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Kata Containers Packages are Available officially in openSUSE Tumbleweed

Saturday 17th of August 2019 04:22:30 PM

Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

What is Kata

As already mentioned, Kata is a container runtime focusing on security and on ease of integration with the existing containers ecosystem. If you are wondering what’s a container runtime, this blog post by Sascha will give you a clear introduction about the topic.

Kata should be used when running container images whose source is not fully trusted, or when allowing other users to run their own containers on your platform.

Traditionally, containers share the same physical and operating system (OS) resources with host processes, and specific kernel features such as namespaces are used to provide an isolation layer between host and container processes. By contrast, Kata containers run inside lightweight virtual machines, adding an extra isolation and security layer, that minimizes the host attack surface and mitigates the consequences of containers breakout. Despite this extra layer, Kata achieves impressive runtime performances thanks to KVM hardware virtualization, and when configured to use a minimalist virtual machine manager (VMM) like Firecracker, a high density of microVM can be packed on a single host.

If you want to know more about Kata features and performances:

  • katacontainers.io is a great starting point.
  • For something more SUSE oriented, Flavio gave a interesting talk about Kata at SUSECON 2019,
  • Kata folks hang out on katacontainers.slack.com, and will be happy to answer any quesitons.
Why is it important for Kubic and openSUSE

SUSE has been an early and relevant open source contributor to containers projects, believing that this technology is the future way of deploying and running software.

The most relevant example is the openSUSE Kubic project, that’s a certified Kubernetes distribution and a set of container-related technologies built by the openSUSE community.

We have also been working for some time in well known container projects, like runC, libpod and CRI-O, and since a year we also collaborate with Kata.

Kata complements other more popular ways to run containers, so it makes sense for us to work on improving it and to assure it can smoothly plug with our products.

How to use

While Kata may be used as a standalone piece of software, its intended use is to serve as a runtime when integrated in a container engine like Podman or CRI-O.

This section shows a quick and easy way to spin up a Kata container using Podman on openSUSE Tumbleweed.

First, install the Kata packages:

$ sudo zypper in katacontainers

Make sure your system is providing the needed set of hardware virtualization features required by Kata:

$ sudo kata-runtime kata-check

If no errors are reported, great! Your system is now ready to run Kata Containers.

If you haven’t already, install podman with:

$ sudo zypper in podman

That’ all. Try running a your first Kata container with:

$ sudo podman run -it --rm --runtime=/usr/bin/kata-runtime opensuse/leap uname -a Linux ab511687b1ed 5.2.5-1-kvmsmall #1 SMP Wed Jul 31 10:41:36 UTC 2019 (79b6a9c) x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux Differences with runC

Now that you have Kata up and running, let’s see some of the differences between Kata and runC, the most popular container runtime.

When starting a container with runC, container processes can be seen in the host processes tree:

... 10212 ? Ssl 0:00 /usr/lib/podman/bin/conmon -s -c <ctr-id> -u <ctr-id> 10236 ? Ss 0:00 \_ nginx: master process nginx -g daemon off; 10255 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process 10256 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process 10257 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process 10258 ? S 0:00 \_ nginx: worker process ...

With Kata, container processes are instead running in a dedicated VM, so they are not sharing OS resources with the host:

... 10651 ? Ssl 0:00 /home/marco/go/src/github.com/containers/conmon/bin/conmon -s -c <ctr-id> -u <ctr-id> 10703 ? Sl 0:01 \_ /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 -name sandbox-<ctr-id> -uuid e54ee910-2927-456e-a180-836b92ce5e7a -machine pc,accel=kvm,kernel_ir 10709 ? Ssl 0:00 \_ /usr/lib/kata-containers/kata-proxy -listen-socket unix:///run/vc/sbs/<ctr-id>/proxy.sock -mux-socket /run/vc/vm/829d8fe0680b 10729 ? Sl 0:00 \_ /usr/lib/kata-containers/kata-shim -agent unix:///run/vc/sbs/<ctr-id>/proxy.sock -container <ctr-id> ... Future plans

We are continuing to work to offer you a great user experience when using Kata on openSUSE by:

  • improving packages quality and stability,
  • delivering periodic releases,
  • making sure that Kata well integrates with the other container projects, like Podman and CRI-O.

As a longer term goal, we will integrate Kata in the Kubic distribution and in CaaSP, to make them some of the most complete and secure solutions to manage containers.

 

Originally published at https://github.com/kubic-project/kubic-o-o/blob/master/blog/_posts/2019-08-14-kata-in-tumbleweed.md

New 4.0.2 Version of Uyuni is Released

Friday 2nd of August 2019 05:40:43 PM

Contributors of Uyuni Project have released a new version of Uyuni 4.0.2, which is an open-source infrastructure management solution tailored for software-defined infrastructure.

Uyuni, a fork of the Spacewalk project, modernizing Spacewalk with SaltStack, provides more operating systems support and better scalability capabilities. Uyuni is now the upstream for SUSE Manager.

With this release, Uyuni provides powerful new features such as monitoring, content lifecycle management and virtual machine management.

Both the Uyuni Server node and the optional proxy nodes work on top of openSUSE Leap 15.1 and support Leap 15.1, CentOS, Ubuntu and others as clients. Debian support is experimental. The new version of Uyuni uses Salt 2019.2, Grafana 6.2.5, Cobbler 3.0 and Python 3.6 in the backend.

“The upgrade involves the complete replacement of the underlying operating system,” according to a post on July 9 by Hubert Mantel on Github. “This is a very critical operation and it is impossible to handle any potential failure in a graceful way. For example, an error during upgrade of the base OS might lead to a completely broken system which cannot be recovered.

Given that the upgrade of Uyuni also involves upgrading the base operating system from Leap 42.3 to Leap 15.1, it is highly advisable to create a backup of the server before running the migration. If the Uyuni server is running in a virtual machine, it is recommended to take a snapshot of the machine before running the migration.

Migration is performed by first updating the susemanager package:

zypper ref && zypper in susemanager

Then run the migration script:

/usr/lib/susemanager/bin/server-migrator.sh

“This script will stop the services, subscribe the new software repositories and finally perform the actual update to the new version,” Mantel wrote on Github. “After successful migration, services will not be started automatically. The system needs to be rebooted and this will also re-start all the services. There is nothing additional the admin needs to do.”

The intention of the fork was to provide new inspiration to a Spacewalk, which had been perceived as idling in recent years. Uyuni is using Salt for configuration management, thereby inheriting its name: Uyuni refers to the world’s largest Salt flat, Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia.

Interested members can follow the project on https://github.com/uyuni-project, www.uyuni-project.org, via Twitter at @UyuniProject, or join #uyuni at irc.freenode.org.

Mesa, ImageMagick, Plasma, Frameworks Update in Tumbleweed

Thursday 1st of August 2019 09:39:20 AM

There have been three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released since last week.

The snapshots brought a single major version update and new versions of KDE’s Plasma and Frameworks.

