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KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.17, Qt 5.14 and more

Thursday 10th of October 2019 07:02:48 AM

It’s been way too long since the last blog post, so we’ve got quite a lot to report on!

Plasma 5.17 Beta

The Beta version of Plasma 5.17 was released with many new features and improvements such as per-screen fractional scaling on Wayland, a new User Interface (UI) for configuring permissions of Thunderbolt devices and network statistics in KSysGuard. The latter requires some more privileges than usual for a user application, so is currently being looked at by the SUSE security team.

openQA found a few bugs already, like GIMP looking more “colorful” than usual and some applications mixing Kirigami and Qt Widgets breaking some keyboard shortcuts. Both of those were addressed meanwhile and will be fixed in the final release of 5.17.

If you haven’t tested the Plasma 5.17 Beta yet, there’s still some time left! If you come across a problem in the software, please head over to the KDE bug tracker; if instead you find an issue that is openSUSE specific, go over to the openSUSE bugzilla.

To get it on your Leap or Tumbleweed installation, you can read https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:KDE_repositories.

In case you face some severe issues, the automatic snapshotting of the root filesystem using btrfs has your back and you can simply go back to the working state by booting into an older snapshot and doing a rollback.

Argon, an installable live medium that includes Leap 15.1 with the Beta and doesn’t require any manual repository addition, is also available.

openSUSE Leap 15.2

Like it happened for Leap 42.2, 15.2 will also see major version upgrades of many components.

Next to a new version of the Linux kernel, it’s planned to ship with Qt 5.12 LTS, Plasma 5.18 (of course also LTS) and the latest KDE Frameworks and Applications, which we can get in early enough for proper testing to ensure the best user experience possible!

This means that the “Full Wayland” session that landed in Tumbleweed a few weeks ago will also be available in Leap 15.2 and support per-screen fractional scaling.

As the target versions of Applications, Frameworks and Plasma aren’t even out yet, we’re currently integrating Qt 5.12 LTS with the latest packages from Factory.

Qt 5.14

Users of Tumbleweed and Leap with newer KDE software are used to having the latest available features and bugfixes, which is only possible by keeping up with Qt development and acting proactively.

So while the 5.14 branch of Qt is still young, we’re already busy integrating it into our builds. During the initial packaging of the 5.14 Alpha some bugs (QTBUG-78867, QTBUG-78881, QTBUG-78911, QTBUG-78948) were already identified and most of them fixed by now, so the KDE:Qt:5.14 project is built and usable by now. To develop against Qt 5.14 and test your applications with it, you can add the repo and get started.

So far it’s still in the phase of integration and getting everything in shape to build against it, but soon we’ll submit it to the Factory staging area to see how it behaves in there.

One of the most user visible features is that the implementation for scaling (for HiDPI displays) was mostly rewritten. Other noteworthy changes are the addition of various backends for hardware acceleration of Qt Quick using a new abstraction layer (opt-in), which can now also take advantage of Vulkan and introduction of a new “qtquicktimeline” module, which allows for easier integration of timeline-driven animations into Qt Quick.

Sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit Concludes

Monday 7th of October 2019 02:45:35 PM

The openSUSE community concluded its sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit this weekend at the Fakultas Teknik of the Universitas Udayana in Bali, Indonesia.

Bali’s newest tourist attraction, the Garuda Wisnu Kencana status, towered outside the window as participants discussed all things openSUSE and open source.

A number of participants traveled from all over the world to join students from the university. The students volunteered with running the summit and many made their first contributions to open source. Attendees from more than 20 nations attended the summit. Talks at the summit focused on open source technologies, community contributions, healthcare technologies like GNU Health, packaging, using the Open Build Service and much more.

openSUSE Asia Summit 2019 #oSAS19 @openSUSEID @openSUSE pic.twitter.com/EjMtLi6Jb9

— Klmpk Linux Arek Sby (@KLAS_Activity) October 5, 2019

Simon Lee and Dr. Axel Braun from the openSUSE Board provided attendees with a status update about the openSUSE Project and introduced Gerald Pfeifer as the new chairperson for openSUSE. GNOME‘s Executive Director Neil McGovern gave a keynote at the summit; the GNOME.Asia Summit will be next week in East Java, which is the island next to where the openSUSE.Asia Summit took place.

The organizers from the opensuse.id community put together a fantastic summit for the participants had several social events to collaborate on topics related to the project and expansion of the project and open source technologies within Asia. The project and attendees expressed their thanks to sponsors who helped to maked the summit a success. SUSE, Simplify8, Radiant Utama Interinsco TBKMyCoop, PT Boer Technology, Excellent, Bogorwebhost, Linksys, Fans.co.id

The openSUSE.Asia Summit started a tradition at the first openSUSE.Asia Summit of passing along the Summit’s photo album; the organizing team from the previous year passes the Summit’s photo album to the organizers who are completing the current Summit. Max Huang passed the album to Kukuh Syafaat during the ceremonial end of the summit.

A really great tradition with the @openSUSE.Asia Summit; the organizing team from the previous year passes the Summit’s photo album to the organizers who are completing this year’s Summit. pic.twitter.com/57lzBCctp3

— openSUSE Linux (@openSUSE) October 6, 2019

That wasn’t the only ceremony. The conference started off with a ceremonial dance and opening remarks from the university’s staff.

Well, that’s a pretty amazing way of opening a conference! @openSUSE @openSUSEID #oSAS19 pic.twitter.com/FEIMkxPMgB

— Neil McGovern (@nmcgovern) October 5, 2019

Next year’s openSUSE.Asia Summit is planned to take place in Faridabad, India.

Election Committee Set to Open Vote on Project Name

Monday 30th of September 2019 05:51:50 AM

Following discussions about the “openSUSE Project logo & name change” that started in June on the openSUSE Project mailing list [1], the Election Committee received a request from the Board to conduct a vote whereby openSUSE members can indicate whether they are for or against the project name change.

The voting will start on Oct. 10 and end on Oct. 31, which will provide three weeks for members to vote. The result will be announced on Nov. 1.

The voting exercise is limited to openSUSE members only.

