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Linux Mint Turns Cinnamon Experience Bittersweet

Friday 24th of May 2019 12:00:00 PM
Linux Mint no longer may be an ideal choice for above-par performance out of the box, but it still can serve diehard users well with the right amount of post-installation tinkering. The Linux Mint distro clearly is the gold standard for measuring Cinnamon desktop integration. Linux Mint's developers turned the GNOME desktop alternative into one of the best Linux desktop choices. Linux Mint Cinnamon, however, may have lost some of its fresh minty flavor. The gold standard for version 19.1 Tessa seems to be a bit tarnished.

Budgeting Software Options to Keep Linux Users From Seeing Red

Friday 17th of May 2019 04:48:53 PM
Budgeting apps come in all sizes and shapes. Budget apps for Linux are part of a software category that has been all but abandoned. But take heart. A number of Web-based solutions will more than meet your budget-tracking needs. If you still insist on finding a pure Linux-based application, do not mix the concept of open source with free. If you want an actual free budget program that works well with your flavor of Linux OS, a Web-based offering may your only option. A few of these non-Linux solutions are proprietary products.

Digging for Bitcoin Is a Labor of Love

Thursday 16th of May 2019 07:25:46 PM
It would have been reasonable for those attending Josh Bressers' session at CypherCon -- myself included -- to expect a presentation by a cryptocurrency expert. It was billed as a talk about plumbing the depths of the bitcoin blockchain. When Bressers admitted that his material grew out of a hobby, I was surprised. Still, the talk was far from disappointing. Instead, "Spelunking the Bitcoin Blockchain" offered a glimpse of the impact that "amateurs," in the best sense of the word, ultimately have on the development of cryptocurrencies.

Elive Elevates Linux With Enlightenment

Friday 10th of May 2019 04:41:37 PM
The Elive distro's integration of the Debian Linux base and the Enlightenment desktop is a powerful combination. Together, they offer a unique computing platform that is powerful and flexible. Elive is not like most Linux distributions. It does not have a team of workers supporting multiple desktop offerings cranking out frequent upgrades each year. It also does not have a thriving community. In fact, Elive is one of a few Linux distros that aggressively asks for donations in order to download the installation ISO file.

Microsoft Becomes Master of Its Own Linux Kernel

Thursday 9th of May 2019 03:56:13 PM
Microsoft has announced that its own full Linux kernel will power WSL2, the newest version of the Windows Subsystem for Linux. Microsoft also introduced a Windows command line terminal that will add functionality to PowerShell and WSL. Both the in-house custom-built Linux kernel for WSL2 and the Windows command line terminal are intended primarily for developers. "This is a strong move in the battle against AWS," remarked Joshua Swartz, principal in the digital transformation practice at A.T. Kearney.

POP!_OS Makes Classic GNOME Simpler to Use

Friday 3rd of May 2019 04:29:55 PM
Are you Looking for a hassle-free Linux OS that is very user-friendly and extremely stable? Pop!_OS from System76 is a prime candidate to fit that order. Pop!_OS is an Ubuntu-based Linux distro featuring a custom GNOME desktop. Custom is *the* essential part of that description. The developers have done an impressive job of tailoring the classic GNOME environment into a unique desktop flavor. That Ubuntu connection is important. The combination of an Ubuntu base and customization of the very stable GNOME desktop makes POP!_OS a winning choice.

Open Source Flaw Management Shows Signs of Improvement: Report

Tuesday 30th of April 2019 08:16:35 PM
Almost two years after the infamous Equifax breach, many organizations still struggle to identify and manage open source risk across their portfolios. Meanwhile, the latest report tracking open source security shows a 40 percent rise in the average number of open source components detected in each codebase analyzed. The scanned software includes commercial applications. Synopsys has released its annual OSSRA, which examines the open source audit results of scanned codebases to identify insightful trends and patterns in open source usage.

MakuluLinux Core OS Is Dressed to Impress

Tuesday 30th of April 2019 12:00:00 PM
A new Linux OS gets to the core of Linux computing with a revamped desktop environment and a new way to have fun with your daily computing tasks. Developer Jacque Montague Raymer has debuted the MakuluLinux Core OS, and hopes it becomes the crown jewel of the Series 15 release family. MakuluLinux released the latest versions of family members LinDoz and Flash several months ago. While the Core entry integrates some of the features of its two cousins, it offers something new and exciting that brings MakululLinux to a higher level of usability.

How to Conquer Your Fear of Arch Linux

Sunday 28th of April 2019 03:09:16 PM
A recent episode of a Linux news podcast I keep up with featured an interview with a journalist who had written a piece for a non-Linux audience about giving it a try. It was surprisingly widely read. The writer's experience with some of the more popular desktop distributions had been overwhelmingly positive, and he said as much in his piece and during the interview. However, when the show's host asked whether he had tried Arch Linux, the journalist immediately and unequivocally dismissed the idea, as if it were obviously preposterous.