ImageMagick’s 7.0.8.56 version arrived in snapshot 20190730 and added support for the TIM2 image format, which is commonly used in PlayStation 2 and sometimes in PlayStation Portable games. The snapshot also delivered an update for Mesa 3D Graphics Library with version 19.1.3 that mostly provided fixes for ANV and RADV drivers, as well as NIR backend fixes. File searching tool catfish 1.4.8 provided some fixes with directories and a fix running on Wayland. The GNU Compiler Collection 7 added a patch and fixed for a Link Time Optimization (LTO) linker plugin. The 9.0.1 glu, which is the OpenGL Utility library for Mesa, fixed a possible memory leak. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.2.3; the new version made a few fixes for PowerPC and added Bluetooth for some new devices. Serval Python packages were updated in the snapshot. LLVM tools and libraries were updated in Tumbleweed with llvm8 8.0.1 but the changelog states not to run LLVM tests on PowerPC because of sporadic hangs. The 2.4.7 version of openvpn in the snapshot added support for tls-ciphersuites for TLS 1.3 and updated openvpn.keyring with public key downloaded from https://swupdate.openvpn.net/community/keys/security-key-2019.asc. A lengthy list of fixes were made to the VIM text editor in version 8.1.1741. Other packages updated in the snapshot were ucode-intel 20190618, xapps 1.4.8, ypbind 2.6.1 and zstd 1.4.1. The snapshot is trending as moderately stable with a rating of 79, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

KDE’s Frameworks and Plasma were updated in the 20190726 snapshot. Frameworks 5.60.0 had multiple fixes for KTextEditor, KWayland, KIO and Baloo. The new version requires Qt 5.11 now that Qt 5.13 was released. Plasma 5.16.3 adds new translations and fixes including the fix of compilation without libinput and an improved appearance and reduce memory consumption with Plasma Audio Volume Control. There was a major version update for the checkmedia to version 5.2, which fixed a compat issue with older GCC. The new major version also allows to set a specific GPG key for signature verification. GNOME’s bijiben updated to version 3.32.2 and the update of curl 7.65.3 fixed several bugs and makes the progress meter appear again. A Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures that could allow remote attackers to execute other programs with root privileges was fixed in the message transfer agent exim 4.92.1. The 11.0.4.0 version of java-11-openjdk also fixed several CVEs and cleaned up the sources and code. Phonon, which is the multimedia Application Programming Interface (API) for KDE, removed the QFOREACH function in the headers when building for Qt 5 in version 4.10.3. The snapshot is trending as moderately stable with a rating of 76, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190724 had just three packages updated. GCC 9 received a small update that Included a fix for openCV3 builds with LTO and provided a fix for vector shift mis-compilation on IBM’s s390 architecture. The update of osc 0.165.3 fixed broken TLS certificate handling and the package ristretto, which is a fast and lightweight image viewer for the Xfce desktop, added support for Canon CR2 format and improved the “Sorting” menu with the 0.8.5 version update. The snapshot posted a moderately stable rating of 72, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

GNOME Packages, More Updated in Tumbleweed This Week

Thursday 25th of July 2019 09:47:35 AM

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been released since our last Tumbleweed update on Saturday.

The most recent snapshot, 20190723, updated Mozilla Firefox to version 68.0.1. The browser fixed the missing Full-Screen button when watching videos in full screen mode on HBO GO. The new 68 version enhanced the Dark Mode reader view to include darkening the controls, sidebars and toolbars. It also addressed several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE). The snapshot provided an update to GNOME 3.32.4, which fixed an issue that led to some packages with multiple appdata files not correctly showing up on the updates page. The Guile programming language package update to 2.2.6 fixed regression introduced in the previous version that broke HTTP servers locale encoding. Hardware library hwinfo 21.67 fixed Direct Access Storage Devices (DASD) detection. A major 7.0 version of hylafax+ arrived in the snapshot. The Linux Kernel brought several new features with the 5.2.1 kernel and enhanced security for a hardware vulnerability affecting Intel processors. The open-source painting program Krita 4.2.3 version offered a variety of fixes including a copy and paste fix of the animation frames. A few libraries like libgphoto2, libuv and libva received update. There were also several Perl and Rubygem packages that were updated in the snapshot. The file manager for the Xfce Desktop Environment, thunar 1.8.8, fixed XML declaration in uca.xml and the 2.15 transactional-update package enable network during updates and allow updates of the bootloader on EFI systems. The snapshot is currently trending at a 93 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Among the top packages to update in snapshot 20190721 were gnome-builder 3.32.4, wireshark 3.0.3 and an update for GNU Compiler Collection 9. GNOME Builder fixed the initial selection in project-tree popovers, Wireshark fixed CVE-2019-13619 and GCC9 added a patch to provide more stable builds for single value counters. The dracut package updated from 044.2 to 049; this update removed several patches and added support for compressed kernel modules. The Distributed Replicated Block Device (drbd) 9.0.19 package fixed resync stuck at near completion and introduced allow-remote-read configuration option. GNOME’s personal information management application evolution updated to version 3.32.4, which added an [ECompEditor] to ensure attendee changes are stored before saving. GNOME’s Grilo, which is a framework focused on making media discovery and browsing easy for application developers, updated to 0.3.9 fixed core keys extraction. GNOME’s Virtual file system (gvfs) and programming language Vala were updated to versions 1.40.2 and 0.44.6 respectively. Krita was also updated in this snapshot. The 0.5.1 version of python-parso fixed some unicode identifiers that were not correctly tokenized.  The snapshot is currently trending at a 90 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

KDE Applications, Squid, SQLite, VIM Update in Tumbleweed

Saturday 20th of July 2019 11:13:54 AM

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots in the middle of this week brought new minor version updates to ImageMagick, Squid, SQLite, VIM and more. The new KDE Applications 19.04.3 version arrived in the first two snapshots.

The more recent snapshot, 20190718, brought a half-dozen new packages, which include fix for the UrbanCode Deploy (UCD) script data for Unicode 10+ scripts for the OpenType text shaping engine package harfbuzz 2.5.3. A two-year old Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) was fixed with the update of libpng12 1.2.59. The tool that cleans RPM spec files, spec-cleaner 1.1.4, added a temporary patch to fix a test that fails if there is no internet connection. Caching proxy squid 4.8 fixed GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 9 build issues and added a fix to prevent parameter parsing used for a potential Denial of Service (DoS). RISC-V support was added with the virt-manager 2.2.1 update and xclock 1.0.9 was also updated in the snapshot, which is trending at a 97 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Updates for KDE Applications 19.04.3 were completed in snapshot 20190717. More than 60 bugfixes were made and improvements were made to Konqueror and Kontact so there is no longer a crash on exit with QtWebEngine 5.13. Cutting groups with compositions no longer crash the Kdenlive video editor and the Python importer in Umbrello’s Unified Modeling Language (UML) designer now handles parameters with default arguments. ImageMagick fixed a parsing issue and optimized the PDF reader with the 7.0.8.53 update. GNOME’s hex editor ghex 3.18.4 migrated the build system to meson and added Open Age Ratings Service (OARS) metadata. The kernel-firmware was updated in the snapshot. The newer php7 7.3.7 provided more than a dozen bug fixes to include a fix for reproducible builds that failed with OpenSSL 1.1.1c. The update of text editor vim from version 8.1.1600 to 8.1.1694 provided a large amount of fixes to include a fix for tests that get stuck when running into an existing swap file. The snapshot is also trending at a 97 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190716 started updating KDE Applications 19.04.3 and brought users of the rolling release 10 CVE fixes for Mozilla Thunderbird 60.8.0; the updated version also fixed problems when editing event times that related to AM/PM setting in non-English locations. The update to Ceph in the snapshot removed SuSEfirewall2 support. The update of gpg2 2.2.17 provided a new command –locate-external-key to locate the keys given as arguments. LibreOffice 6.2.5.2 removed some merged patches. Relational database management system sqlite3 3.29.0 added the “sqlite_dbdata” virtual table for extracting raw low-level content from an SQLite database to also include a database that is corrupt. The new major version of xreader 2.2.1 fixed incompatible pointer type issues and Linux syscall tracer strace 5.2 enhanced decoding of bpf, clone, inotify_init, mbind, and set_mempolicy syscalls. Other packages that received updates were python-qt5 5.13.0, python-sip 4.19.18 and rubygem-coffee-rails 5.0.0, which removed support for Rails below version 5.2 and added support for Rails 6. The snapshot is trending to project a 95 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer

