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Updated: 1 hour 37 min ago

Intel launches first 10th Gen Ice Lake CPUs with 10nm fabrication

Tuesday 28th of May 2019 11:12:16 PM
Intel launched its first 10nm, 10th Gen Ice Lake Core CPUs with Gen 11 graphics, Intel Deep Learning Boost technology, 9 to 15W TDPs, and support for WiFi 6 and Thunderbolt 3. After leaking a roadmap of new 10th Gen Ice Lake and other future CPUs in late April, Intel officially launched its first Ice […]

Home automation and speaker board switches from Android Things to Linux

Tuesday 28th of May 2019 09:17:53 PM
Intrinsyc has re-released its Snapdragon 212-based Open-Q 212 module and 212A Home Hub Development Kit, switching from Android Things to Linux and adding a Qualcomm QCA4024 based option with BT 5.0, Thread, and ZigBee. Intrinsyc’s Open-Q 212A module and Development Kit, which were announced a year ago as along with several other Android Things production […]

Aaeon releases HW monitoring stack for Linux-on-Intel systems

Tuesday 28th of May 2019 06:41:11 PM
Aaeon’s BIOS-driven “HERO SDK” hardware monitoring stack supports Linux-driven Aaeon systems that use Intel’s Gemini, Whiskey, and Coffee Lake CPUs. The company has also posted specs for a Coffee Lake based “COM-CFHB6” COM Express. Aaeon announced a HERO SDK to “help developers with monitoring and controlling hardware on Aaeon platforms.” Available for modern Intel-based systems […]

Compact, Linux-driven edge server supports Nvidia T4 GPUs

Thursday 23rd of May 2019 03:28:33 PM
Atos’ suitcase-sized “BullSequana Edge” server runs Linux on a 6th Gen Xeon-D and supports AI edge processing via optional Nvidia T4 GPUs and FPGAs. Other specs include SATA, USB 3.0, GbE, and optional 10GbE, WiFi, 3G/4G, and LoRa. Establishing our scope of coverage on the low end is pretty easy — aside from the occasional […]

Space Station welcomes free-flying, Ubuntu-powered autonomous robots

Wednesday 22nd of May 2019 10:35:03 PM
NASA has deployed three free-flying “Astrobee” robots on the ISS for house-keeping tasks. The bots run Ubuntu/ROS and Android 7.1 on Snapdragon-based Inforce modules and a Wandboard and feature 3x payload bays, 6x cameras, and a touchscreen. We haven’t heard a news from the IBM Watson connected CIMON social robot since it debuted with a […]

Open-spec Omega2 LTE SBC features Cat 4 and GNSS

Wednesday 22nd of May 2019 03:45:50 PM
Onion’s $99, sandwich-style Omega2 LTE SBC for remote sensor applications has a MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Omega2S+ compute module, a Quectel EC25 chipset with LTE Cat 4 and GNSS, plus USB Type-C, microSD, and battery support. Last December, Onion updated its MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Omega2 board with a similarly OpenWrt-driven Omega2 Pro SBC that increased RAM to 512MB […]

Adapter enables offline speech board to work with Raspberry Pi

Tuesday 21st of May 2019 08:37:11 PM
Audeme has released a $6.50 “Raspberry Pi MOVI Adapter” board and API to enable a Raspberry Pi pairing with its MOVI Arduino Shield for offline speech recognition and synthesis. We’re used to seeing Arduino compatible, MCU-driven HATs and other add-ons for the Raspberry Pi, but in 2015 Audeme flipped that combo on its head with […]

Embedded PC with 6th or 7th Gen CPUs offers optional mini-PCIe and PCIe x4

Tuesday 21st of May 2019 03:39:04 PM
Aaeon’s barebones, semi-rugged “EPIC-KBS9-PUC” embedded PC runs on 6th or 7th Gen Core CPUs with up to 4x GbE and 2x serial plus 4x USB, mSATA, dual displays, and optional mini-PCIe, PCIe x4, or 2.5-inch HDD. Aaeon has spun last year’s EPIC form-factor EPIC-KBS board into an embedded system for light industrial duty including “automated […]