The voting procedure will be similar to the board elections. Members will receive a voting link on their membership email alias, i.e @opensuse.org. Members should verify that their openSUSE email alias is working and redirecting to the correct email address. If you experience troubles with your email alias, please email admin@opensuse.org to resolve the issue.

Members who wish to change the target address of their email alias can do so by creating a ticket. That can be done by sending the change request to admin@opensuse.org.

Those who wish to become an openSUSE member they can apply for membership by following the instructions specified on the openSUSE Wiki page [2].

The Election Committee can be reached through election-officials@opensuse.org.

[1] https://lists.opensuse.org/opensuse-project/2019-06/

[2] https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Members

Co-Conference Logo Competition for 2020

Friday 27th of September 2019 06:29:40 AM

The LibreOffice and openSUSE communities will have a joint conference next year in Nuremberg, Germany, and for this special co-conference, we are having a logo competition. The dates of the event are still being finalized, but there are some things we can do beforehand.

A logo is essential for the conference and we want to visualize both communities during this co-conference as LibreOffice will celebrate its 10-year anniversary and openSUSE will celebrate its 15-year anniversary during the conference.

The LibOcon logo should not be confused with the LibreOffice 10th anniversary logo contest, which will be announced separately via the LibreOffice blog.

You have seen both the openSUSE Conference logo and LibOcon logo change over the years. For this unique co-conference, we would like to have a unique logo reflecting both communities in one logo.

The competition is open now and ends on January, 17, 2020. The organizing team will send “Mystery Box” as an appreciation for the best logo designed. This year, logo will be voted on by the organizers of the conference.

Deadline: 17 January 2020 UTC 13:00

Announcement Winner: 1 Feb. 2020 at FOSDEM

The Rules of the Contest are as follows:

  • The logo should be licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 and allow everyone to use the logo without attribution (BY) if your work is used as the logo of LibOcon/oSC20. Note that the attribution is going to be shown on the conference website.
  • Design must be original and should not include any third party materials.
  • Both monochromes and color formats are essential for submission.
  • Submissions must be in SVG format.
  • Design should reflect the LibreOffice and openSUSE communities.
  • The logo should avoid the following things:
    • Brand names or trademarks of any kind.
    • Illustrations that may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
    • Sexually explicit or provocative images.
    • Violence or weapons.
    • Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery.
    • Discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
    • Bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals
    • Religious, political, or nationalist imagery.
  • The logo should follow the “LibreOffice Branding Guidelines” and the “openSUSE Project Trademark Guidelines” published respectively at https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Marketing/Branding and https://en.opensuse.org/File:OpenSUSE_Trademark_Guidelines.pdf
  • The branding guidelines will be helpful to design your logo (optional)
    https://opensuse.github.io/branding-guidelines/

Please submit your design to ddemaio@opensuse.org with the following entries:

  • Subject: Co-Conference Logo Design 2020  – [your name]
  • Your name and mail address to contact
  • A document about philosophy of the design (txt or pdf)
  • Vector file of the design with SVG format ONLY.
  • Bitmap of design in attachment — image size: 256*256 px at least, PNG format.
  • File size less than 512 KB.

The co-conference organizing team will decide on the logos, which is subject to the conditions that the logo meets all the requirements. The final decision will be made by the co-conference organizing team and it may not be the highest scored design.

We recommend the artist to use Inkscape, a powerful, free and open source vector graphics tool for all kinds of design.

Tumbleweed Snapshots Trending High with Bash, PulseAudio, Curl Updates

Thursday 26th of September 2019 07:11:37 AM

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week brought about two dozen new versions of software.

The snapshots brought one new major version update for pulseaudio and an updated version of bash.

The major version update to pulseaudio 13.0 came in Snapshot 20190921. The sound server program improved the initial card profile selection for Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) cards and improved the play 5.1 surround audio that now treats both “side” or “rear” channels identically when the user has a 5.1 speaker setup; the 7.1 setup still has a difference which channel pair gets used. The libreoffice 6.3.2.2 package had some stability tweaks and addressed two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), which one had an unsafe URL assembly flaw. The cabextract program that un-archives files in the Microsoft cabinet file format modernized the spec file in its 1.9.1 version. Another package updated in the snapshot was osinfo-db, which is a package that provides a database of information about operating systems for virtualization provisioning tools. The snapshot is trending at a stable rating of 95, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The 20190920 snapshot is also trending at a stable rating of 95. This snapshot updated bash from version 5.0 to 5.0.11. The minor update to bash change posix mode behavior. The Mesa 3D graphics library 19.1.7. The update fixed a KWin compositor crashes on launch as well as a few other bugs. Command line tool and library curl 7.66.0 added experimental feature for HTTP/3 that is disabled by default but can be enabled and works, according to this tutorial from Daniel Stenberg. Two CVEs were also fixed with the curl update. The 26.3 version of the emacs text editors has a newly assigned codepoint U+32FF that was added to the Unicode Character Database compiled into Emacs, which now supports the new Japanese Era name. Software development tool swig 4.0.1 added Python 3.8 support and fixed some minor regressions that were introduced in the 4.0.0 major release. An updated version of plymouth added a time delay of 8 seconds to fit an AMD graphics card for graphical boot animation.

The snapshot that started off the week, 20190918, brought an update for Mozilla Thunderbird. The mail clients 68.1.0 squashed bugs like a car speeding on the autobahn on a muggy day; A total of six CVEs were addressed in the update including CVE-2019-11739, which allowed for a Covert Content Attack on S/MIME encryption using a crafted multipart/alternative message. File searching utility catfish 1.4.10 added some new features and improved the application menu to make better use of space, padding, and margins. The snapshot is recorded a moderately stable rating of 90, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Firefox, Graphene, Krita update in Tumbleweed

Thursday 19th of September 2019 11:02:57 AM

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

The snapshots furnished the update for KDE Applications 19.08.1 and updated several libraries including Intel’s Graphene library OS.