Request Travel Support for the openSUSE.Asia Summit

Friday 19th of July 2019 08:26:49 AM

The Travel Support Program (TSP) provides travel sponsorships to openSUSE community who want to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit and need financial assistance. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be in Bali, Indonesia, at Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University on October 5 and 6.

The goal of the TSP is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit!

When and how

Requests for the TSP for this year’s openSUSE.Asia Summit have until August 24 to submit their request.

Remember: All requests will be managed through the TSP application at http://connect.opensuse.org/travel-support.

You will need an openSUSE Connect account in order to login to the application and apply for sponsorship. Please be sure to fulfill all of your personal details at openSUSE connect account to avoid delays or negative request. A good application with good information will be processed faster.

A few reminders

  • Please read the TSP page carefully before you apply.
  • Any information you send to the Travel Committee will be private.
  • We want everybody there! Even if you think you would not qualify for the travel support, just submit and make it worth! If you don’t try you won’t get!
  • If you submitted an abstract to be presented you should mention it in your application.
  • The Travel Committee can reimburse up to 80% of travel and/or lodging costs. That includes hotel, hostel, plane,train, bus, even gas for those willing to drive. Remember, no taxi!
    • Important: Food and all local expenses are on you!
  • We want to sponsor as many people as possible so please check the best deal.
  • The Travel Committee won’t be able to book or pay anything in advance. The reimbursement will be done after the event finishes and based on your expenses receipts.
  • no receipts = no money It is the rule! (Original receipts are required from German residences.)

If you have any question regarding your trip to the conference do not hesitate to ask the TSP or openSUSE.Asia Summit organizers.

We hope to see you there!

People of openSUSE: Sébastien Poher

Saturday 13th of July 2019 09:14:22 PM

Sébastien Poher aka sogal

About me

I’m 1.80m, I love to wear unreadable thrash metal bands t-shirts and prefer beer over wine (or any sort of drinks really).

My Beginnings

The first computer I ever touched was an Apple II. I remember spending hours playing this one game on a 5 1/2″ floppy disk where I had to drive, via a clunky joystick, a spaceship through the abysses of an asteroid, killing monsters around.

I got into Linux in two steps, first, in 2007 but I was the only one among my friends to use it so I ended up sticking to the shitty OS I had. My next re-discovery of Linux was later in 2012 when I started professional training in system administration.

Why openSUSE

I tried many Linux and BSD distributions but always got frustrated after a while. Leap offered me the exact perfect balance I was looking for between stability, reliability and relative freshness of packages.

My first contribution

I wanted to have an up-to-date package of Tilix (a tiling terminal emulator) so I worked on it; this made me discover the Open Build Service (OBS), which is such a wonderful tool, but above all, I found it easy to contribute. I think that one strength of the openSUSE Project is that the step someone would need to make to start contributing is a really small one.

About the community

I am a bit of a misanthropist so seeing that people from different origins, that do not necessarily know each other, are able to work together in a constructive, peaceful and funny way provides me a good dose of hope!

What I do in the realm of openSUSE

I maintain a small set of packages. It’s fun to do and it makes me learn a lot about the process of creation and all the clockwork behind a distribution. However, the highlight of my openSUSE activities is my involvement in the French openSUSE community through an association called Alionet. We do our best to relay openSUSE’s news and documentation in French (yeah, French people are terrible at English).

Challenges that faces openSUSE

The lack of volunteers among the users community -at least around me- tends to be a real problem. It is hard to get people involved “on the field” and keep them motivated.

openSUSE needs…

A periodic communication targeted for end users. I am glad to see this “People of openSUSE” project being revived, I would be happy to see the same thing happening with short articles about different software available in openSUSE or tips and tricks related to Leap, Tumbleweed or other openSUSE projects. Maybe by the end of the year or next year I will have more time to make this happens.

Me beyond openSUSE

I learn to play drums. It is kinda hard yet funny to see that, at first, my body does not obey my brain but after a while they manage to work together and create a nice rhythm.

My Computer setup

I have a Thinkpad T450 running Leap 15.1 with GNOME. The apps I use the most are Evolution, Firefox, Tilix and Cherrytree.

Tumbleweed’s July Snapshots Are Trending Strong

Thursday 11th of July 2019 09:46:03 AM

There have been a total of five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots since the beginning of July and all the snapshots have a strong, stable rating.

The rolling release had the most updates arrive in the 20190702 snapshot. The packages update in that snapshot included Mesa 19.1.1 and Mesa-drivers 19.1.1 that had fixes for Intel ANV and AMD RADV driver as well as Nouveau and R300 Gallium3D drivers. The bzip2 file compression application fixed undefined behavior in the macros in version 1.0.7 and fixed a low impact Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE). The programing language package guilef was updated to version 2.2.5 and provided bootstrap optimization. Portability improvements were made in the library for encryption, decryption, signatures and password hashing with libsodium 1.0.18. A major release of the PulseAudio’s Volume Control package pavucontrol 4.0 was made; the new version dropped support for Gtk+ 2 and added more than a handful of new language translations.

The most recent snapshot, 20190708, didn’t offer a changelog due to the server that the web app uses to produce the changelogs being upgraded to Leap 15.1. The changelog is expected to be included in the next snapshot that is released.

Just two packages were updated in the 20190704 snapshot. The newer vhba-kmp file system package from April 2019 fixed a crash when mounting disk image with the 5.1 Linux Kernel. The vm-install 0.10.07 package, which is a tool to define a Virtual Machine and Install Its Operating System, addressed the use of the ‘builder’ option in the config file that produces an error because it is deprecated.

The first snapshot of the month, 20190701, didn’t provide any new package releases, but there were some changes made to a few packages like the one to llvm8 (Low Level Virtual Machine) that increase RAM for armv6/7 to avoid the undesirable state of Out of memory (OOM). A patch was also dropped from the same package.