Google’s latest smart glasses power up with Snapdragon XR1

Monday 20th of May 2019 09:12:25 PM
Google has launched a $999 “Glass Enterprise Edition 2” headset that runs Android Oreo on a faster, quad-core, 1.7GHz Snapdragon XR1 SoC with an 8MP camera, WiFi-ac, BT 5.x, a USB Type-C port, and longer battery life. After backing away from its consumer Google Glass eyewear due in part to complaints about privacy, in 2017 […]

Four new Arduino Nano boards break price/performance/size barriers

Monday 20th of May 2019 06:12:12 PM
Arduino expanded its line of 45 x 18mm Nano boards with a $10 “Arduino Nano Every” model, a faster WiFi/BT-enabled IoT model, and two BLE boards. The new models offer price, performance, and size improvements over earlier Arduinos. At the start of this weekend’s Bay Area Maker Faire, which could be its last in that […]

Jetson Nano gains 3.4-megapixel HD camera

Thursday 16th of May 2019 08:06:47 PM
E-con has released a $79, 3.4-megapixel “e-CAM30_CUNANO” camera with a V4L2 Linux driver that supports Nvidia’s Jetson Nano dev kit. The MIPI-CSI2 driven S-mount camera streams 1080p@60 video. Nvidia’s new Linux-driven Jetson Nano, a scaled-down, lower power version of the Jetson TX2, now has a camera accessory thanks to E-con Systems’ $79 e-CAM30_CUNANO camera kit. […]

Schedule set for Aug. 21 Embedded Linux Conference in San Diego

Thursday 16th of May 2019 05:12:19 PM
The Linux Foundation has posted a schedule for the Aug. 21-23 North American edition of the Embedded Linux Conference/Open Source Summit mash-up in San Diego. Early bird registration ends May 20. As we noted in our preview of this year’s Linux Foundation events, the North American versions of the Embedded Linux Conference and Open Source […]

7-inch HD panel PC offers PoE and easy wall mounting

Tuesday 14th of May 2019 09:05:22 PM
Estone’s IP65 protected “PPC-4107” panel PC is touted for its easy installation. It runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6 and offers GbE with PoE, WiFi/BT, and a 7-inch, capacitive HD touchscreen. Estone Technology has announced a PPC-4107 panel PC designed primarily for wall-mounted residential, commercial, and industrial building automation, as well as HVAC monitoring […]

Khadas Vim3 SBC rides high with Cortex-A73 SoC and NVMe support

Tuesday 14th of May 2019 03:07:15 PM
Khadas has unveiled a “Khadas Vim3” SBC that runs Linux on an Amlogic S922X with 4x -A73 and 2x -A53 cores, with a future model featuring a neural processor. You get up to 4GB RAM and 32GB eMMC plus expansion via 40-pin GPIO, PCIe, and M.2 with NVMe. Shenzhen Wesion’s Khadas project will soon launch […]

Customizable SMARC module runs Linux on i.MX8M Mini or Nano

Monday 13th of May 2019 09:25:18 PM
Avnet’s “MSC SM2S-IMX8MINI” SMARC 2.0 module runs Linux on NXP’s i.MX8M Mini and future i.MX8M Nano SoCs with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC plus optional microSD, WiFi/BT, dual GbE, and -40 to 85°C support. We missed Avnet Integrated’s April announcement of the MSC SM2S-IMX8MINI, which is still the first i.MX8M Mini based SMARC […]

Open source thermostat runs openHAB on a Raspberry Pi Zero W

Monday 13th of May 2019 05:52:52 PM
MakeOpenStuff is launching a $145 “HestiaPi Touch” smart thermostat that runs a Linux-based openHAB stack on an RPI Zero W along with relays, a 3.5-inch display, and temperature, humidity, and pressure sensors. In late April, we looked at ionware’s ionware sdk1 home automation controller board, which runs the open source openHAB 2.0 IoT stack on […]

Linux-supported mini-PCIe modules offer Cat-M1 and Iridium modems for IoT

Friday 10th of May 2019 08:38:03 PM
Gateworks announced two mini-PCIe modems for its Linux-based SBCs aimed at IoT duty: a “GW16126” with Cat-M1 and BLE 5.0 and a “GW16130” satellite modem with an Iridium 9603N transceiver. Gateworks announced a pair of mini-PCIe modems that have been tested — and offer tech support — only on the company’s Linux-based SBCs. Most recently, […]

