Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Kde Planet

Syndicate content
Planet KDE - http://planetKDE.org/
Updated: 2 hours 19 min ago

Latte Dock v0.9, "...a world to discover..."

Sunday 28th of July 2019 08:39:02 PM


Welcome Latte Dock v0.9.0!

After a full year of development a new stable branch is finally available! This is a version full of innovations, improvements and enhancements that improve the entire experience at all areas. I have written plenty of articles for introduced major features and in the same manner this article will focus only on highlights.


You can get  v0.9.0  from, download.kde.orgor  store.kde.org*
-----* archive has been signed with gpg key: 325E 97C3 2E60 1F5D 4EAD CF3A 5599 9050 A2D9 110E
- youtube presentation -

New Colors painting

Latte can now paint itself based on the current active window and when it is transparent can provide the best possible contrast for the underlying desktop background. You can read more at Latte and a Colors tale...
- top panel colored from kwrite color scheme -


Indicators

New indicators are now provided and are also self-packaged. You can install them from Latte Effects page  and you can find them online at kde store. You can already find Unity and DaskToPanel styles. You can read more at Latte and an Indicators tale...
- unity indicators style-
- dashtopanel indicators style -


Multiple Layouts Environment


With Latte you can have different layouts used at different Plasma Activities and at the same you can now share layouts to other layouts in order to achieve Shared Docks/Panels. You can read more at Latte and a Shared Layouts dream... 
- Top Panel layout shared to two other layouts -


Flexible Settings

All Dock/Panel settings have been redesigned in order to improve their meaning and at the same time give a way to the user to adjust their width/height scales according to their screen. You can read more at Latte and Flexible settings...



Improved Badges

Badge experience has been rethought and improved. New options have been added in order for the user to choose more prominent notification badges or use 3D style for them instead of the Material one used as default.
- persistent notification badge and shortcut badges -
  

Documentation and Reports

At Latte Global preferences you can now find some diagnostic reports in order to debug your layouts. If you are a developer and you are interested in Latte development you can now find plenty of information at kde techbase. Read more at
Latte, Documentation and Reports...



Fixes/Improvements

Plenty, plenty, plenty... v0.9 provides you much smoother and bug free experience compared to previous versions. Many areas have been redesigned and improved at areas.




Latte Development team

Because the community might have not been updated properly, Latte Development team is currently just me and this is the situation for the past two years. So for the upcoming development circle I will focus only on bug fixing and supporting the current massive features list. For new features I am not interested at all except if that feature enhances my own personal workflow. For any new features there should be an implementation to be discussed in order to be accepted and for any new features requests at bugs.kde.org I will leave them open for a month; if no developer is found then they will be closed afterwards.


Requirements

Minimum:
  • Qt >= 5.9
  • Plasma >=5.12
Proposed:
  • Qt >= 5.12
  • Plasma >=5.15
 

Donations

You can find Latte at Liberapay if you want to support,    

or you can split your donation between my active projects in kde store.

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 81

Sunday 28th of July 2019 06:01:50 AM

Here’s week 81 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative! And boy is there some delicious stuff today. In addition to new features and bugfixes, we’ve got a modernized look and feel for our settings windows to show off:

Doesn’t it look really good!? This design is months in the making, and it took quite a bit of work to pull it off. I’d like to thank Marco Martin, Filip Fila, and the rest of the KDE VDG team for making it happen. This is the first of several user interface changes we’re hoping to land in the Plasma 5.17 timeframe, and I hope you’ll like them!

In the meantime, look at all the other cool stuff that got done this week:

New Features Bugfixes & Performance Improvements User Interface Improvements

Next week, your name could be in this list! Not sure how? Just ask! I’ve helped mentor a number of new contributors recently and I’d love to help you, too! You can also check out https://community.kde.org/Get_Involved, and find out how you can help be a part of something that really matters. You don’t have to already be a programmer. I wasn’t when I got started. Try it, you’ll like it! We don’t bite!

If you find KDE software useful, consider making a tax-deductible donation to the KDE e.V. foundation.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Baba, Dicey Dungeons, Factorio and Enabling GameMode

  • Excellent rule-changing puzzle game Baba Is You is getting an official level editor

    Baba Is You, the truly excellent puzzle game where you have to break the rules of each level to beat them is getting a big update soon. See Also: previous thoughts on it here. How do you break these rules? Well, on each level there's logic blocks you can push around to change everything. Turn yourself into a rock, a jellyfish, make it so touching a wall wins instead of a flag you can't access and all kinds of really crazy things it becomes quite hilarious.

  • Dicey Dungeons outsold Terry Cavanagh's last two Steam games in the first month

    Terry Cavanagh, the indie developer behind VVVVVV, Super Hexagon and the latest Dicey Dungeons has a new blog post out talking about how well Dicey Dungeons has done and what's to come next. Leading up to the release, Cavanagh was doing a blog post each day for seven days. This latest post from yesterday then, is long overdue considering Dicey Dungeons launched in August.

  • Factorio is leaving Early Access in September next year

    As a result of the team behind Factorio feeling like it's going on for too long, they've now set a proper release date. In their latest Friday Facts update, they mentioned how their "when it's done" approach has served them well to create a high-quality game "but if we continued this way, we would be doing it basically forever". Part of the issue is that they want to work on new features and add content, instead of constant polishing. So they're setting a date publicly now "so we have to stick with it". With that in mind, it's going to leave Early Access on September 25, 2020. Development is not ending once they hit the big 1.0, they also don't want to say it's 100% finished either. Like a lot of games, as long as the money keeps coming in they will likely keep adding to it.

  • Enabling GameMode on Linux for best gaming performance

Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Now Patched Against Latest Intel CPU Flaws

After responding to the latest security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPU microarchitectures, Red Hat has released new Linux kernel security updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating systems to address the well-known ZombieLoad v2 flaw and other issues. The CentOS community also ported the updates for their CentOS Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 7 systems. The security vulnerabilities patched in this new Linux kernel security update are Machine Check Error on Page Size Change (IFU) (CVE-2018-12207), TSX Transaction Asynchronous Abort (TAA) (CVE-2019-11135), Intel GPU Denial Of Service while accessing MMIO in lower power state (CVE-2019-0154), and Intel GPU blitter manipulation that allows for arbitrary kernel memory write (CVE-2019-0155). Read more

Android Leftovers

Firefox vs. Chrome Browser Performance On Intel Ice Lake + Power/Memory Usage Tests

Using Firefox 70 (including WebRender) and Google Chrome 78, here are our latest round of Linux web browser benchmarks tested on the Dell XPS Ice Lake laptop. Making this round of Linux browser benchmarking more interesting is also including power consumption and RAM usage metrics for the different browser benchmarks. For those wondering about whether Firefox or Chrome makes the most sense for Linux laptops, these benchmarks from the Dell XPS with Intel Core i7-1065G7 will hopefully be useful. Ubuntu 19.10 with the Linux 5.3 kernel was running on this Intel Ice Lake laptop while using the official builds of Mozilla Firefox 70.0 (both out of the box and with WebRender) and Google Chrome 78. The AC system power consumption was monitored on battery and the total RAM usage was being monitored throughout testing as well. All of the benchmarking was carried out using the Phoronix Test Suite. Read more