A few package updates were made available in the 20190703 snapshot. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.1.15. The updated kernel offered some fixes for mediatek MultiMediaCard (MMC) flow and detection issues and it enabled System Management Bus (SMBus) on Lenovo ThinkPad E480 and E580. KDE’s Hex editor for viewing and editing binary files okteta 0.26.2 improved the maximum array size in structures extended to 64K.

All snapshots released this month so far have recorded a stable rating of 93 or higher, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition Winner

Tuesday 9th of July 2019 08:07:48 AM

The votes are in and the openSUSE Project is happy to announce that the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 logo competition winner is Hervy Qurrotul from Indonesia. Congratulations Hervy! As the winner, Hervy will receive a “mystery box” from the committee.

On this logo competition, we have 18 submissions from all over the world. All the designs are great. This logo competition is voted by openSUSE.Asia Committee and Local Team. Thank you for your vote.

We would like to say thank you to all logo competition participants, Andi Laksana, Anggara Permana Putra, Bayu Aji, Budi Setiawan, Durim Berisha, Hammouda Elbez, Haruo Yoshino, Hege Dalsgaard, Hermansyah, Ilham Yusuf Fanani, Ka Chung Chan, M Afifudin, Muhammad Luthfi As Syafii, Rania Amina, Wisnu Adi Santoso, and Yuha Bani Mahardika.  We look forward to see you at the Summit.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020: Call for Host

Friday 28th of June 2019 08:00:06 AM

The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia. The event focuses primarily on the openSUSE distribution, its applications for personal and enterprise use, and open source culture. It brings together the openSUSE community in Asia, providing a forum for users, developers, foundation leaders, governments and businesses to discuss the present technology and future developments.

The Summit’s preference is to find new locations each year as we spread openSUSE throughout Asia, and we are looking for local organizers to rise to the challenge of organizing an excellent openSUSE event in 2020. We need individuals and communities to get together and organize a successful openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia organization committee assists throughout the process.

Proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020

For those of you who are interested in hosting the next openSUSE.Asia Summit, you are invited to submit a formal proposal to the openSUSE.Asia organization committee and join this year summit. The deadlines for the proposals are as the following:

  • Aug. 1: Registration on the host candidates
  • Sep. 28: Deadline of Submission of the proposals
  • Oct. 5-6: Presentation at openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019
  • Dec. 1: Announcement of the next host

The registration only requires the informal introduction of the organizers and the city or the country where the summit will take place. Without the registration, you cannot submit your proposal. Please send the introduction and your proposal to both opensuse-summit@opensuse.org and opensuseasia-summit@googlegroups.com.

We will invite you to our regular online meetings so that you can understand how the summit is organized. Furthermore, we are going to ask you to show your proposals at the next summit in Bali, Indonesia.

The submitted proposals are to be reviewed by the organization committee, and one from them is to be selected by vote. The committee might have additional questions and requests during the review.

More information including former summits, the organization committee, and our annual roadmap until the next summit is available at the Asia Summit Portal: https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Asia_Summit

Things to be Written in Your Proposals

The conference will require the availability of facilities for around a weekend, during the latter half of 2020. Final event dates should avoid other major free software conferences or other events that may have a conflict (e.g., Open Source Summit Europe) and will be confirmed together with other openSUSE teams who might get involved.

Key points proposals should consider, and what will be taken into account when deciding among candidates, are:

  1. Introduction
    • Your country, city, etc.
    • Local openSUSE community (e.g., local events, online community)
  2. Objectives
  3. Local organizers
    • Proposed local organizing committee
      • Local openSUSE advocates, developers, users, etc.
      • People from the local FLOSS community or university
    • Proposed supporting organizations
  4. Expected dates
  5. Venue
    • Rooms
    • Local and international travel information
      • Flight, access from hotels
      • Visa
    • Food and accommodation

 

  1. Milestones until the summit
  2. Activities and schedule
    • Registration
    • Hack-fest (This is an option)
    • Conference
    • Keynote
    • Dinner and party
  3. Expected attendees and marketing
  4. Budget Estimation
    • Conference Venue
    • Marketing materials(T-shirts,banner,badge,posters, etc.)
    • Tea break, Lunch, Dinner
    • Travel subsidy and accommodation
    • Miscellaneous(Think about 10% uplift to have more buffer)
  5. Potential sponsors & media partners
  6. Conclusion

Feel free to contact opensuse-summit@opensuse.org if you have any questions. If this excites you enough, but you are still not sure, we should talk and see if we can solve your doubts. Please help to spread the words and we are looking forward to hearing from you soon!

New node.js LTS, GNU Debugger, libvirt Updates Arrive in Tumbleweed Snapshots

Thursday 13th of June 2019 08:35:45 AM

The three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week updated some key packages for users of the rolling release.

One of those key packages was an update of the GNU Debugger, gdb 8.3, which was released in the 20190607 snapshot. The debugger enabled ada tests on ppc64le and riscv64; multitarget builds for riscv64 were also enabled. The snapshot also added unit test for Logical Volume Manager (LVM) over Modular Disk (MD) with the update of libstorage-ng 4.1.127. Several patches and bug fixes were applied with the update of libvirt 5.4.0, which also made an improvement to avoided unnecessary static linking that results in both the disk and memory footprint being reduced. Libvirt also introduced support for the md-clear CPUID bit. The python-libvirt-python 5.4.0 package added all new Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and constants in libvirt 5.4.0. Text editor vim 8.1.1467 had multiple fixes, but the Tumbleweed snapshot introduced some new bugs and is currently trending at an 86 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

The two previous snapshots recorded an exceptional stable rating of 98 according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190606 updated just two packages. The nodejs10 package put out a new upstream Long-Term-Support (LTS) version with nodejs10 10.16.0, which upgraded upgrade openssl sources to 1.1.1b and libuv to 1.28.0. The other package update in the snapshot was xfdesktop 4.12.5; the package for the Xfce 4 Desktop Environment fixed icon sizes in settings, reset the desktop icon order and fixed a timer leak.

The 20190605 snapshot had three packages updated. Linux Kernel 5.1.7 had some fixes pertaining to Btrfs like fixing the in-core state with a storage device between ranged fsync and writeback of adjacent ranges. The kernel update also removed dependencies with the arch_timer driver internals for the arm architecture and added Ice Lake support for Intel’s x86 power mode or c-state. Time Zones were updated with the libical 3.0.5 package and the libinput 1.13.2 package made some changes for Wacom touchpads and Apple bluetooth touchpad.

Release manager Dominique Leuenberger wrote a review of the previous two weeks and stated that openssl 1.1.1c, Texlive 2019, KDE Plasma 5.16, Qt 5.13, LLVM 8, swig 4.0, and cmake 3.14 were all progressing in the staging projects and will be released soon in upcoming Tumbleweed snapshots.

People of openSUSE: Stasiek Michalski

Friday 7th of June 2019 10:47:02 AM
Introduction

I’m LCP, or Stasiek if you can pronounce that. Just a 20 years old guy from Poland who spends way too much time in front of computers. That’s how all my potted plants end up dead.

My Journey

I’ve been using computers for as long as I can remember, playing Solitaire, The Settlers, and other simple DOS games, because that’s what my parents and grandma liked to play. I started with Win95, 98, and 2000, before learning about Linux.

