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Updated: 2 hours 53 min ago

Linux Mint 20: Still the best Linux desktop despite one quirk

Wednesday 1st of July 2020 07:57:00 PM
As usual, Linux Mint's latest release, Mint 20, is better than ever, but its developers' refusal to make it easy to use Ubuntu Snap is a trifle annoying.

Baidu joins Open Invention Network Linux patent protection group

Tuesday 30th of June 2020 04:01:04 AM
Baidu, China's Google, and a leading artificial intelligence (AI) company are joining the open-source and Linux patent protection group, Open Invention Network.

Linus Torvalds on the future of Linux kernel developers and development

Monday 29th of June 2020 06:42:00 PM
Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds talked about Linux developers, hardware, and coding in their latest, and first virtual Linux conversation.

Puppet introduces beta of cloud-native, event-driven DevOps program: Relay

Thursday 25th of June 2020 11:52:54 AM
The open-source wants to expand DevOps to cover cloud and containers with its newest program.

New Cloud Foundry command-line interface arrives

Wednesday 24th of June 2020 09:05:54 PM
Even the most advanced clouds can still use a little shell command goodness.

Canonical's Ubuntu 20.04 Linux now available on Dell XPS 13

Wednesday 24th of June 2020 04:10:00 PM
The first laptop with Canonical's latest long-support version of Ubuntu is Dell's Linux specific XPS 13 Developer Edition.

Red Hat upgrades Ansible DevOps and new Certified Ansible Content Collections

Wednesday 24th of June 2020 04:06:42 PM
Red Hat's improved its core Ansible product and made it easier than ever to deploy Ansible-based solutions on multiple clouds.

Microsoft releases Defender ATP for Linux

Wednesday 24th of June 2020 03:42:00 PM
Yes, you read that headline correctly, Microsoft has just released a security program for Linux.

ARM and Linux take the supercomputer TOP500 crown

Tuesday 23rd of June 2020 04:47:00 PM
For the first time, an ARM-powered supercomputer took first place in the TOP500 supercomputer competition.

Linux Foundation and Harvard announce Linux and open-source contributor security survey

Thursday 18th of June 2020 05:59:00 PM
Securing Free/Libre and open-source software (FLOSS) is a big deal and The Linux Foundation wants to know exactly how programmers are dealing with security issues.

DataStax Vector: Making Cassandra NoSQL DBMS clusters more manageable

Thursday 18th of June 2020 02:22:00 PM
DataStax is readying Vector AI to make monitoring and managing Apache Cassandra easier.

Best Chromebooks for work in 2020: Which high-end laptop is right for your business?

Wednesday 17th of June 2020 02:39:00 PM
With the coronavirus pandemic making working from home more popular than ever, business-class Chromebooks are coming to the forefront.

Faster than ever, Apache Cassandra 4.0 beta is on its way

Thursday 11th of June 2020 08:13:00 PM
The popular NoSQL database management system Apache Cassandra promises to be faster and more stable than ever in its next release.

Dell XPS 13 Linux Developer Edition (2020) hands-on: A great laptop for hard-working developers

Wednesday 10th of June 2020 09:08:00 PM
Like its ancestors before it, the latest Dell 13 Linux Developer Edition is an exceptional programmers' laptop.

Ubuntu opens the door to talking with Linux Mint about Snap

Monday 8th of June 2020 12:06:00 PM
Ubuntu explains its position about the Chromium Snap. Canonical would welcome the chance to talk with Linux Mint about their issues with Snap.

Linux Mint dumps Ubuntu Snap

Friday 5th of June 2020 06:52:00 PM
The popular desktop Linux distribution, Linux Mint, wants nothing to do with Ubuntu's Snap software installation system.

NextCloud gets bigger and better with Nextcloud Hub 19

Thursday 4th of June 2020 09:12:27 PM
The best open-source, Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud, Nextcloud, is getting even better with improved security and built-in Collabora Online office Software-as-a-Service.

Lenovo believes in the Linux desktop

Wednesday 3rd of June 2020 08:20:00 PM
Lenovo is returning to its role as a leading Linux desktop supporter. It will certify and preload its entire Thinkpad/station lineup for Linux.

The Linux Foundation introduces Cloud Engineer Bootcamp for cloud job seekers

Wednesday 3rd of June 2020 05:30:00 PM
Want to work in the cloud, but need help getting started? The Linux Foundation can come to your aid with its new Cloud Engineer Bootcamp.

