'), made me quit my job at a company supporting Windows- and Linux-setups as I realized I'd better start freelancing with Linux-only jobs. So, once again, my life would have been different if I would not have attended these events!

Note: yesterdays post about DebConf3 was thankfully corrected twice. This might well happen to this post too!

Enrico Zini: Libreoffice presentation tips

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 01:00:00 PM
Snap guides

Dragging from the rulers does not always create snap guides. If it doesn't, click on the slide background, "Snap guides", "Insert snap guide". In my case, after the first snap guide was manually inserted, it was possible to drag new one from the rulers.

Master slides How to edit a master slide
  • Show master slides side pane
  • Right click on master slide
  • Edit Master...
  • An icon appears in the toolbar: "Close Master View"
  • Apply to all slides might not apply to the first slide created as the document was opened
Change styles in master slide

Do not change properties of text by selecting placeholder text in the Master View. Instead, open the Styles and formatting sidebar, and edit the styles in there.

This means the style changes are applied to pages in all layouts, not just the "Title, Content" layout that is the only one editable in the "Master View".

How to duplicate a master slide

There seems to be no feature implemented for this, but you can do it, if you insist:

  • Save a copy of the document
  • Rename the master slide
  • Drag a slide, that uses the renamed master slide, from the copy of the document to the original one

It's needed enough that someone made a wikihow: https://www.wikihow.com/Copy-a-LibreOffice-Impress-Master-Slide archive.org

How to change the master slide for a layout that is not "Title, Content"

I could not find a way to do it, but read on for a workaround.

I found an ask.libreoffice.org question that went unanswered.

I asked on #libreoffice on IRC and got no answer:

Hello. I'm doing the layout for a presentation in impress, and I can edit all sorts of aspects of the master slide. It seems that I can only edit the "Title, Content" layout of the master slide, though. I'd like to edit, for example, the "Title only" layout so that the title appears in a different place than the top of the page. Is it possible to edit specific layouts in a master page?

In the master slide editor it seems impossible to select a layout, for example.

Alternatively I tried creating multiple master slides, but then if I want to create a master slide for a title page, there's no way to remove the outline box, or the title box.

My work around has been to create multiple master slides, one for each layout. For a title layout, I moved the outline box into a corner, and one has to remove it manually after create a new slide.

There seems to be no way of changing the position of elements not found in the "Title, Content" layout, like "Subtitle". On the other hand, given that one's working with an entirely different master slide, one can abuse the outline box as a subtitle.

Note that if you later decide to change a style element for all the slides, you'll need to go propagate the change to the "Styles and Formatting" menu of all master slides you're using.

Andrew Cater: Debian 10.5 media testing - 202001082250 - last few debian-live images being tested for amd64 - Calamares issue - Post 5 of several.

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 12:59:49 PM
Last few debian-live images being tested for amd64. We have found a bug with the debian-live Gnome flavour. This specifically affects installs after booting from the live media and then installing to the machine using  the Calamares installer found on the desktop. The bug was introduced as a fix for one issue that has produced further buggy behaviour as a result.

Fixes are known - we've had highvoltage come and debug them with us - but will not be put out with this release but will wait for the 10.6 release which will allow for a longer time for debugging overall.
You can still run from the live-media, you can still install with the standard Debian installers found in the menu of the live-media disk - this is _only_ a limited time issue with the Calamares installer. At this point in the release cycle, it's been judged better to release the images as they are - with known and documented issues - than to try and debug them in a hurry and risk damaging or delaying a stable point release.

Enrico Zini: Gender, inclusive communities, and dragonflies

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 09:32:10 AM

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Sex_ratios:

Sex ratios

The sex ratio of male to female dragonflies varies both temporally and spatially. Adult dragonflies have a high male-biased ratio at breeding habitats. The male-bias ratio has contributed partially to the females using different habitats to avoid male harassment.

As seen in Hine's emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana), male populations use wetland habitats, while females use dry meadows and marginal breeding habitats, only migrating to the wetlands to lay their eggs or to find mating partners.

Unwanted mating is energetically costly for females because it affects the amount of time that they are able to spend foraging.

More in Tux Machines

Stable Kernels: 5.7.14, 5.4.57, 4.19.138, and 4.14.193

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    I'm announcing the release of the 5.7.14 kernel. All users of the 5.7 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.7.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.7.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

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