My interest in design was sparked by the original iPhone icons, which I loved. In contrast with my hatred toward the Faenza icon theme, both have fairly similar style yet widely different results. That’s how I began exploring and learned from there.

Correspondingly, my Linux journey started back in 2007 when my dad showed me Ubuntu, and just like what I did with Windows 2000 before, my pastime became installing and reinstalling Linux alongside Windows in different configurations (I apparently was consumed by the concept of installation and configuration, which might explain my YaST obsession?).

Later in 2010, I had a tough time with a machine that wouldn’t take any distro with the exception of openSUSE (although it did end up with a few Linuxrc errors). Besides, I really liked its GNOME 2 config back then; it was really user friendly yet powerful. I gave KDE a shot but to this day I never really liked it.

Contributing, how it all started…

My first contribution was because of my consistent and annoying complaining to Richard Brown on Linux Gaming Discord about the sorrow state of artwork in Tumbleweed. I didn’t like anything there. I, it seemed too dark, too boring; stuff was barely visible due to contrast issues. He pointed me to contribute and make it better then, so I did. Around the same time me and some of other people from Linux Gaming Discord created the openSUSE Discord, and I reused some assets from the Discord to create the new branding.

Even though my main focus has been artwork, I also take part in some coding, translations, and obviously testing. I enjoy all of it in general. It is a great way to make computing easier and more pleasant for other less experienced users.

Actually, to me, my most valuable contribution has been encouraging people to use openSUSE and contribute to it, while doing my best to help them out when needed. Otherwise, I wouldn’t have been able to provide anything on my own because I rely on community to actively help me out with their judgment; just as I do help them out with mine.

Side projects

Outside of openSUSE I also work on Pixelfed, some Discord distros collaboration (artwork for Fedora and Gentoo discords on top of openSUSE one) and more recently been working on User Interface (UI) design for SuperTuxKart and some custom tiles for OpenSkyscraper in order to replace injecting the EXE file (but gamedev is hard, you know).

One thing that needs more attention in openSUSE?

Libyui-gtk needs more attention. It’s a library that was originally developed for YaST then got dropped, but Manatools still heavily depends on it. Any contribution to the development is encouraged and will help bring it back home.

Gaming

I don’t play as often as I used to because I’m busy contributing, but I love Minecraft, The Settlers 2 and Solitaire Spider, which its terminal version was my very first open source software project.

Something I can talk about for hours

Recently, it’s been radio buttons. The design we use in UIs doesn’t make much sense compared to the real life equivalent, as opposed to basically every other form element. But at the same time we can’t do much about it… now that people got used to this one. Plus, I don’t see a proper replacement.

A lie about myself

I like dogs.

I’d like to add

Please contribute to https://github.com/openSUSE/branding/issues/93, every voice matters!

Mesa, VirtualBox, Ceph, NetworkManager Packages Update in Tumbleweed

Thursday 6th of June 2019 09:23:56 AM

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been released in the first four days of June, which bring several minor package updates to the rolling release.

The 20190604 snapshot brought babl  0.1.64, which provided some code consistency, gitlab Continuous Integration (CI), autotools and meson build improvements. An accident in naming caused the 0.3.2 version of bubblewrap to become version 0.3.3. However, bubblewrap 0.3.3. did address a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), provided a few smaller fixes and added the JSON Application Programming Interface (API) that allows reading the inner process exit code. GNU Compiler Collection 8 had some updates that included a couple patches with one that makes builds without profiling reproducible. Generic Graphics Library gegl 0.4.16 also added gitlab CI and uses a custom allocator for tile data, which aligns data and groups allocations in blocks; this was achieved on Linux by using the GNU extension malloc_trim to permit forcing invocation of the glibc malloc/free allocators garbage collection function. Oracle’ virtualbox 6.0.8 had a minor maintenance release that fixed a crash when powering off a Virtual Machine without a graphics controller and xorg-x11-server 1.20.5 fixed some input. The snapshot is currently trending at a 96 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190603 updated Mesa and Mesa-drivers to version 19.0.5 and took care of some core code and drivers. NetworkManager 1.16.2 fixed some wrong permissions of the /var/lib/NetworkManager/secret_key file. Ceph’s minor version update disabled Link Time Optimisation in spec when being used. GNOME 3.32.2 had several package updates and fixes including the fix of a regression that caused the fonts category to go missing. Tumbleweed skipped over the 1.3.0 series of Flatpak directly to version 1.4.0. The major changes since 1.2.4 is the improved I/O use for system-installed applications, and the new format for pre-configured remotes. Glib2 2.60.3 updated translations and provided various fixes to small key/value support in GHashTable. Scripting language php7 7.3.6 added a missing curl_version and fixed several other bugs. The snapshot is currently trending at a 95 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

The snapshot that started out the month, 20190601, update the Linux Kernel to 5.1.5 that fixed a data loss bug. Flatpak-builder 1.0.7 fixed some details in how to create platform commits to fix font cache mtime issues. Among the other package updates in the snapshot were GNOME’s image viewer gthumb 3.8.0, ibus-libpinyin 1.11.1, libopenmpt 0.4.5, qalculate 3.2.0, rdesktop 1.8.6, which fixed the protocol code handling new licenses, and yast2-support 4.1.1. The snapshot is currently trending at a 90 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

Wednesday 22nd of May 2019 12:32:02 PM
Leap 15.1 Supports More Hardware, Drivers, Enhances Installation

EN / CA / DE / FR / IT / ES / JA / NL / PL / ZH / ZH-TW

22/05/2019

NUREMBERG, Germany – Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

Professional users, system administrators and developers can have confidence in the reliability of the Leap distribution based on its development process to deliver a modern, secure, maintained and highly tested distribution using the open-source build system unique to both SUSE and openSUSE, which is the Open Build Service, along with the automated testing of openQA.

What’s New

An entirely new graphics stack update is available for this stable community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution. Graphics hardware supported by the 4.19 Linux Kernel were backported for the release of Leap 15.1, which uses the 4.12 Linux Kernel and supports additional graphics drivers for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and improved support for AMD Vega chipset.

GPU virtualization has become quite popular among vendors like AMD, Intel and Nvidia and Leap 15.1 helps to delivers these implementation and support solutions for virtualized and cloud environments.

Leap 15.1 will now use Network Manager by default for both laptops and desktops – previously only laptops defaulted to Network Manager. Server installations will continue to default to Wicked, the openSUSE advanced network configuration system. The release adds a few popular WiFi drivers for more modern wireless chipsets. A change that applies to both Wicked and Network Manager is that /etc/resolv.conf, yp.conf and some other files are a link to a file in /run and are managed by netconfig.

The management of system services in YaST has been revamped to take advantage of many of the features offered by systemd in that area.

Improved Setup and Configuration

Some of the improvements to YaST have made for better management of services. Firewalld can be managed in text mode. There is a new User Interface to manage Firewalld, including AutoYaST support/advancements. System administrators will have better control with Salt formulas in the yast2-configuration-management module, and management of SSH keys per user will make sysadmins tasks much more pleasant.