From Earth to orbit with Linux and SpaceX

Wednesday 3rd of June 2020 12:30:00 PM
SpaceX's workhorse Falcon 9 rocket, which flew NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station, is powered by liquid oxygen, rocket-grade kerosene, and Linux.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: Security, GCC, Fedora, CentOS and Miscellany

  • Red Hat Insights: Your very own security consultant

    When it comes to system maintenance and management, the most critical aspect is to keep all operating systems as safe and secure as possible. This is where Red Hat Insights steps in - it helps users manage security in an easy and convenient way by analyzing system configurations. Since Red Hat Summit 2020, Red Hat Insights has extended capabilities to manage operational efficiency and security risks. Note: Insights is included in all Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscriptions.

  • Improve your code: Tales from confinement without a debugger

    Now that I have coded for some years, I’ve noticed that I have picked up some bad habits along the way. Over-dependence on the debugger is one of them. I often use it as a high-powered crutch, which frequently leads me waist-deep into stack traces, rarely stopping to think things through. I get lost inside 20 levels of recursion and wonder why an irrelevant variable is being tickled. Granted, there are many good uses for a debugger, but I’m at 40% on the good use scale. My uses usually start benign but then degrade into cancerous abstractions. So, for my 20th GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) hacking anniversary, I decided to give myself the challenge of one month without a debugger. Here is the tale. [...] When I first started hacking GCC, newbies at Red Hat were put on old toolchain support duty. Nine times out of 10, those bugs had already been fixed upstream. I got quite adept at running two parallel gdbs, single-stepping until I found a difference in the codes, and eventually finding the patch that fixed the bug. My technique was effective, but taught me very little about the underlying problem that I was “fixing.” Now, I’m a gray-bearded old fogey, and I can’t count the number of times I have put a breakpoint on the garbage collector to find out who created a chunk of memory, just to save time analyzing the where of a given optimization.

  • How Fedora and Outreachy Helped Me Hone My Flexibility With Timelines

    Update: I’m in the seventh week of my Outreachy internship with Fedora! I am working to create a GraphQL API for Bodhi. The following image shows a Gantt chart of the ideal timeline that my mentors and I came up with to get the project up and running...

  • Fedora 33 Btrfs by default Test Day 2020-07-08

    A new change proposal has been submitted for the Fedora 33 release cycle which entails usage of btrfs by default for Workstations, Servers and Spins across x86_64 and ARM architectures As a result, QA teams have organized a test day on Wed, July 08, 2020. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test cases and materials you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • CentOS Community newsletter, July 2020 (#2007)

    We are pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 8.2.2004. Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux 8 and is tagged as 2004, derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 Source Code.

  • CentOS Stream Begins Seeing RHEL 8.3 Bits, Real-Time Repository

    Introduced alongside CentOS 8 last year was CentOS Stream as a developer-focused, rolling-release of CentOS/RHEL. With those processes getting squared away and CentOS recently debuting its RHEL 8.2 rebuild, CentOS Stream is beginning to see new and interesting material. In particular, early work from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3 development is beginning to hit CentOS Stream. There is also an updated installer for CentOS Stream, new modules are coming, and perhaps most significant is the introduction of a real-time/RT repository. These RT packages are optimized for latency-sensitive workloads. The repository can be optionally enabled for those interested in optimizing their software stack for RT workloads.

  • Learn CentOS - Managing Storage

    The Learn CentOS series continues with another episode, this time checking out the concept of storage. The /etc/fstab file will be covered, as well as mounting, unmounting, and formatting storage media.

  • VR hits a new milestone, Mozilla's growing open source voice library, change in Redis maintainers, and more open source news

    In this week’s edition of our open source news roundup, Mozilla updates its open source voice stack, a tool to tame VR cybersickness, and more open source news.

Kernel: Better Mouse Reporting, GNU Guix Without Linux, New Linux on Ancient PC, Speech Police and Zstd

  • Better Mouse Reporting For The Linux Virtual Terminal Is Being Worked On

    The mouse reporting functionality offered by the Linux VT console is rather basic and seemingly seldom used by text-based, mouse-aware programs. However, a series of patches was sent out this week for improving the implementation to provide for more xterm-like mouse reporting.

  • GNU Guix Begins Publishing System Images Based On Hurd

    Earlier this year was news of GNU Guix wanting to replace their Linux kernel usage with the Hurd microkernel. For those interested, the project recently began producing system images with indeed Hurd wired up for this software distribution. The plans laid out earlier this year were on switching to Hurd for increasing "security and freedom for their users." A Phoronix reader tipped us off that the Guix project is indeed offering the system images powered by the Hurd micro-kernel.