Raspberry Pi CM3+ based industrial controller has UPS and dual LAN ports

Friday 10th of May 2019 05:02:49 PM
Brainboxes’ $539 “BB-400 NeuronEdge Controller” is based on a Raspberry Pi CM3 B+ with 32GB eMMC, and offers 8x Arduino-controlled DIO, 2x LAN, WiFi/BT, a serial port, a mini-UPS and -25 to 80°C support. Brainboxes announced its BB-400 NeuronEdge Controller last July equipped with a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3), and has now begun […]

Text-to-speech Raspberry Pi add-on starts at $24

Thursday 9th of May 2019 10:06:50 PM
On Kickstarter: InvIoT is launching a $24 and up “TextToSpeech” .WAV player add-on board for the Raspberry Pi or Arduino that converts English, French or German text to speech via a 3W amp. Canton, Ohio based InvIoT is closing in on its Kickstarter goal for a multi-lingual text-to-speech add-on that connects to either a Raspberry […]

Grove Base Kit for Raspberry Pi gives you 10 sensors for $40

Thursday 9th of May 2019 02:54:51 PM
Seeed’s “Grove Base Kit for Raspberry Pi” is an RPi HAT aimed at newbies at less than half the price of its Starter Kit for the Pi. The kit has a few less sensors, but adds motion, moisture, and servo. After seeing our report yesterday on the Grove AI HAT for accelerating AI on the […]

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How to compile a Linux kernel in the 21st century

In computing, a kernel is the low-level software that handles communication with hardware and general system coordination. Aside from some initial firmware built into your computer's motherboard, when you start your computer, the kernel is what provides awareness that it has a hard drive and a screen and a keyboard and a network card. It's also the kernel's job to ensure equal time (more or less) is given to each component so that your graphics and audio and filesystem and network all run smoothly, even though they're running concurrently. The quest for hardware support, however, is ongoing, because the more hardware that gets released, the more stuff a kernel must adopt into its code to make the hardware work as expected. It's difficult to get accurate numbers, but the Linux kernel is certainly among the top kernels for hardware compatibility. Linux operates innumerable computers and mobile phones, embedded system on a chip (SoC) boards for hobbyist and industrial uses, RAID cards, sewing machines, and much more. Read more

Life with an offline laptop

When I think about an offline laptop, I immediately think I will miss IRC, mails, file synchronization, Mastodon and remote ssh to my servers. But do I really need it _all the time_?

As I started thinking about preparing an old laptop for the experiment, differents ideas with theirs pros and cons came to my mind.

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today's leftovers

  • Huawei mulls open-source chip design if US ban continues

    Huawei Technologies Co said Friday that it would consider using RISC-V, an open-source chip architecture, if the US government continues restricting its access to the latest technologies from the UK firm ARM Holdings for a long time. Xu Zhijun, rotating chairman of Huawei, said in an interview in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, that the company has already obtained the perpetual license to ARM's V8 architecture technology, so the US government ban does not affect its current launch schedule of chips. "If ARM's new technologies are not available in the future, we can also use RISC-V, an architecture which is open to all companies. The challenge is not insurmountable," Xu said.

  • From Spark To Airflow And Presto: Demystifying The Fast-Moving Cloud Data Stack

    Putting data to work starts with exploration, or inspecting data so that you know what you have to work with and its characteristics. Presto is excellent for exploring large, unstructured data sets because it uses storage efficiently, which keeps costs down, and it’s compatible with SQL, a language data analysts are familiar with.  Spark, on the other hand, is great for exploring data sets when programming is required, such as being able to manipulate data for use in data science or machine learning. It has good support for non-SQL interfaces.

  • Databricks launches AutoML Toolkit for model building and deployment

    Databricks today introduced its AutoML Toolkit, an automated end-to-end machine learning service made to accommodate developers with a range of experience.

  • DigitalOcean Managed Databases add MySQL, Redis support

    DigitalOcean Managed Databases introduced support for open source relational database MySQL and in-memory database Redis to eliminate the complexity involved in managing, scaling and securing database infrastructure. DigitalOcean, a cloud computing vendor offering infrastructure-as-a-service platforms for software developers, intends its new managed database offerings to enable developers to focus more exclusively on building apps and boosting productivity.

