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Softpedia News / Linux
Updated: 3 hours 20 min ago

Wine 5.0 Officially Released with Multi-Monitor and Vulkan 1.1 Support, More

Tuesday 21st of January 2020 06:50:00 PM
Big news today for Linux gamers and ex-Windows users as the final release of the Wine 5.0 software is now officially available for download with numerous new features and improvements.

After being in development for more than one year, Wine 5.0 is finally here with a lot of enhancements, starting with support for multi-monitor configurations, the reimplementation of the XAudio2 low-level audio API, Vulkan 1.1.126 support, as well as built-in modules in PE (Portable Executable) format.

"This release is dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, who passed away in August 2019 at the young age of 30. Józef was a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation, and the lead developer of the vkd3d project. His skills and his kindness are sorely missed by all of us," reads today's announcement.

Improvements to Windows games

Wine 5.0 also brings improvements to numerous Windows games, so Linux gamers... (read more)

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 Enters Beta with Enhanced User Experience, More

Tuesday 21st of January 2020 04:04:00 PM
Red Hat announced today the availability of the beta version of the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 operating system, the second maintenance update to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 series.

Packed with six months' worth of updates and bug fixes, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 promises to enhance the user experience by implementing a new way for both new and existing users to register a Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription, directly from the installer. As such, users won't have to perform a YUM update after installation to confirm the subscription.

"Additionally, Red Hat Insights, Red Hat's proactive management analytics service that helps to keep RHEL systems running at a high level, can be enabled during the installation process. This capability delivers Insights monitoring immediately after the installation is finished," said Red Hat.

Furthermore, Red Hat Ente... (read more)

Canonical Announces Anbox Cloud, Ubuntu-Powered Scalable Android in the Cloud

Tuesday 21st of January 2020 08:01:01 AM
Canonical announced today a new product aimed at enterprises, allowing them to distribute Android applications at scale from the cloud.

Meet Anbox Cloud, a new platform developed by Canonical to conternize Android workloads as a guest operating system for the distribution of Android mobile apps at a scale directly from a cloud provider. As its name implies, Anbox Cloud is based on the Anbox technology, a free and open-source compatibility layer that allows Android apps to run on GNU/Linux distributions.

Based on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS kernel, Anbox Cloud takes advantage of Canonical's secure and isolated LXD system containers to offer a more lightweight alternative to emulating Android in virtual machines. Anbox Cloud also uses Canonical's MAAS (Metal as a Service) for remote infrastructure provisioning and Juju for easy deployment and management at reduced operational costs.

"Driven by emerging 5G networks and edge computing, millions of users will benefit from acc... (read more)

GParted 1.1 Open-Source Partition Editor Is Out with Various Enhancements, Fixes

Monday 20th of January 2020 09:52:00 PM
GParted, the open-source partition editor used by numerous Linux-based live systems to help users partition their disk drives before installing the OS, has been updated today to version 1.1.0.

Curtis Gedak released GParted 1.1.0, a maintenance update aiming to include enhancements, bug fixes, as well as translation updates. Highlights include the adoption of faster minfo and mdir to read FAT16 and FAT32 usage, and the ability to calculate the size of JFS partitions more accurately.

Moreover, this release adds support for recognizing ATARAID members, as well as to detect their busy status, and improves the moving of locked LUKS-encrypted partition. The xvfb-run dependency has been added and it's required for the "make check" and "make distcheck" commands during compilation.

Bug fixes

Of course, GParted 1.1.0 also addresses various issues reported by users or discovered by the development team since the last release. Among the bugs fixed, we can me... (read more)

AMD Zen 3 Microcode Spotted in the Linux Kernel

Monday 20th of January 2020 06:47:00 AM
AMD Zen 3 microcode has recently been spotted in the Linux kernel, months ahead of the expected launch of this new line of processors.

The discovery was shared on Twitter by @KOMACHI_ENSAKA, who says the new code is linked with EDAC, or Error Detection and Correction.

By the looks of things, the Linux kernel is updated to support the AMD Family 19h processors, which represents the new Zen 3-based chip family.

As the leaker notes, AMD 17h series can still be used, as they’re already supported – Family 17h is the existing AMD Zen 2 series.

Possible launch at Computex?

While this new report is without a doubt good news for the Linux ecosystem, it’s also a sign that we’re getting closer to the public unveiling of AMD Zen 3.