Feren OS: An Almost Flawless Linux Computing Platform

Friday 26th of April 2019 05:22:05 PM
Feren OS might well be the Linux computing game-changer that lures you away from your current operating system. Feren OS is based on Linux Mint 19 and the Cinnamon desktop environment that Linux Mint devs developed. This distro currently does not give you any other desktop options. However, it comes with a wide assortment of configuration choices that let you tweak the look and feel into almost any customized appearance you could want. This distro follows a partial rolling release system that constantly updates the OS for its lifetime.

Red Hat Breathes New Life Into Java

Tuesday 23rd of April 2019 06:54:49 PM
Red Hat is the new keeper of the keys to two popular versions of the open source Java implementation, OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11, having taken over stewardship from Oracle. Oracle ended commercial support for Java 8 and the Oracle JDK 8 implementation of Java SE last year. Oracle left the enterprise Java business when it transitioned support and maintenance of Java Platform to the Eclipse Foundation, where it is now known as "Jakarta EE." Red Hat's move enables developers to continue building apps with Java after Oracle abandoned support.

Condres OS Conjures Up Pleasing Arch Linux Transition

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:00:37 PM
Condres OS, a distro much like the defunct Apricity OS, could be a speedier replacement for Linux OSes that have turned slow to no-go in recent new releases. Condres OS is an Arch-based distro that offers many pleasing usability traits similar to three popular Debian-based distros: Linux Mint; Peppermint; and Zorin, which bundles ICE and Wine accouterments. Condres OS, as is typical of Arch distributions, comes with a rolling release upgrade model. It is very easy to install and use. Something else that impresses me with Condres OS is its software balance.

Q4OS and TDE: A Juicy Little Linux Secret

Friday 12th of April 2019 04:46:33 PM
Q4OS and the little-known Trinity Desktop Environment are an unbeatable combination that provides a powerful and flexible computing platform. I periodically revisit releases of interesting Linux distros and developing new desktops in my weekly quest for exciting and innovative choices. Some of these weekly forays turn up unexpected delights. Q4OS is one of them. I had used an earlier release of Q4OS on a test machine that recently died. That presented the perfect excuse to check out the latest snapshot of Q4OS 3.6 Centaurus.

Microsoft's Edge Goes With the Chromium Flow

Wednesday 10th of April 2019 12:00:00 PM
Microsoft has released the first Dev and Canary channel builds of the next version of Microsoft Edge, which is based on the Chromium open source project. The company last year revealed that it was reworking its Edge browser to be based on Chromium. Now the latest developments are ready for early testers and adopters on several versions of Windows and macOS. So far, however, no support is available for Linux. The new Microsoft Edge builds are available through preview channels called "Microsoft Edge Insider Channels."

Best Open Source Tools for Staying on Top of Projects

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 07:21:40 PM
The type of organizing tools you use to plan your projects can make your work routine more efficient and improve your productivity. A project management application is an essential tool in some business environments. This week's Linux Picks and Pans takes a deep dive into some of the best project management software solutions available for the Linux desktop. Project management applications are sophisticated and feature-rich. A key requirement for use of any project management planning tool is familiarity with Gantt charts.

New Zorin OS 15 Beta Is Worth the Wait

Thursday 28th of March 2019 07:08:15 PM
The Zorin OS 15 series, released last week in beta, introduces many changes to its desktop interface and utilities. It keeps Zorin on track with its goal of maintaining a Linux OS for everyone, not just advanced Linux users. Zorin OS 15 beta is the first major release since Zorin OS 12 in late 2016. This edition is well worth the wait. Major releases of Zorin OS come only once every two years. Minor updates are released every few months as needed. Zorin OS 15 is based on Ubuntu 18.04.2 Long Term Support.

Telegram Provides Nuclear Option to Erase Sent Messages

Tuesday 26th of March 2019 12:00:00 PM
Telegram Messaging has introduced a new privacy rights feature that allows user to delete not only their own comments, but also those of all other participants in the message thread on all devices that received the conversation. Although the move is meant to bolster privacy, it's likely to spark some controversy.Telegram Messenger allows users to send free messages by using a WiFi connection or mobile data allowance with optional end-to-end encryption and encrypted local storage for Secret Chats.

SparkyLinux Incinerates the Hassle Factor

Thursday 21st of March 2019 05:24:35 PM
SparkyLinux can ignite your daily computing experience. Its spark is pushing me to rethink my computing priorities. Regularly reviewing so many Linux operating systems for Linux Picks and Pans has a serious consequence for my computing sanity. Normally, I have a flirtatious episode with a new release each week. I'm always on the lookout for something new and shiny. Then my flash-in-the-pan relationship flames out in favor of some other newly released rival a week later. I love the freedom of choice that open source Linux OSes offer.