YaST comes with an improved Partitioner, that now can automatically format full disks without partition tables, create software MD RAIDs on top of full disks, create partitions within a software-defined MD RAID and many other combinations. AutoYaST also supports all these combinations. The work the YaST team has put into the setup and configuration tool has a better default partitioning proposal in several scenarios like those with small disks or systems with several disks making solutions easier for Linux professionals. Leap 15.1 brings new YaST icons developed by the community.

The YaST team worked hard on improving the 4k display (HiDPI) experience. HiDPI displays are now autodetected and the UI is auto-scaled giving the installer a beautifully crisp interface.

Security and Maintenance

Maintenance updates from both Leap 15 and updates from SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 are inherited into Leap 15.1 and are part of the release. The security team issues fast updates for Leap 15.1. With maintenance updates, about 10 to 20 percent are contributed from the community.

There is a YaST testing option for users to test maintenance updates before being released. The testing repository allows users to test the updates five days before being pushed to the maintenance update repository.

Minor versions of the Leap 15 series have about an 18-month life cycle of maintenance and security as minor releases come roughly once a year. Users of openSUSE Leap, 15.0, which was released on May 25, 2018, should upgrade to Leap 15.1 within the next 6 months. The 15 series of Leap is expected to achieve an estimated 36 months of maintenance and security updates.

Images, Deployment and Hardware with Linode, Slimbooks and Tuxedo

Leap 15.1 continues to add more hardware providers as Slimbook and TUXEDO Computers will both offer the option of purchasing hardware with Leap 15.1 preinstalled. Linode cloud images of Leap are available today and ready for all infrastructure needs.

TUXEDO Computers devices were an important part of the openSUSE reference tests of Leap 15.1.

“We share the fundamental belief that the user should have the best user experience we can offer,” said Herbert Feiler, CEO of TUXEDO Computers. “openSUSE Leap 15.1 is the consistent continuation and further development of stable Linux for end users. Therefore we of course continue to offer openSUSE pre-installed on all TUXEDO notebooks and PCs,” adds Feiler.

Cloud hosting services will offer images of Leap 15.1 in the coming weeks like Amazon Web Services, Azure and OpenStack. Leap 15 is continually optimized for cloud usage scenarios as a host and virtualization guest.

Desktop Environment

Leap offers a great variety of Linux desktops, including traditional KDE, GNOME as well as efficient Xfce. Users can select their preferred desktop environment, configuration and workflow. GNOME 3.26 and the Long-Term-Support version of KDE Plasma 5.12 are in both Leap 15.0 and Leap 15.1. SLE 15 enterprise users can also get the KDE version and other community tools and packages available through PackageHub. Live images of KDE and GNOME are available for simple test-driving through the live tab under the Leap distribution on software.opensuse.org; a Rescue Live image is also available on the Live Images page for those mentioned above.

Containers

Leap 15.1 is filled with several containerization technologies like Singularity, which bring containers and reproducibility to scientific computing and the high-performance computing (HPC) world. Singularity first appeared in the Leap distribution in Leap 42.3 and provides functionality to build smallest minimal containers and runs the containers as single application environments. This is also the first Leap release containing the Podman container runtime and Buildah build tool; the used by default in openSUSE Kubic. Collectively they provide a more lightweight and resilient alternative to the alternative Docker container runtime, while also adding a number of unique features.

Gamers and Designers

Web designers and digital marketers can make use of the newer graphics stack with the minor version update of the Mesa 3d Graphic Library and use open source tools like the 3D Creation Software Blender to create intriguing and captivating animations.

Gamers, music lovers and podcaster can enjoy the enhancements of the High Definition HD-audio, backported USB-audio drivers and software updates that were made for MultiMedia Card (MMC) and embedded MMC (eMMC).

Migration to Enterprise made easy

openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings plenty of community packages built on top of a core sources of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 SP1. The shared common core and alignment with SLE makes migrations to SUSE’s enterprise product easy for professional who want to extend the life cycle of their maintenance and security past the lifecycle of Leap. Migrating from the community version of Leap to SUSE Linux Enterprise is an available option for those who desire to migrate. The migration from openSUSE Leap server installations to SUSE Linux Enterprise is easy for system integrators developing on Leap code who may decide to move to an enterprise version for SLAs, certification, mass deployment, or extended Long Term Support. The instructions on how to do this using the SUSEConnect package and SUSE documentation can be found here.

All Standard and Some Existing Services for Networks

Like prior versions, System Administrators and small businesses can use Leap for hosting web and mail servers or for network management with DHCP, DNS, NTP, Samba, NFS, LDAP, and hundreds of other services.

File sharing and cloud services include software such as NextCloud and even the groupware application suite Kopano (formerly known as Zarafa) is part of the official Leap 15.1 repositories.

Leap 15.1 also introduces automatically configured SSH for both it’s “Server” and “Transactional Server” system roles by default, helping make things a little easier to work on your server immediately after installation.

Health and Science

The Leap distribution supports the health, science, research and developer communities. GNU Health, the award-winning health- and hospital management system, comes in version 3.4.x, which introduces the Federation Server, gnuhealth-thalamus. There is an added setup-script for GNU Health called openSUSE-gnuhealth-setup to ease the setup of a new system for less experienced users. Solve linear and nonlinear problems numerically and perform other numerical experiments using a language that is mostly compatible with MATLAB through GNU Octave or use the Free and Open Source Geographic Information System QGIS to create, edit, visualize, analyze and publish geospatial information. Leap has plenty more packages like the Computer Algebra System (CAS) for problems in field theory called Cadabra, the interactive physical simulator Step, and the periodic table package Kalzium.

Platforms

Leap works with X86_64 and deployment scenarios can be run for physical, virtual, host and guest, and cloud. Ports to other architectures like ARM64 and POWER are in the works by the community.

The installation of openSUSE for the Raspberry Pi for ARM64 has been simplified to one image and is customizable. openSUSE Leap 15.1 is the first multi-purpose operating systems to support a full standard Linux experience in Raspberry Pi. There is no need for a custom specific ISO or precooked image to install on the Raspberry PI. The standard unmodified openSUSE image can be installed just like on any other computer. The installer detects and proposes the set of default configurations. Raspberry Pi needs a very specific partition containing the system firmware. This is important for the installer to detect the specific partition, preserve it and mount it in /boot/vc to allow the operating system to perform updates of the firmware.

Download Leap 15.1

To download the ISO image, visit https://software.opensuse.org/distributions/leap

Questions

If you have a question about the release or think you may have found a bug, ask on one of the following :

Get involved

If you would like to help the openSUSE Project, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at: https://rootco.de/2016-04-03-opensuse-and-you/

The openSUSE Project is a worldwide community that promotes the use of Linux everywhere. It creates two of the world’s best Linux distributions, the Tumbleweed rolling-release, and Leap, the hybrid enterprise-community distribution. openSUSE is continuously working together in an open, transparent and friendly manner as part of the worldwide Free and Open Source Software community. The project is controlled by its community and relies on the contributions of individuals, working as testers, writers, translators, usability experts, artists and ambassadors or developers. The project embraces a wide variety of technology, people with different levels of expertise, speaking different languages and having different cultural backgrounds. Learn more about it on opensuse.org

Stable Sailing For Tumbleweed Snapshots This Week

Thursday 16th of May 2019 09:03:29 AM
Developers Can Make Use of GCC 9, QEMU 4, Wireshark 3

This week produced a smooth and rapid release of stable openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot as the rolling release produced a total of five stable or trending stable snapshots, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The production of snapshots provided both large and small package updates with GNU Compiler Collection 9, Wireshark 3.0.1, QEMU 4.0, KDE Applications 19.04.1, GNOME 3.32.2 and KDE Plasma 5.15.5 rounding out the largest package updates this week.