Snapshot 20190917 delivered four packages. The Graphene package updated to 1.10.0 and now uses an ancillary library called (micro) µTest for its test suite, which makes possible to build and run the test suite without depending on GLib. Mozilla Firefox 69.0 provided Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) with stronger privacy protections and added support for receiving multiple video codecs to makes it easier for WebRTC conferencing services to mix video from different clients. The other two package updates in the snapshot were icecream 1.3, which takes compile jobs from a build and distributes it among remote machines allowing a parallel build, and the HTTP client/server library for GNOME libsoup 2.66.3. The update of  icecream 1.3 improved the speed of creating compiler tarballs. The snapshot is trending at a moderately stable rating of 87, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The 20190916 snapshot finished the updates of KDE Applications 19.08.1, which were in the previous week’s snapshots. The 5.2.14 version of the Linux Kernel had some fixes for Ceph buffers and Advanced Linux Sound Architecture. The graphics editor written in Qt, Krita 4.2.6 had several fixes and added a new layer from visible to layer right-click context menu. Among the most key libraries updated in the snapshot were an update to glib2 2.60.7, which fixed more than a handful of bugs; libvirt 5.7.0, which added apparmor-abstractions as a required package for daemon; and gtk3 3.24.11, which added Wayland support for xdg-output v3 and has improved the monitoring of metadata with X11. The User Interface manager for GTK, amtk updated it’s first five series minor release to 5.0.1 that fixed a small new compilation warning. Rendering engine webkit2gtk3 2.26.0 added support for HSTS (HTTP Strict Transport Security). The only major release to come in the snapshot was perl-HTML-Clean  1.2 from version 0.9. Other notable packages updated in the snapshot were flatpak-builder 1.0.8, texinfo 6.6 and virtualbox 6.0.12 that fixed a potential crash when using the medium Input/Output functionality of VBoxManage. The snapshot is trending at a moderately stable rating of 80, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Applications, PostgreSQL, Zypper Packages Update in Tumbleweed

Friday 13th of September 2019 03:08:00 PM

The past week produced four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots.

The snapshots brought an update of KDE Plasma and Applications along with an update for the input framework ibus, two PostgreSQL versions and the command line package manager zypper.

KDE Applications 19.08.1 improvements to Kontact, Dolphin, Kdenlive, Konsole, Step, and more arrived in snapshot 20190909. Several regressions in Konsole’s tab handling were fixed and olphin again starts correctly when in split-view mode. The updated of the anti-virus package clamav 0.101.4 address two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. The GNOME web browser package epiphany 3.32.5 fixed a memory corruption and broken web process extension connection when using WebKit trunk. An update of links 2.20.1 brought stability improvements and also addressed a bug when connected with tor would send real dns requests outside the tor network when the displayed page contains link elements with rel=dns-prefetch. The Plasma desktop received a minor update to 5.16.5 and fixed KWayland-integration builds with recent frameworks and Qt 5.13. Some notifications were changed in the new minor version and the some functionality was improved for current weather conditions. The qrencode 4.0.2 package improved support for cmake. The snapshot was trending at a rating of 84, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Multiple packages arrived in snapshot 20190907, which was also trending at a rating of 84. An update of ImageMagick 7.0.8.63 properly identifies the DNG and AI image format. About 15 CVE’s were addressed in the update of Mozilla Firefox to version 68.1.0, which included a fix for type confusion in Mozilla’s JavaScript engine Spidermonkey. An update for the Wayland input-method protocol was made in ibus 1.5.21 and improved Single Instruction, Multiple Data (SIMD) decoding of 24 bit files was made with the Free Lossless Audio Codec (flac) 1.3.3 package update. Improved performance of various Application Program Interface (API) such as JSON.parse and methods called on frozen arrays were made with the nodejs12 12.10.0 update and php7 7.3.9 provided a bug fixing release that fixed an Exchangeable image file format (Exif) crash (bus error) due to wrong alignment and invalid cast. Many other libraries were updated in the snapshot including a couple YaST packages.

More than half a dozen packages were updated in the 20190905 snapshot. Among the most notable packages in the snapshot were kdevelop5 5.4.2 and iproute2 5.2, which Use FAT link-time optimization (LTO) objects in order to provide proper static library. The mozilla-nss 3.45 added support for the Elbrus lcc compiler in the snapshot and both postgresql10 10.10 and postgresql11 11.5 were updated. The snapshot recorded a moderately stable rating of 83, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The snapshot that started off the week, 20190904, provided an update to libktorrent 2.1.1 that fixed HTTP seeding and libgnome-games-support 1.4.4, libusb-1_0 1.0.23, webkit2gtk3 2.24.4 and yast2 4.2.19 were all updated. The command line package manager zypper also updated in the snapshot to version 1.14.30, which dumps stack trace on broken pipe SIGPIPE. The snapshot recorded a stable rating of 93, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Multiple YaST Packages, Major Versions of Gawk, Swig Update in Tumbleweed

Thursday 5th of September 2019 12:07:37 PM

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

The snapshots brought two new major versions and two Linux Kernel updates.

Snapshot 20190902 brought the second Linux Kernel update for the week with an update of kernel 5.2.11; the new kernel brought several fixes for ASoC audio drivers. The snapshot also provided an updated version of Ceph to address a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures.The IRC Client irssi 1.2.2 version fixed a crash and libreoffice 6.3.1.1 removed some patches. The updated libsolv 0.7.6 fixed repository priority handling for multiversion packages and the network discovery and security auditing utility nmap 7.80 resolved a compatibility issue with OpenSSL library configured with security level 2. Qt4 support was removed with the polkit-qt5-1 version 0.113.0. MicroOS integration tests and an added required cryptomount coding for EFI boot were added with core appliance builder python-kiwi 9.18.12. The interface compiler connecting programs written in C and C++ with scripting languages, Swig, received the 4.0 update in the snapshot; the new major version improves support for parsing C++11 and C++14 code and removes php5 support. Several YaST packages updated the name type X-SuSE-YaST-AutoInstResource. The snapshot is trending at a rating of 88, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190829 updated three packages. The three package updates were freeipmi 1.6.4, texlive-specs-m and texlive-specs-n. The snapshot recorded a moderate rating of 90, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Mesa 19.1.5 arrived in snapshot 20190828 and provided some bug fixes. Mozilla browser Firefox had a minor update to 68.0.2 and provided a fix that cut off some images that weren’t displaying on Google Maps as well as a fix for special characters there were being cut off from the end of the search terms. KDE music player amarok received an update to version 2.9.70 and re-added the gstreamer-plugins-ugly. The 3.7.3 version of ccache corrected the cache size on filesystems that use more or less disk blocks than conventional filesystems. A compiler warning was fixed in e2fsprogs 1.45.3. A major version release of gawk 5.0.1 was in the snapshot; the pattern searcher makes some stronger assumptions about a C99 environment and adds support for the POSIX standard %a and %A printf formats. There was an update for GNU Compiler Collection from 9.1.1 to 9.2.1 and a patch was added to make symbols for aggregated global constructor names stable when using Link Time Optimization (LTO). Improvements to User Interface, workflow and features were made with the update of git 2.23.0. This snapshot provided the first kernel update of the week with kernel 5.2.10. Several translations were made with the libstorage-ng 4.2.2 update and text editor nano 4.4 made a change on startup to allow the cursor to be put on the first or last occurrence of a string by preceding the filename with +/string or +?string. The welcome window for openSUSE received more translations for global users with an update of the opensuse-welcome 0.1.6 package and several YaST packages were updated for the handling multiple versions of Ruby versions by updating tags in the spec file. The snapshot recorded a moderate rating of 81, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