MOREbot Introduces Kids to Robotics Using 3D Printed Parts

Tuesday 19th of March 2019 06:05:09 PM
MORE Technologies last week launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise $20,000 for development of its open source robot ecosystem. The company will fund the project if it reaches its goal by April 21. As of this writing, $6,485 of that $20,000 goal has been pledged. It teaches real tech skills to the next generation of innovators and problem solvers using MOREbot -- a series of open source, customizable robotics kits designed for classroom or home use. MOREbot is an expandable modular STEM learning robotic ecosystem.

8 Great Linux Time-Tracker Apps to Keep You on Task

Thursday 14th of March 2019 05:11:37 PM
Time-tracking software records the time you spend on tasks. The time-tracking helps you create billing reports, prepare invoices, and analyze your workflow for better efficiency. This week's Linux Picks and Pans product review highlights some of the best free time-tracking applications for Linux. Most of these apps offer basic time-tracking functionality and little else. Some have some very useful additional features. A few are strictly old school Linux with only command line and/or text-based input and display.

More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.2-rc2

Hey, what's to say? Fairly normal rc2, no real highlights - I think most of the diff is the SPDX updates. Who am I kidding? The highlight of the week was clearly Finland winning the ice hockey world championships. So once you sober up from the celebration, go test, Linus Read more Also: Linux 5.2-rc2 Kernel Released As The "Golden Lions"

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Linux Gaming News Punch, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order

Review: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0

My experiment with RHEL 8 got off to a rough start. Going through the on-line registration process produced some errors and ended up with me getting the wrong ISO which, in turn, resulted in some confusion and delays in getting the distribution installed. Things then began to look up as RHEL 8 did a good job of detecting my system's hardware, registered itself without incident and offered good performance on physical hardware. I was particularly pleased that the distribution appears to detect whether our video card will work well with Wayland and either displays or hides Wayland sessions in response. I did have some trouble with the GNOME Classic Wayland session and GNOME Shell on X.Org was a bit sluggish. However, the Classic session on X.Org and GNOME Shell on Wayland both worked very well. In short, it's worthwhile to explore each of the four desktop options to see what works best for the individual. The big issues I ran into with RHEL were with regards to software management. Both GNOME Software and the Cockpit screen for managing applications failed to work at all, whether run as root or a regular user. When using the command line dnf package manager, the utility failed to perform searches unless run with sudo and occasionally crashed. In a similar vein, the Bash feature that checks for matching packages when the user types a command name it doesn't recognize does not work and produces a lengthy error. There were some security features or design choices that I think will mostly appeal to enterprise users, but are less favourable in home or small office environments. Allowing remote root logins by default on the Workstation role rubs me the wrong way, though I realize it is often useful when setting up servers. The enforced complex passwords are similarly better suited to offices than home users. One feature which I think most people will enjoy is SELinux which offers an extra layer of security, thought I wish the Cockpit feature to toggle SELinux had worked to make trouble-shooting easier. I was not surprised that RHEL avoids shipping some media codecs. The company has always been cautious in this regard. I had hoped that trying to find and install the codecs would have provided links to purchase the add-ons or connect us with a Red Hat-supplied repository. Instead we are redirected through a chain of Fedora documentation until we come to a third-party website which currently does not offer the desired packages. Ultimately, while RHEL does some things well, such as hardware support, desktop performance, and providing stable (if conservative) versions of applications, I found my trial highly frustrating. Many features simply do not work, or crash, or use a lot of resources, or need to be worked around to make RHEL function as a workstation distribution. Some people may correctly point out RHEL is mostly targeting servers rather than workstations, but there too there are a number of problems. Performance and stability are provided, but the issues I ran into with Cockpit, permission concerns, and command line package management are all hurdles for me when trying to run RHEL in a server role. I find myself looking forward to the launch of CentOS 8 (which will probably arrive later this year), as CentOS 8 uses the same source code as RHEL, but is not tied to the same subscription model and package repositories. I am curious to see how much of a practical effect this has on the free, community version of the same software. Read more

GNOME 3.34 Revamps the Wallpaper Picker (And Fixes a Longstanding Issue Too)

The upcoming release of GNOME 3.34 will finally solve a long standing deficiency in the desktop’s background wallpaper management. Now, I’ve written about various quirks in GNOME wallpaper handling before, but it’s the lack of option to pick a random wallpaper from a random directory via the Settings > Background panel that is, by far, my biggest bug bear. Ubuntu 19.04 ships with GNOME 3.32. Here, the only wallpapers available to select via the Settings > Background section are those the system ships with and any top-level images placed in ~/Pictures — nothing else is selectable. So, to set a random image as a wallpaper in GNOME 3.32 I tend to ignore the background settings panel altogether and instead use the image viewer’s File > Set as background… option (or the similar Nautilus right-click setting). Thankfully, not for much longer! Read more