The latest Tumbleweed snapshot, 20190514, hailed in twenty recorded bug fixes for KDE Applications 19.04.1, which include improvements to Kontact, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Kdenlive, Spectacle and Umbrello. Among the highlighted fixes were a crash in KMail’s text sharing plugin that was fixed and regressions in the video editor Kdenlive were corrected. The Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (alsa) 1.1.9 dropped several patches and fixed a rate plugin for comparisons as well as added support for GCC’s LinkTimeOptimization. The VLC audio visual decoder package dav1d 0.3.1 provided arm optimization for Multiple Sequence Alignment Compressor (MSAC). The package that has the implementation of HTTP/2 and its header compression algorithm HPACK in C, nghttp2, fixed a compilation against modern LibreSSL in the 1.38.0 version update. Tcsh 6.21.00 ported patches and the 4.2.15 version of yast2-storage-ng worked on the partitioner to prevent edition of block devices that are part of a multi-device Btrfs. The snapshot is currently trending at a 96 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

There were three packages updated in snapshot 20190512. Mozilla Firefox 66.0.5 made further improvements to re-enable web extensions that had been disabled for users with a master password. The operating system information database libosinfo 1.5.0 fixed the the loading of the architecture value of OsinfoImages and added  Application Programming Interface (API) to set and get an OS from and to OsinfoTrees & OsinfoImages and osinfo-db 20190504 dropped an add support patch for Leap 15.1. The snapshot is currently trending at a 97 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190510 reined in GCC 9 and is the first Tumbleweed snapshot to make use of the GCC9 libraries. The snapshot produced several other major version updates. Both Wireshark 3.0.1 and QEMU 4.0 were included in the snapshot. QEMU 4.0 had tons of new improvements for arm, PowerPC, MIPS, s390, x86 and RISC-V. One of the more noteworthy changes were ARMv8 extensions for SB, PredInv, HPD, LOR, FHM, AA32HPD, PAuth, JSConv, CondM, FRINT, and BTI. Wireshark 3.0.1 added the  IP map feature back in a modernized form and addressed several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. Also, TShark now supports the -G elastic-mapping option which generates an ElasticSearch mapping file. GNOME 3.32.2 updated translations, fixed a crash when closing the updates dialog before the content has loaded, and gnome-maps updated some unnecessary instructions in turn-by-turn route searches. IPv6 had a few fixes with the update of the 5.0.13 Linux Kernel. Add support for setting the emulator scheduler parameters were made for QEMU with libvirt 5.3.0 and python-libvirt-python 5.3.0 added all new APIs and constants in libvirt 5.3.0. With all these major updates, the snapshot is remarkably still trending at a 96 rating on the snapshot reviewer.

KDE Plasma 5.15.5 came out just two days after the software was released from upstream in the 20190509 snapshot. The Breeze theme had fix build with Qt 4 and Plasma addons fixed a default visibility unit for non-metric locales. The support library used in the Xfce desktop exo 0.12.5 moved around components to align with the correct library versions. Scripting language php7 7.3.5 fixed a core dump when using server controls for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). The snapshot posted stable 94 rating on snapshot reviewer.

The snapshot that started off the week, 20190508, has four packages update. The packages were perl-libwww-perl 6.39, plasma-browser-integration 5.15.5, squid 4.7 and xdg-desktop-portal-kde 5.15.5. Squid 4.7 listed a bunch of CVEs that were fixed either without properly referencing them during the fix or 4.x branch was never affected by them. It also fixed stack-based buffer-overflow when parsing Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) messages. The snapshot posted stable 97 rating on snapshot reviewer.

InfinityBook Pro 13 as an important part of the openSUSE reference tests

Wednesday 15th of May 2019 07:18:43 AM
openSUSE and TUXEDO Computers want to offer the best user experience

KÖNIGSBRUNN, Germany — The cooperation between TUXEDO Computers and the openSUSE project has existed since 2018. This has been very successful, so that the release team of openSUSE has received a permanent loan from TUXEDO Computers and has developed and further developed the new version Leap 15.1 on the InfinityBook Pro 13, which will be released soon.

The openSUSE project mainly uses the InfinityBook Pro 13 from the TUXEDO Computers range. It offers numerous configuration options and is characterized by its mobility, runtime, performance, quality and flexibility. The internal tests at openSUSE were consistently positive. Further information and benchmarks can be found in the current joint success story, which is available for download.

TUXEDO Computers at the openSUSE Conference 2019

From 24th to 26th of May 2019, TUXEDO Computers will be part of the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany. There, the hardware manufacturer from Königsbrunn near Augsburg/Germany will present a selection of current devices. The laptops can be viewed and tested here. Via the TUXEDO Computers online shop, more than 20 devices can be configured according to individual requirements and equipped, for example, with the Linux distribution openSUSE. The openSUSE conference in May is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from all over the world together. Organized lectures, workshops and BoF sessions provide a setting for more informal meetings and hack sessions.

Further information and ticket can be found here: https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/oSC19

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition

Wednesday 15th of May 2019 12:00:54 AM

Today, we will start a logo competition for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019, which is going to be held in Bali, Indonesia. A logo is an essential material for the successful summit. As you have seen, the former openSUSE.Asia summits have their unique logos reflecting the communities where the summit took place. Following tradition, we have logo competition to collect great logo for this year’s summit.

The competition is open now and ends on 15 June 2019. The organizing team will send “Geeko Mystery Box” as an appreciation for the best logo designed. This year, logo will be voted by openSUSE.Asia committee.

Deadline: 15 June 2019 UTC 13:00

Announcement Winner: 25 June 2019

The Rules of the Contest are as follows:

  • The logo should be licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 and allow everyone to use the logo without attribution (BY) if your work is used as the logo of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. Note that the attribution is going to be shown on the summit website.
  • Design must be original and should not include any third party materials.
  • Both monochromes and color formats are essential for submission.
  • Submissions must be in SVG format.
  • Design should reflect the openSUSE community in Asia.
  • The logo should avoid the following things:
    • Brand names or trademarks of any kind.
    • Illustrations that may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
    • Sexually explicit or provocative images.
    • Violence or weapons.
    • Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery.
    • Discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
    • Bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals
    • Religious, political, or nationalist imagery.
  • The logo should follow “openSUSE Project Trademark Guidelines” published at https://en.opensuse.org/File:OpenSUSE_Trademark_Guidelines.pdf
  • The branding guidelines will be helpful to design your logo (optional)
    https://opensuse.github.io/branding-guidelines/

Please submit your design to opensuseasia-summit@googlegroups.com with the following entries:

  • Subject: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Design – [your name]
  • Your name and mail address to contact
  • A document about philosophy of the design (txt or pdf)
  • Vector file of the design with SVG format ONLY.
  • Bitmap of design in attachment — image size: 256*256 px at least, PNG format.
  • File size less than 512 KB.