MariaDB, VLC, Plopper, Apache Packages Update in Tumbleweed

Thursday 29th of August 2019 08:01:34 AM

There have been three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week.

The snapshots brought new versions of VLC, Apache, Plopper and an update of the Linux Kernel.

Snapshot 20190824 delivered a  fix that was made to the swirl option, which produced an unexpected result, with the update of ImageMagick’s 7.0.8.61 version. Improved adaptive streaming and a fix for stuttering for low framerate videos became available in VLC 3.0.8; 13 issues, including 5 buffer overflows we fixed and 11 Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures were assigned and addressed in the media player version. More than a handful of CVEs were addressed with the apache2 2.4.41 update. One of the CVEs addressed was that of a malicious client that could perform a Denial of Services attack by flooding a connection with requests and basically never reading responses on the TCP connection. The new version also improves the balancer-manager protection against XSS/XSRF attacks from trusted users. The x86 emulation library fixed a compiler warning in the 2.4 version and the X11 RandR utility updated the geometry text file configure.ac for gitlab migration with the xrandr 1.5.1 version. The snapshot is trending at a rating of 86, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The HP Linux Imaging and Printing package hplip 3.19.6 added support for several new color and enterprise printer, which was released in snapshot 20190823. The Linux Kernel was updated to version 5.2.9 and offered more than a handful of commits for the Direct Rendering Manager for AMD hardware and offered some memory leak bugs related to the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture. The utility library for rendering PDFs, poppler, also fixed some memory allocation in the PostScriptFunction with version 0.79.0; the version also fixed regressions on TextSelectionPainter. Minor updates were also made in the snapshot for xfce4-settings 4.14.1 and yast2-fonts 4.2.1, yast2-instserver 4.2.3 and yast2-support 4.2.2 all had changes related to a newer Ruby version. The snapshot is trending at a rating of 84, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The first snapshot of the week, 20190822, updated five packages. MariaDB’s 10.3.17 package had the most changes in the snapshot and provided merge relevant storage engine changes from MySQL 5.7.27 as well as five CVE fixes. Small bug fixes and fuzzer fixes were made to libetonyek 0.1.9. GNOME’s photo manager shotwell 0.30.7 fix compatibility with programming language Vala 0.46. The other two package updates were libsrtp2  2.2.0 and rubygem-sassc 2.1.0. The snapshot recorded a rating of 78, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Xfce 4.14 Lands in Tumbleweed

Friday 23rd of August 2019 04:18:59 PM

Ahoy! openSUSE Xfce team is pleased to announce that the long awaited Xfce 4.14 has been released for Tumbleweed.

After a long development cycle (4 years!), all of the core components and applications have been ported to GTK 3.

Among the main new features and improvements, the xfwm4 window manager has finally gained support for VSync, HiDPI, hardware GLX and various compositor improvements.

You can check out the neat new features in the official Xfce 4.14 tour and the official release announcement.

openSUSE Changes

For openSUSE, we continued to polish the default experience by adding new packages that complete the desktop and make it more approachable to new users.

We:

– Switched to xfce4-screensaver, the new Xfce screenlocker, from xscreensaver

– Added xfce4-panel-profiles, a tool to back up and restore your panel layout configuration as well as layout presets

– Added mugshot, a tool to easily input personal information and a user avatar. It is integrated into the Whisker Menu

– Added lightdm-gtk-greeter-settings, a tool to easily configure LightDM

– Added gnome-disk-utility, a disk management tool that allows you to partition disks and mount ISO files

New GTK Theme

In the process of updating to Xfce 4.14, we decided that we wanted to have our very own GTK theme. Thus, Greybird Geeko was born.

Based on the popular Greybird Xfce theme, Greybird Geeko is an official spin with an openSUSE look & feel and other improvements, such as a dark variant of the theme. 

A special shout out to Carson Black who carried out the work and maintains this theme! For a quick overview, please check out the screenshots.

A big “thank you” to everyone who got involved in this release! 

More information about Xfce on openSUSE is available at https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Xfce.

Changing the Chair of the openSUSE Board

Monday 19th of August 2019 10:27:12 AM

Dear Community,

After six years on the openSUSE Board and five as its Chairperson, I have decided to step down as Chair of the openSUSE Board effective today, August 19.

This has been a very difficult decision for me to make, with reasons that are diverse, interlinked, and personal.
Some of the key factors that led me to make this step include the time required to do the job properly, and the length of time I’ve served.
Five years is more than twice as long as any of my predecessors.
The time required to do the role properly has increased and I now find it impossible to balance the demands of the role with the requirements of my primary role as a developer in SUSE, and with what I wish to achieve outside of work and community.
As difficult as it is to step back from something I’ve enjoyed doing for so long, I am looking forward to achieving a better balance between work, community, and life in general.