Official details on the launch date are still very limited, as AMD has remained rather tight-lipped on any specifics. However, the company did confirm t... (read more)

Manjaro Linux Laptop with 10th Gen Intel Chips to Launch as “Dell XPS 13 Killer”

Monday 20th of January 2020 05:55:00 AM
Tuxedo Computers has teased new laptops coming with high-end specs, including an AMD Ryzen model that would specifically be aimed at competing against Dell XPS 13.

Manjaro Lead Project Developer Philip Müller confirmed in an interview with Forbes that a partnership with Tuxedo Computers will bring us several new Linux laptops powered by Intel’s 10th Generation Core i7 chips.

In essence updated versions of the InfinityBook Pro 15 model, the Manjaro-powered laptops will boast a maximum of 64GB RAM and feature 2TB SSD storage thanks to a Samsung EVO Plus NVMe drive.

Like several other Tuxedo Computers, all devices support aftermarket upgrades without losing warranty.

“All devices have a maintenance-friendly design. Depending on the model, the essential hardware components such as processor, drive, hard disks, RAM, WIFI mod... (read more)

PinePhone, the $149 Linux Phone, Has Started Shipping for the Brave of Heart

Friday 17th of January 2020 11:08:00 PM
The long-anticipated PinePhone Linux-powered smartphone has finally started shipping to customers who were brave enough to purchase the first batch.

The PinePhone Linux phone has been available for pre-order since mid-November 2019, and those who bought one paid as low as $149 USD for the device, which doesn't ship with an operating system preinstalled. After a bit of delay, the PinePhone is now finally shipping to customers, starting today, January 17th.

"We’re now ready and I am happy to confirm that PinePhones will begin shipping on January 17th, 2020," said PINE64's Lukasz Erecinski. "The dispatch process will take a couple of days, however, so your unit may ship anytime between the 17th and 25th. At any rate, you’ll have your PinePhone soon."

What you need to know about the PinePhone Braveheart Editionread more)

Google is Reportedly Working to Bring Steam Support to Chromebooks

Friday 17th of January 2020 04:16:00 PM
It would appear that Google is working to bring official Steam support to its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for supported Chromebook devices.

According to a report from the Android Police website, Kan Liu, director of product management for Google's Chrome OS, revealed the fact that Steam support could be enabled on Chrome OS in the near future by taking advantage of the implementation of support for Linux apps that landed in Chrome OS last year.

While this might come as good news for Chromebook owners, the fact of the matter is that Chrome OS devices aren't powerful enough to support many of the games available on Steam. If Steam comes to Chrome OS, most probably Google will only enable it only on its most powerful Chromebooks.

Kan Liu did not said when Steam will be coming to Chrome OS, and neither Google or Valve have confirmed this ... (read more)

Zorin OS Makes It Easy to Deploy Linux-Powered Computers in Schools, Businesses

Thursday 16th of January 2020 05:10:00 PM
The Zorin OS development team announced today a new tool to make it easier for organizations to deploy a fleet of Linux-powered computers and administrate them from a a centralized place.

Meet Zorin Grid, an in-house built tool whose whole purpose is to make it simple for IT administrators to set up, manage, and secure a fleet of Linux-powered computers in any type of organization, including small and medium sized businesses or schools and universities. The tool also provides a centralized place to administrate all these computers.

"We've been working on a major new product over the past 2 years, and we’re excited to finally introduce it to you today. We're moving onto the next part of the Zorin OS master plan: to bring Linux into the working world; into businesses, schools, and organizations. We’re making this possible with the help of our new product called Zorin Grid," reads today's read more)

Xfce 4.16 Desktop Environment Switches to Client-Side Decorations

Thursday 16th of January 2020 04:52:00 PM
Work on the upcoming Xfce 4.16 desktop environment continues in 2020 with a lot of new features and improvements that the community can test drive using the Xfce 4.15 development branch.

Xfce developer Simon Steinbeiß reports on the latest changes and improvements that have been added to the forthcoming Xfce 4.16 desktop environment release, and the biggest new feature so far is support for client-side decorations (CSD) or GtkHeaderBars for all dialogs.

"The first big step in this direction has now happened in libxfce4ui, our main user interface library. With the change, almost all dialogs will be converted to using CSD by default without any code changes in existing projects," said developer Simon Steinbeiß in a recent blog post.