The openSUSE.Asia Summit Committee will decide on the logos, subject to the condition, that the logo meets all the requirements. The final decision will be made by openSUSE.Asia Summit Committee and it may not be the highest scored design.

We recommend the artist to use Inkscape, a powerful, free and open source vector graphics tool for all kinds of design.

openSUSE.Asia Summit Logo 2014-2018

 

GNOME 3.32 Arrives in Month’s First Tumbleweed Snapshot

Thursday 9th of May 2019 09:28:59 AM

This month has produced a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot thus far and GNOME 3.32.1 was made available to Tumbleweed users in snapshot 20190505. The key packages that arrive so far this month are a newer Linux Kernel, a minor update for python-setuptools and the text editor GNU Nano fixed the spell checker from crashing.

The latest Tumbleweed snapshot, 20190507, which delivered nano 4.2, had a large update of changes for ghostscript 9.27; the versatile processor for PostScript data extensively cleaned up the Postscript name space and will now focus on the next releases to make SAFER the default mode of operation. The Optimized inner loop Runtime Compiler, orc 0.4.29, added decorator command line argument to add function decorators in header files. The latest python-setuptools 41.0.1 version fixed issues with the PEP 517, which specifies a standard API for systems which build Python packages. Text editor vim 8.1.1282 was also released in the snapshot. The snapshot is currently trending at a 95 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Mozilla Firefox 66.0.4 fixed extension certificate chain in snapshot 20190506. There was an improvement to network status detection with Network Manager with the glib2 2.60.2 update. The asn1c-based parser was replaced by an openssl-based PKCS parser with the kmod 26 package. The openblas_pthreads 0.3.6 had some changes for POWER6, PowerPC 970 and ARMv7 and ARMv8. The 1.28 perl-YAML package offered a security fix and xfsprogs updated to the 5.0.0 version from 4.20.0. The snapshot is currently trending stable at a 92 rating on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The snapshot that started out the month, snapshot 20190505, had a large amount of package updates. GNOME 3.32.1 was perhaps the most anticipated to arrive as the Taipei version offered various fixes to initial loading screens, updated the featured app ID,fixed Flatpak permissions to correctly show up for available apps and much more. The release introduced an experimental feature for Wayland desktop sessions that enables fractional scaling. Once enabled, desktops at certain resolutions can be scaled by non-integer values. The Advanced Trivial File Transfer Protocol (atftp) 0.7.2 version fixed a potential DoS bug introduced by a IPv6 patch. Compiler cache ccache 3.7.1 fixed a temporary file leak when the depend mode is enabled and the compiler produces standard error output; it also fixed crash when the debug mode is enabled and the output file is in a non-writable directory. Ceph added the lvmcache plugin and both the openSUSE Kubic and MicroOS installation images prevent MD/RAID auto-assembly if linuxrc says so. The  5.0.11 Linux Kernel added new USB Link Power Management (LPM) helpers. Other noteworthy packages updated in the snapshot were libsoup 2.66.1, libstorage-ng 4.1.119, webkit2gtk3 2.24.1 and yast2 4.2.1.  The snapshot is currently trending stable at a 96 rating on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Bali: Call for proposals is Open

Wednesday 1st of May 2019 01:00:09 AM

The openSUSE.Asia Committee call for proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 is now open.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun.  Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

Following the Asia Summit in Taipei last year, the sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit year 2019 will be at Udayana University, Bali Indonesia on October 5th and 6th, 2019. The past Asia Summits have had participants from Indonesia, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, India, Nepal, and etc.

Call for proposals

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Bali, please consider applying for the event.

Topics

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will invite talks/workshop relevant to openSUSE and other topics like Cloud, Virtualization, Container, Container Orchestration, Linux desktop environments and applications since openSUSE is a collection of various FLOSS products. The examples of the topics (not limited to) are as the following:

  • openSUSE (including Leap, Tumbleweed, Open Build Services, OpenQA, YaST)
  • openSUSE Kubic, Cloud, Virtualization, Container, and Container Orchestration
  • Embedded and IoT
  • Linux kernel and file system
  • Security (Access/Integrity control, Cryptography, Vulnerability management)
  • Desktop environments and applications (e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE)
  • Office suite, graphic art, multimedia (e.g. LibreOffice, Calligra, GIMP, Inkscape)
  • Multilingualization support (e.g. input methods, translation)
  • Other software running on openSUSE

Please note that non-technical talks are also welcome. For example:

  • Explanations of FLOSS technologies
  • Development, Quality Assurance, Translation
  • Tips & Tricks, Experience stories (success or fail), Best practice
  • Marketing and community management
  • Education
Types of sessions

We will invite the three types of sessions as below. If you apply for TSP, long talk or workshop is strongly recommended.

  • Workshop (120 min + Q&A)
  • Long talk (30 min + Q&A)
  • Short talk (15 min + Q&A)

We do not forget exciting lightning talks at this year’s summit. This year, call for lightning talks is expected to be open in July or later.

Schedule
  • The deadline of call for proposals: June 22, 2019
  • Notification to speakers:  July 15, 2019
  • Speakers TSP deadline: July 26, 2019
  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019: October 5th and 6th, 2019.
How to submit your proposal

Please submit your proposal to the following website: https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/summitasia19/program/proposals/new

Guide to write your proposal

Please write your proposal so that it is related to one or more topics

For example, if your talk is on security or desktop, it is better that it contains how to install these applications and/or demo on openSUSE.

Please clarify what the participants will learn from your talk.

  • The introduction of main technology or software in your talk
  • The main topic of your talk

Only workshop: please write how to use your time and what you need.

  • We recommend writing a simple timetable on your proposal
  • Please write the necessary equipment (laptops, internet access) to the Requirement field

Do not hesitate to contact the committee or a local community if you are not sure about writing your proposal or preparing your presentation.

Help promote openSUSE Leap 15.1!

Tuesday 30th of April 2019 10:00:43 AM

The release of openSUSE Leap 15.1 is about three weeks away. To help spread the word about the release, we have counters available at counter.opensuse.org and more artwork on https://github.com/openSUSE/artwork/. You can put these items on your social media or blog pages to make sure everybody knows that the Release is Coming!

For you blog and social media accounts

If you want to decorate your blog or website with a nice Leap 15.1 banner, grab one of these:

130×130 256×256 400×400 600×100

 

Release Counter

You can add the openSUSE 15.1 release counter to your website in various sizes by including the following html code in your blog:
<a href="http://en.opensuse.org/Portal:15.1"><img src="http://counter.opensuse.org/medium.png" border="0"/></a><br/>
“medium” is the size of the counter; it can also be “small” or “large” and we also have “wide” for a banner.

See the Countdown page on the openSUSE Wiki for more countdown information, code and tips!

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