Serving as member and chair of the openSUSE Board has been an absolute pleasure and highly rewarding. Meeting and communicating with members of the project as well as championing the cause of openSUSE has been a joyous part of my life that I know I will miss going forward.

openSUSE won’t get rid of me entirely. While I do intend to step back from any governance topics, I will still be working at SUSE in the Future Technology Team. Following SUSE’s Open Source policy, we do a lot in openSUSE. I am especially looking forward to being able to focus on Kubic & MicroOS much more than I have been lately.

As I’m sure it’s likely to be a question, I wish to make it crystal clear that my decision has nothing to do with the Board’s ongoing efforts to form an independent openSUSE Foundation.

The Board’s decision to form a Foundation had my complete backing as Chairperson, and will continue to have as a regular openSUSE contributor.
I have absolute confidence in the openSUSE Board; Indeed, I don’t think I would be able to make this decision at this time if I wasn’t certain that I was leaving openSUSE in good hands.

On that note, SUSE has appointed Gerald Pfeifer as my replacement as Chair. Gerald is SUSE’s EMEA-based CTO, with a long history as a Tumbleweed user, an active openSUSE Member, and upstream contributor/maintainer in projects like GCC  and Wine.

Gerald has been a regular source of advice & support during my tenure as Chairperson. In particular, I will always remember my first visit to FOSDEM as openSUSE Chair.
Turning up more smartly dressed than usual, I was surprised to find Gerald, a senior Director at SUSE, diving in to help at the incredibly busy openSUSE booth, and doing so dressed in quite possibly the oldest and most well-loved openSUSE T-shirt I’ve ever seen.
When booth visitors came with questions about SUSE-specific stuff, I think he took some glee in being able to point them in my direction while teasingly saying “Richard is the corporate guy here, I’m just representing the community..”

Knowing full well he will continue being so community minded, while finally giving me the opportunity to tease him in return, it is with a similar glee I now hand over the reigns to Gerald.

As much as I’m going to miss things about being chairperson of this awesome community, I’m confident and excited to see how openSUSE evolves from here.

Keep having a lot of fun,

Richard

Note: This announcement has been cross-posted in several places, but please send any replies and discussion to the opensuse-project@opensuse.org Mailinglist. Thanks!

Kata Containers Packages are Available officially in openSUSE Tumbleweed

Saturday 17th of August 2019 04:22:30 PM

Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

What is Kata

As already mentioned, Kata is a container runtime focusing on security and on ease of integration with the existing containers ecosystem. If you are wondering what’s a container runtime, this blog post by Sascha will give you a clear introduction about the topic.

Kata should be used when running container images whose source is not fully trusted, or when allowing other users to run their own containers on your platform.

Traditionally, containers share the same physical and operating system (OS) resources with host processes, and specific kernel features such as namespaces are used to provide an isolation layer between host and container processes. By contrast, Kata containers run inside lightweight virtual machines, adding an extra isolation and security layer, that minimizes the host attack surface and mitigates the consequences of containers breakout. Despite this extra layer, Kata achieves impressive runtime performances thanks to KVM hardware virtualization, and when configured to use a minimalist virtual machine manager (VMM) like Firecracker, a high density of microVM can be packed on a single host.

If you want to know more about Kata features and performances:

  • katacontainers.io is a great starting point.
  • For something more SUSE oriented, Flavio gave a interesting talk about Kata at SUSECON 2019,
  • Kata folks hang out on katacontainers.slack.com, and will be happy to answer any quesitons.
Why is it important for Kubic and openSUSE

SUSE has been an early and relevant open source contributor to containers projects, believing that this technology is the future way of deploying and running software.

The most relevant example is the openSUSE Kubic project, that’s a certified Kubernetes distribution and a set of container-related technologies built by the openSUSE community.

We have also been working for some time in well known container projects, like runC, libpod and CRI-O, and since a year we also collaborate with Kata.

Kata complements other more popular ways to run containers, so it makes sense for us to work on improving it and to assure it can smoothly plug with our products.

How to use

While Kata may be used as a standalone piece of software, its intended use is to serve as a runtime when integrated in a container engine like Podman or CRI-O.

This section shows a quick and easy way to spin up a Kata container using Podman on openSUSE Tumbleweed.

First, install the Kata packages:

$ sudo zypper in katacontainers

Make sure your system is providing the needed set of hardware virtualization features required by Kata:

$ sudo kata-runtime kata-check

If no errors are reported, great! Your system is now ready to run Kata Containers.

If you haven’t already, install podman with:

$ sudo zypper in podman

That’ all. Try running a your first Kata container with:

$ sudo podman run -it --rm --runtime=/usr/bin/kata-runtime opensuse/leap uname -a Linux ab511687b1ed 5.2.5-1-kvmsmall #1 SMP Wed Jul 31 10:41:36 UTC 2019 (79b6a9c) x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux Differences with runC

Now that you have Kata up and running, let’s see some of the differences between Kata and runC, the most popular container runtime.

When starting a container with runC, container processes can be seen in the host processes tree:

... 10212 ? Ssl 0:00 /usr/lib/podman/bin/conmon -s -c <ctr-id> -u <ctr-id> 10236 ? Ss 0:00 \_ nginx: master process nginx -g daemon off; 10255 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process 10256 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process 10257 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process 10258 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process ...

With Kata, container processes are instead running in a dedicated VM, so they are not sharing OS resources with the host:

... 10651 ? Ssl 0:00 /home/marco/go/src/github.com/containers/conmon/bin/conmon -s -c <ctr-id> -u <ctr-id> 10703 ? Sl 0:01 \_ /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 -name sandbox-<ctr-id> -uuid e54ee910-2927-456e-a180-836b92ce5e7a -machine pc,accel=kvm,kernel_ir 10709 ? Ssl 0:00 \_ /usr/lib/kata-containers/kata-proxy -listen-socket unix:///run/vc/sbs/<ctr-id>/proxy.sock -mux-socket /run/vc/vm/829d8fe0680b 10729 ? Sl 0:00 \_ /usr/lib/kata-containers/kata-shim -agent unix:///run/vc/sbs/<ctr-id>/proxy.sock -container <ctr-id> ... Future plans

We are continuing to work to offer you a great user experience when using Kata on openSUSE by:

  • improving packages quality and stability,
  • delivering periodic releases,
  • making sure that Kata well integrates with the other container projects, like Podman and CRI-O.