Dark panel now enabled by default

Among other enhancements that landed lately for the Xfce 4.16 desktop environment, we c... (read more)

elementary OS 6 Will Be Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa)

Thursday 16th of January 2020 03:58:00 PM
The elementary OS team is kicking off 2020 with a retrospective of the things they managed to do in 2019 and a set of goals for the year ahead as they want to further improve their Linux-based operating system.

In a recent blog post, elementary co-founder Cassidy James Blaede talks about an "intense and record-breaking" 2019 and also highlights some of the major goals for 2020 while also revealing the fact that work on the next major release, elementary OS 6, is on the way and it will be based on the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system.

"Ubuntu 20.04 LTS will be coming out this year, and subsequently we plan to release elementary OS 6 with a 20.04 base. We've begun some of the underlying work to migrate to and build against newer l... (read more)

KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Here's What's New

Thursday 16th of January 2020 02:34:00 PM
The KDE Project announced today the general availability of the beta version of the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems and Linux-powered devices.

KDE Plasma 5.18 is a major version of the popular Linux desktop environment as it's the third LTS (Long Term Support) series, coming three and a half years after the first LTS branch and two years after the second one. This means that KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS will be supported with maintenance update for the next two years.

"LTS stands for "Long Term Support" and this means 5.18 will be updated and maintained by KDE contributors for the next couple of years (regular versions are maintained for 4 months). So, if you are thinking of updating or migrating your school, company or organization to Plasma, this version is your best bet," reads today's announcement.

What's new in KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS

Highlig... (read more)

Kubuntu Focus Linux Laptop Is Now Available for Pre-Order, Ships Early February

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 08:05:00 PM
The previously announced Kubuntu Focus Linux laptop is now available for pre-order and has a shipping date and a price tag for those who want a premium computer.

Unveiled last month during the Christmas holidays, the Kubuntu Focus laptop is a collaboration between Kubuntu, Tuxedo Computers, and MindShareManagement Inc., and it aims to be the first-ever officially recognized Kubuntu Linux laptop targeted mainly at gamers, power users, and developers.

Kubuntu Focus is a premium and very powerful device that comes pre-installed with the latest Kubuntu release, an official Ubuntu flavor featuring the KDE Plasma Desktop environment, some of the most popular Open Source software, and astonishing hardware components.

Today, Kubuntu announced on Twitter that the Kubuntu Focus laptop is now available for pre-order with a price tag starting at $2,395.00 USD for the base model, which features 32GB of RAM, an Nvidia GeForce RTX... (read more)

CentOS Linux 8.1 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 04:34:00 PM
The CentOS community announced today the general availability of the CentOS Linux 8 (1911), based on the source code of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 operating system.

CentOS Linux 8.1 (1911) is here almost four months after the introduction of the CentOS Linux 8 operating system series, which is based on Red Hat's Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 operating system series, to add all the new features and improvements implemented upstream in the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 release.

Highlights include kernel live patching, a new routing protocol stack called FRR which supports multiple IPv4 and IPv6 routing protocols, an extended version of the Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF) to help sysadmins troubleshoot complex network issues, support for re-encrypting block devices in LUKS2 while the devices are in use, as well as a new tool for generating SELinux policies for containers c... (read more)

IPFire Linux Firewall Distribution Improves Its Intrusion Prevention System

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 03:05:00 PM
A new version of IPFire, the only Linux-based and open-source firewall distribution, has seen the light of day to bring more improvements and updated components.

IPFire 2.23 Core Update 139 is the latest release of the Linux-based firewall distribution, featuring an improved Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) that now receives information about which DNS servers are being used by the system, as well as improved booting and reconnect after loss of Internet connection.

With this new Core Update, IPFire 2.23 is also switching to AES-GCM as preferred cipher when establishing an SSL/TLS connection to the firewall and connections to web user interface. Previously, the firewall distribution made use of the AES-CBC and ChaCha20/Poly1305 ciphers.

"Since AESNI is becoming and more and more popular even on smaller hardware, it makes sense to prefer AES," explains developer Michael Tremer. "A vast ... (read more)

Oracle Releases VirtualBox 6.1.2 with Initial Support for Linux Kernel 5.5

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 02:26:00 PM
Oracle has released today the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 6.1 series of its open-source and cross-platform virtualization software for all supported platforms.