  • Redditor Boots Linux Kernel 5.8 On 30-Year-Old Intel Processor via Floppy Disk

    Do you remember your first PC on which you booted Linux from floppy? Well, Floppy disk is almost dead. The majority of people now use USB sticks or DVDs to install Linux distros on their PCs. However, retro enthusiasts love to revive their old hardware and relive the flashback. Recently, a Redditor who goes by the name ‘FozzTexx’ demonstrated the latest stable Linux Kernel 5.8.0-rc2+ running from his floppy disk. He successfully booted a tiny kernel on a 30-year-old 32-bit Intel 80486 (i486 or 486) CPU.

  • Linux kernel developers: This new BLM coding style avoids words like blacklist

    Key Linux kernel maintainers have largely welcomed a new proposal by Intel engineer and fellow kernel maintainer Dan Williams to introduce inclusive terminology in the kernel's official coding-style document. The first to sign off on Williams' proposal were Chris Mason and Greg Kroah-Hartman. But other maintainers have approved the proposal too, which requires kernel developers to avoid using the words 'slave', for development trees and branches, and 'blacklist'.

  • Zstd'ing The Kernel Might See Mainline With Linux 5.9 For Faster Boot Times

    It looks like the long ongoing work for compressing the Linux kernel image with Zstd might finally soon be mainlined, potentially for next month's Linux 5.9 cycle kicking off as the "v6" patches sent out this week were done as a Git pull request. Nick Terrell of Facebook has been the one herding these Zstd patches for the Linux kernel and trying to get them upstream. Facebook is already using them in production on their many web servers. Facebook found that using a Zstd compressed kernel image shrunk their x86_64 decompression time from 12 seconds to 3 seconds with formerly using XZ compression. The actual boot time dropped by about two seconds using Zstd over XZ. When testing the Zstd-compressed kernel on their AArch64 servers, Facebook found the decompression time shrunk from 27 seconds to 8 seconds.

Huawei’s ARM-based desktop PC could leave you scratching your head

Part of the problem is Huawei’s replacement for Windows, a Linux-based Unity OS (not to be confused with Ubuntu’s Unity). While the OS itself performed smoothly, the apps running on it didn’t. The YouTuber even had to pay 800 RMB ($115) to get access to the UOS app store which had a very limited selection of software. Any Linux user would expect popular proprietary software like Microsoft Office and Adobe’s Creative apps to be absent but the store also strangely didn’t support running 32-bit programs either. Read more

Games: Hammer Dongers, Destination Sol, Basement, and Railway Empire

  • Floor-destroying party game 'Hammer Dongers' adds rockets and new maps

    Hammer Dongers is a great idea for a party game, pitting up to four people against each other in small levels with the ability to destroy the very ground beneath your feet. Currently free while it's in development, not only does it have a good idea but it's also a huge amount of fun because the gameplay is nicely streamlined. You each start with a big Hammer, which you can use to smash the ground and have it fall away to hopefully take down an opponent. With the latest update, they've overhauled the maps with a Castle theme to include new traps and contraptions. There's also a Rocket Launcher because why the heck not.

  • Free and open source space RPG 'Destination Sol' has a big 2.0 release

    Destination Sol might not be a name known to all but it's a sweet little space exploration RPG that's free and open source, plus it's getting big updates. The 2.0 release of Destination Sol was released on July 5, bringing with it much easier and expanded modding support. So easy in fact, you should be able to download extra Modules and drop them into the Modules folder to have them work. This release also adds in more ships, more guns and more of everything else.

  • Make nefarious goods in Basement, now up on GOG

    Basement, a game about building up a business making some questionable goods to fund development of a video game is now available DRM-free on GOG. You need to deal with other gangs, cops, crazy junkies, a mysterious investor and even ghosts from the past. After being in Early Access for quite some time and in development for 5 years, towards the end of last year it fully released on Steam and now you can also pick it up from GOG.

  • Railway Empire is getting a Complete Collection on August 7

    Publisher Kalypso Media and their in-house developer Gaming Minds Studios have announced that Railway Empire - Complete Collection is coming on August 7. After over two years of updates some of which overhauled and improved major parts of the game like re-workings of competitor AI, the addition of a gigantic complete North American map, almost 20 free updates, an all-new Challenge Mode, new buildings and countless other quality of life improvements and bug fixes it seems they're finally done with it. This full edition will bring together all of the eight expansions under one roof, giving new players the easy option of getting it all together.