As a longer term goal, we will integrate Kata in the Kubic distribution and in CaaSP, to make them some of the most complete and secure solutions to manage containers.

 

Originally published at https://github.com/kubic-project/kubic-o-o/blob/master/blog/_posts/2019-08-14-kata-in-tumbleweed.md

New 4.0.2 Version of Uyuni is Released

Friday 2nd of August 2019 05:40:43 PM

Contributors of Uyuni Project have released a new version of Uyuni 4.0.2, which is an open-source infrastructure management solution tailored for software-defined infrastructure.

Uyuni, a fork of the Spacewalk project, modernizing Spacewalk with SaltStack, provides more operating systems support and better scalability capabilities. Uyuni is now the upstream for SUSE Manager.

With this release, Uyuni provides powerful new features such as monitoring, content lifecycle management and virtual machine management.

Both the Uyuni Server node and the optional proxy nodes work on top of openSUSE Leap 15.1 and support Leap 15.1, CentOS, Ubuntu and others as clients. Debian support is experimental. The new version of Uyuni uses Salt 2019.2, Grafana 6.2.5, Cobbler 3.0 and Python 3.6 in the backend.

“The upgrade involves the complete replacement of the underlying operating system,” according to a post on July 9 by Hubert Mantel on Github. “This is a very critical operation and it is impossible to handle any potential failure in a graceful way. For example, an error during upgrade of the base OS might lead to a completely broken system which cannot be recovered.

Given that the upgrade of Uyuni also involves upgrading the base operating system from Leap 42.3 to Leap 15.1, it is highly advisable to create a backup of the server before running the migration. If the Uyuni server is running in a virtual machine, it is recommended to take a snapshot of the machine before running the migration.

Migration is performed by first updating the susemanager package:

zypper ref && zypper in susemanager

Then run the migration script:

/usr/lib/susemanager/bin/server-migrator.sh

“This script will stop the services, subscribe the new software repositories and finally perform the actual update to the new version,” Mantel wrote on Github. “After successful migration, services will not be started automatically. The system needs to be rebooted and this will also re-start all the services. There is nothing additional the admin needs to do.”

The intention of the fork was to provide new inspiration to a Spacewalk, which had been perceived as idling in recent years. Uyuni is using Salt for configuration management, thereby inheriting its name: Uyuni refers to the world’s largest Salt flat, Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia.

Interested members can follow the project on https://github.com/uyuni-project, www.uyuni-project.org, via Twitter at @UyuniProject, or join #uyuni at irc.freenode.org.

Mesa, ImageMagick, Plasma, Frameworks Update in Tumbleweed

Thursday 1st of August 2019 09:39:20 AM

There have been three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released since last week.

The snapshots brought a single major version update and new versions of KDE’s Plasma and Frameworks.

ImageMagick’s 7.0.8.56 version arrived in snapshot 20190730 and added support for the TIM2 image format, which is commonly used in PlayStation 2 and sometimes in PlayStation Portable games. The snapshot also delivered an update for Mesa 3D Graphics Library with version 19.1.3 that mostly provided fixes for ANV and RADV drivers, as well as NIR backend fixes. File searching tool catfish 1.4.8 provided some fixes with directories and a fix running on Wayland. The GNU Compiler Collection 7 added a patch and fixed for a Link Time Optimization (LTO) linker plugin. The 9.0.1 glu, which is the OpenGL Utility library for Mesa, fixed a possible memory leak. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.2.3; the new version made a few fixes for PowerPC and added Bluetooth for some new devices. Serval Python packages were updated in the snapshot. LLVM tools and libraries were updated in Tumbleweed with llvm8 8.0.1 but the changelog states not to run LLVM tests on PowerPC because of sporadic hangs. The 2.4.7 version of openvpn in the snapshot added support for tls-ciphersuites for TLS 1.3 and updated openvpn.keyring with public key downloaded from https://swupdate.openvpn.net/community/keys/security-key-2019.asc. A lengthy list of fixes were made to the VIM text editor in version 8.1.1741. Other packages updated in the snapshot were ucode-intel 20190618, xapps 1.4.8, ypbind 2.6.1 and zstd 1.4.1. The snapshot is trending as moderately stable with a rating of 79, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

KDE’s Frameworks and Plasma were updated in the 20190726 snapshot. Frameworks 5.60.0 had multiple fixes for KTextEditor, KWayland, KIO and Baloo. The new version requires Qt 5.11 now that Qt 5.13 was released. Plasma 5.16.3 adds new translations and fixes including the fix of compilation without libinput and an improved appearance and reduce memory consumption with Plasma Audio Volume Control. There was a major version update for the checkmedia to version 5.2, which fixed a compat issue with older GCC. The new major version also allows to set a specific GPG key for signature verification. GNOME’s bijiben updated to version 3.32.2 and the update of curl 7.65.3 fixed several bugs and makes the progress meter appear again. A Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures that could allow remote attackers to execute other programs with root privileges was fixed in the message transfer agent exim 4.92.1. The 11.0.4.0 version of java-11-openjdk also fixed several CVEs and cleaned up the sources and code. Phonon, which is the multimedia Application Programming Interface (API) for KDE, removed the QFOREACH function in the headers when building for Qt 5 in version 4.10.3. The snapshot is trending as moderately stable with a rating of 76, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190724 had just three packages updated. GCC 9 received a small update that Included a fix for openCV3 builds with LTO and provided a fix for vector shift mis-compilation on IBM’s s390 architecture. The update of osc 0.165.3 fixed broken TLS certificate handling and the package ristretto, which is a fast and lightweight image viewer for the Xfce desktop, added support for Canon CR2 format and improved the “Sorting” menu with the 0.8.5 version update. The snapshot posted a moderately stable rating of 72, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

GNOME Packages, More Updated in Tumbleweed This Week

Thursday 25th of July 2019 09:47:35 AM

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been released since our last Tumbleweed update on Saturday.