VirtualBox 6.1.2 is here to add a month's worth of new bug fixes  and improvements to the popular virtualization software developed by Oracle, adding initial support for the upcoming Linux 5.5 kernel series, which should hit the streets later this month. For now, Guest Additions are not supported.

For the Linux platform, VirtualBox 6.1.2 also improves resize and multi-monitor handling for virtual machines using VMSVGA in Linux guests. However, Oracle notes the fact that the "do not disable a monitor "in the middle"" issue is still present in this release and it causes confusion for users.

For the Windows platform, VirtualBox 6.1.2 re-adds the vbox-img.exe utility in the Windows installer, implements accelerated 2D video decoding when the virtual machine is set to use VBoxSVGA with 3D e... (read more)

Linux Really Shouldn’t Expect an Influx of Windows Users Anytime Soon

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 01:38:00 PM
Windows 7 reaching the end of life is without a doubt a key moment for the OS industry this year. According to third-party data provided by market analysis firm NetMarketShare, Windows 7 accounted for more than 25 percent of the entire PC market in December 2019, which means that 1 in 4 PCs were powered by an operating system whose demise was imminent.

At the same time, these numbers show that 25 percent of the global PC users now have to face a huge dilemma: should we stick with Windows 7, move to Windows 10, or jump ship to Linux or macOS?

There’s no universal answer to this question, and it’s up to each user to decide which way to go. But in the last 24 hours or so, I’ve noticed an overwhelming enthusiasm in the Linux world, as many expect Windows users to migrate en-masse to the open-source world.

Ubuntu, Linux Lite, Linux Mint, and a few other Linux distros have all been specifically optimized to serve as familiar homes for Windows users making the jump to Li... (read more)

Linux Developers Start Poaching Microsoft Users After Windows 7 End of Support

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 10:20:00 AM
Windows 7 has officially reached the end of support, so users running it have three options to choose from: stick with Windows 7 and face the obvious security risks, upgrade to newer Windows, or migrate to a non-Windows platform.

As far as the last option goes, Linux distro makers know how big this opportunity really is, so they started poaching Windows 7 users in an attempt to increase their install base.

After Canonical tried to lure Windows 7 users to install Ubuntu, a number of Korean companies developing their own custom Linux distros have launched similar campaigns specifically supposed to convince Microsoft customers to make the switch.

Tmax, which builds TmaxOS, Hancom, the maker of Gurem, and Invesume, the developing company of open-source OS HamoniKR, are all aiming to convert Windows users to their own platforms.

read more)

Intel Patches Security Vulnerability in Linux and Windows Drivers

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 08:43:00 AM
Intel has published a total of six advisories for security vulnerabilities impacting its products, including the Intel Processor Graphics on Windows and Linux.

Out of the six security flaws, only one comes with a “high” severity rating. Four of them are rated as “medium,” while last one has a “low” rating.

The high-severity vulnerability is an escalation of privilege that exists in the Intel VTune Amplifier for Windows, and Intel says the bug was discovered internally by company employees.

To resolve the flaw, users must update Intel VTune Amplifier for Windows to version 8 or newer.

“Improper access control in driver for Intel VTune Amplifier for Windows before update 8 may allow an authenticated user to potentially enable escalation of privilege via local access,” Intel says.

read more)

Ubuntu's Waiting for You, Canonical Tells Windows 7 Users

Wednesday 15th of January 2020 05:57:00 AM
It goes without saying that the Windows 7 end of support is the perfect moment for everyone to start poaching users, and unsurprisingly, Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, is one of those trying to prove that a switch to its platform is worth the effort.

Rhys Davies, product manager at Canonical, plays the hardware card, explaining that Windows 7 users can either “buy a new computer running another operating” or simply install Ubuntu, which doesn’t require any other hardware upgrades.

Davies goes on to highlight some of the apps that make the transition from Windows 7 to Ubuntu as smoothly as possible, including Google Chrome, Spotify, Blender, and Microsoft’s very own Skype.

“With these apps, most PC users will be able to function as normal. You can continue to search the web, listen to music, watch films, talk with your friends and download new apps,” Davies says.

Linux still ... (read more)

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GameMode 1.5

  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release. GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works? To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care. Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects. In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries. In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments. One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.