  • How Storj Is Building a Storage Cloud Without Owning a Single Disk

    Led by Docker's former CEO, the startup is crowdsourcing empty disk space from desktops and data centers around the world.

  • HPC Computing Is Replacing Supercomputers In Enterprise: Jeff Reser

    Jeff Reser – Global Product and Solutions Marketing Manager of SUSE talks about High-Performance Computing.

  • Mable & The Wood is a fairly unusual Metroidvania out now with Linux support

    Featuring a sweet fairy-powered protagonist wielding a sword so big they can hardly move, Mable & The Wood certainly presents a healthy amount of charm. Developed by Triplevision Games, a solo outfit from the UK, with publishing from Graffiti Games. "Mable is a passion project for me and for so long I worked on it by myself," said Andrew Stewart, Founder of Triplevision Games. “Thanks to Graffiti, I was able to have additional support to release the game sooner and on multiple platforms. Players on Steam can finally get their hands on the brilliant title today, and fear not Switch and Xbox One players, that version will be releasing very soon."

Programming: Python Shows, Golang and GNOME/GLib Work

  • Python Bytes: #144 Are you mocking me? It won't work!
  • Talk Python to Me: #226 Building Flask APIs for data scientists

    If you're a data scientist, how do you deliver your analysis and your models to the people who need them? A really good option is to serve them over Flask as an API. But there are some special considerations you might keep in mind. How should you structure this API? What type of project structures work best for data science and Flask web apps? That and much more on this episode of Talk Python To Me with guest AJ Pryor.

  • Golang or go home: how Curve is taking Golang to new heights

    Emerging only in 2009, Golang is still relatively new and not as widely used as other mainstream coding languages. This young language was incubated inside Google, and has already been proven to perform well on a massive scale. We wanted to share with you a few reasons why we love Golang (Go) and how Curve is using it. Go has excellent characteristics for scalability and services written using it typically have very small memory footprints. Because code is compiled into a single static binary, services can also be containerised with ease, making it much simpler to build and deploy. These attributes make Go an ideal choice for companies building microservices, as you can easily deploy into a highly available and scalable environment such as Kubernetes. Go has everything you need to build APIs as part of its standard library.

  • GTimeVal deprecation in GLib 2.61.2

    One of the latest changes in GLib (released in 2.61.2) is the deprecation of GTimeVal, g_get_current_time(), and a number of other time functions. This is because we can’t guarantee they’re wide enough on all platforms to be year-2038-safe. Instead, you should use GDateTime or, if you just need to store epoch time, guint64. They are year-2038-safe — and with that, GLib should be entirely year-2038-safe. GTimeVal is used in a number of places, and widespread (but simple) changes will need to be made to stop using it. You will likely have already seen some deprecation warnings popping up to inform you of this, if you use any C-based and GLib-based libraries. If you can’t allocate time to fixing these deprecation warnings yet, you can silence them by explicitly stating your minimum and maximum supported versions of GLib. If your minimum supported version of GLib is older than 2.62, you won’t see deprecation warnings for GTimeVal (since it was deprecated in 2.62, and your code is claiming to need to support older GLib versions than that).

  • Mayank Sharma: GSoC’19 - GVfs and the Google Backend demystified

    Note: Due to time limitations, I haven’t been able to devote much time to writing a blog post. Each time I started, some or the other thing bothered me and I ended up having a draft. My humble apologies to my readers. So, over the past 3 months or so, I’ve been working on the Google Backend for GVfs (GNOME Virtual File System), and as of today, the backend is in a state where it’s completely useable. Earlier, a large number of operations were disabled. So, if you tried to copy a file from one folder to the other, you’d be given an error “Operation not supported”. Now, you may be wondering what’s there in a simple copy operation that the developers/maintainers can’t fix, or shouldn’t something like Google Drive backend for GVfs receive better attention since a great deal of peope keep their important data on their G-Drive? The answer isn’t a yes or no, and it’s much more subjective since it pertains to the state of current open-source software. One of the big reasons has been that OSS always lacks man-power, and that the problem at hand wasn’t trivial in any sense. My mentor (Ondrej Holy), is the sole maintainer of a project as big as GVfs, and he certainly doesn’t have the time of look at each backend’s issues.