The most recent snapshot, 20190723, updated Mozilla Firefox to version 68.0.1. The browser fixed the missing Full-Screen button when watching videos in full screen mode on HBO GO. The new 68 version enhanced the Dark Mode reader view to include darkening the controls, sidebars and toolbars. It also addressed several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE). The snapshot provided an update to GNOME 3.32.4, which fixed an issue that led to some packages with multiple appdata files not correctly showing up on the updates page. The Guile programming language package update to 2.2.6 fixed regression introduced in the previous version that broke HTTP servers locale encoding. Hardware library hwinfo 21.67 fixed Direct Access Storage Devices (DASD) detection. A major 7.0 version of hylafax+ arrived in the snapshot. The Linux Kernel brought several new features with the 5.2.1 kernel and enhanced security for a hardware vulnerability affecting Intel processors. The open-source painting program Krita 4.2.3 version offered a variety of fixes including a copy and paste fix of the animation frames. A few libraries like libgphoto2, libuv and libva received update. There were also several Perl and Rubygem packages that were updated in the snapshot. The file manager for the Xfce Desktop Environment, thunar 1.8.8, fixed XML declaration in uca.xml and the 2.15 transactional-update package enable network during updates and allow updates of the bootloader on EFI systems. The snapshot is currently trending at a 93 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Among the top packages to update in snapshot 20190721 were gnome-builder 3.32.4, wireshark 3.0.3 and an update for GNU Compiler Collection 9. GNOME Builder fixed the initial selection in project-tree popovers, Wireshark fixed CVE-2019-13619 and GCC9 added a patch to provide more stable builds for single value counters. The dracut package updated from 044.2 to 049; this update removed several patches and added support for compressed kernel modules. The Distributed Replicated Block Device (drbd) 9.0.19 package fixed resync stuck at near completion and introduced allow-remote-read configuration option. GNOME’s personal information management application evolution updated to version 3.32.4, which added an [ECompEditor] to ensure attendee changes are stored before saving. GNOME’s Grilo, which is a framework focused on making media discovery and browsing easy for application developers, updated to 0.3.9 fixed core keys extraction. GNOME’s Virtual file system (gvfs) and programming language Vala were updated to versions 1.40.2 and 0.44.6 respectively. Krita was also updated in this snapshot. The 0.5.1 version of python-parso fixed some unicode identifiers that were not correctly tokenized.  The snapshot is currently trending at a 90 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

KDE Applications, Squid, SQLite, VIM Update in Tumbleweed

Saturday 20th of July 2019 11:13:54 AM

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots in the middle of this week brought new minor version updates to ImageMagick, Squid, SQLite, VIM and more. The new KDE Applications 19.04.3 version arrived in the first two snapshots.

The more recent snapshot, 20190718, brought a half-dozen new packages, which include fix for the UrbanCode Deploy (UCD) script data for Unicode 10+ scripts for the OpenType text shaping engine package harfbuzz 2.5.3. A two-year old Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) was fixed with the update of libpng12 1.2.59. The tool that cleans RPM spec files, spec-cleaner 1.1.4, added a temporary patch to fix a test that fails if there is no internet connection. Caching proxy squid 4.8 fixed GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 9 build issues and added a fix to prevent parameter parsing used for a potential Denial of Service (DoS). RISC-V support was added with the virt-manager 2.2.1 update and xclock 1.0.9 was also updated in the snapshot, which is trending at a 97 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Updates for KDE Applications 19.04.3 were completed in snapshot 20190717. More than 60 bugfixes were made and improvements were made to Konqueror and Kontact so there is no longer a crash on exit with QtWebEngine 5.13. Cutting groups with compositions no longer crash the Kdenlive video editor and the Python importer in Umbrello’s Unified Modeling Language (UML) designer now handles parameters with default arguments. ImageMagick fixed a parsing issue and optimized the PDF reader with the 7.0.8.53 update. GNOME’s hex editor ghex 3.18.4 migrated the build system to meson and added Open Age Ratings Service (OARS) metadata. The kernel-firmware was updated in the snapshot. The newer php7 7.3.7 provided more than a dozen bug fixes to include a fix for reproducible builds that failed with OpenSSL 1.1.1c. The update of text editor vim from version 8.1.1600 to 8.1.1694 provided a large amount of fixes to include a fix for tests that get stuck when running into an existing swap file. The snapshot is also trending at a 97 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190716 started updating KDE Applications 19.04.3 and brought users of the rolling release 10 CVE fixes for Mozilla Thunderbird 60.8.0; the updated version also fixed problems when editing event times that related to AM/PM setting in non-English locations. The update to Ceph in the snapshot removed SuSEfirewall2 support. The update of gpg2 2.2.17 provided a new command –locate-external-key to locate the keys given as arguments. LibreOffice 6.2.5.2 removed some merged patches. Relational database management system sqlite3 3.29.0 added the “sqlite_dbdata” virtual table for extracting raw low-level content from an SQLite database to also include a database that is corrupt. The new major version of xreader 2.2.1 fixed incompatible pointer type issues and Linux syscall tracer strace 5.2 enhanced decoding of bpf, clone, inotify_init, mbind, and set_mempolicy syscalls. Other packages that received updates were python-qt5 5.13.0, python-sip 4.19.18 and rubygem-coffee-rails 5.0.0, which removed support for Rails below version 5.2 and added support for Rails 6. The snapshot is trending to project a 95 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer

Request Travel Support for the openSUSE.Asia Summit

Friday 19th of July 2019 08:26:49 AM

The Travel Support Program (TSP) provides travel sponsorships to openSUSE community who want to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit and need financial assistance. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be in Bali, Indonesia, at Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University on October 5 and 6.

The goal of the TSP is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit!

When and how

Requests for the TSP for this year’s openSUSE.Asia Summit have until August 24 to submit their request.

Remember: All requests will be managed through the TSP application at http://connect.opensuse.org/travel-support.

You will need an openSUSE Connect account in order to login to the application and apply for sponsorship. Please be sure to fulfill all of your personal details at openSUSE connect account to avoid delays or negative request. A good application with good information will be processed faster.

A few reminders

  • Please read the TSP page carefully before you apply.
  • Any information you send to the Travel Committee will be private.
  • We want everybody there! Even if you think you would not qualify for the travel support, just submit and make it worth! If you don’t try you won’t get!
  • If you submitted an abstract to be presented you should mention it in your application.
  • The Travel Committee can reimburse up to 80% of travel and/or lodging costs. That includes hotel, hostel, plane,train, bus, even gas for those willing to drive. Remember, no taxi!
    • Important: Food and all local expenses are on you!
  • We want to sponsor as many people as possible so please check the best deal.
  • The Travel Committee won’t be able to book or pay anything in advance. The reimbursement will be done after the event finishes and based on your expenses receipts.
  • no receipts = no money It is the rule! (Original receipts are required from German residences.)

If you have any question regarding your trip to the conference do not hesitate to ask the TSP or openSUSE.Asia Summit organizers.

We hope to see you there!

People of openSUSE: Sébastien Poher

Saturday 13th of July 2019 09:14:22 PM

Sébastien Poher aka sogal

About me

I’m 1.80m, I love to wear unreadable thrash metal bands t-shirts and prefer beer over wine (or any sort of drinks really).

My Beginnings

The first computer I ever touched was an Apple II. I remember spending hours playing this one game on a 5 1/2″ floppy disk where I had to drive, via a clunky joystick, a spaceship through the abysses of an asteroid, killing monsters around.

I got into Linux in two steps, first, in 2007 but I was the only one among my friends to use it so I ended up sticking to the shitty OS I had. My next re-discovery of Linux was later in 2012 when I started professional training in system administration.

Why openSUSE

I tried many Linux and BSD distributions but always got frustrated after a while. Leap offered me the exact perfect balance I was looking for between stability, reliability and relative freshness of packages.

My first contribution

I wanted to have an up-to-date package of Tilix (a tiling terminal emulator) so I worked on it; this made me discover the Open Build Service (OBS), which is such a wonderful tool, but above all, I found it easy to contribute. I think that one strength of the openSUSE Project is that the step someone would need to make to start contributing is a really small one.

About the community

I am a bit of a misanthropist so seeing that people from different origins, that do not necessarily know each other, are able to work together in a constructive, peaceful and funny way provides me a good dose of hope!

What I do in the realm of openSUSE

I maintain a small set of packages. It’s fun to do and it makes me learn a lot about the process of creation and all the clockwork behind a distribution. However, the highlight of my openSUSE activities is my involvement in the French openSUSE community through an association called Alionet. We do our best to relay openSUSE’s news and documentation in French (yeah, French people are terrible at English).

Challenges that faces openSUSE

The lack of volunteers among the users community -at least around me- tends to be a real problem. It is hard to get people involved “on the field” and keep them motivated.

openSUSE needs…

A periodic communication targeted for end users. I am glad to see this “People of openSUSE” project being revived, I would be happy to see the same thing happening with short articles about different software available in openSUSE or tips and tricks related to Leap, Tumbleweed or other openSUSE projects. Maybe by the end of the year or next year I will have more time to make this happens.

Me beyond openSUSE

I learn to play drums. It is kinda hard yet funny to see that, at first, my body does not obey my brain but after a while they manage to work together and create a nice rhythm.

My Computer setup

I have a Thinkpad T450 running Leap 15.1 with GNOME. The apps I use the most are Evolution, Firefox, Tilix and Cherrytree.

Tumbleweed’s July Snapshots Are Trending Strong

Thursday 11th of July 2019 09:46:03 AM

There have been a total of five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots since the beginning of July and all the snapshots have a strong, stable rating.

The rolling release had the most updates arrive in the 20190702 snapshot. The packages update in that snapshot included Mesa 19.1.1 and Mesa-drivers 19.1.1 that had fixes for Intel ANV and AMD RADV driver as well as Nouveau and R300 Gallium3D drivers. The bzip2 file compression application fixed undefined behavior in the macros in version 1.0.7 and fixed a low impact Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE). The programing language package guilef was updated to version 2.2.5 and provided bootstrap optimization. Portability improvements were made in the library for encryption, decryption, signatures and password hashing with libsodium 1.0.18. A major release of the PulseAudio’s Volume Control package pavucontrol 4.0 was made; the new version dropped support for Gtk+ 2 and added more than a handful of new language translations.

The most recent snapshot, 20190708, didn’t offer a changelog due to the server that the web app uses to produce the changelogs being upgraded to Leap 15.1. The changelog is expected to be included in the next snapshot that is released.

Just two packages were updated in the 20190704 snapshot. The newer vhba-kmp file system package from April 2019 fixed a crash when mounting disk image with the 5.1 Linux Kernel. The vm-install 0.10.07 package, which is a tool to define a Virtual Machine and Install Its Operating System, addressed the use of the ‘builder’ option in the config file that produces an error because it is deprecated.

The first snapshot of the month, 20190701, didn’t provide any new package releases, but there were some changes made to a few packages like the one to llvm8 (Low Level Virtual Machine) that increase RAM for armv6/7 to avoid the undesirable state of Out of memory (OOM). A patch was also dropped from the same package.

A few package updates were made available in the 20190703 snapshot. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.1.15. The updated kernel offered some fixes for mediatek MultiMediaCard (MMC) flow and detection issues and it enabled System Management Bus (SMBus) on Lenovo ThinkPad E480 and E580. KDE’s Hex editor for viewing and editing binary files okteta 0.26.2 improved the maximum array size in structures extended to 64K.

All snapshots released this month so far have recorded a stable rating of 93 or higher, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition Winner

Tuesday 9th of July 2019 08:07:48 AM

The votes are in and the openSUSE Project is happy to announce that the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 logo competition winner is Hervy Qurrotul from Indonesia. Congratulations Hervy! As the winner, Hervy will receive a “mystery box” from the committee.

On this logo competition, we have 18 submissions from all over the world. All the designs are great. This logo competition is voted by openSUSE.Asia Committee and Local Team. Thank you for your vote.

We would like to say thank you to all logo competition participants, Andi Laksana, Anggara Permana Putra, Bayu Aji, Budi Setiawan, Durim Berisha, Hammouda Elbez, Haruo Yoshino, Hege Dalsgaard, Hermansyah, Ilham Yusuf Fanani, Ka Chung Chan, M Afifudin, Muhammad Luthfi As Syafii, Rania Amina, Wisnu Adi Santoso, and Yuha Bani Mahardika.  We look forward to see you at the Summit.

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