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Updated: 2 hours 27 min ago

Planetary Annihilation: TITANS has a big update available with major Linux issues (updated)

Monday 7th of October 2019 10:23:11 AM

Tags: Steam, Humble Store, Indie Game, RTS, Update

Update: They have reverted the Linux version to use Coherent UI 2.5.9.3. This now at least enables it to run with NVIDIA as good as normal. Nice to see a quick fix. Hopefully the next time it will get a little more testing.

Original article:

Planetary Annihilation Inc continue updating and expanding their massive scale RTS Planetary Annihilation: TITANS with a new major update available.

It includes a new unit, the impressive sounding Horsefly:

Found in the Advanced Air Factory and armed with rapid-fire cannons, it strafes targets to remove all the pesky AA (and fabbers) from the vicinity, while tanking return fire with its heavy armour. Conduct your bombing campaigns in peace once more. It will attack the land, it will attack the sea, and in a pinch it can even attack air.

Along with many other unit balance changes, various client and server improvements, AI upgrades and more. They also made a note about how they also have compatibility with Steam Play so AMD GPU users should now get a working UI.

Sadly though, this major update has caused issues for the Linux version. Historically PA has not worked well on an AMD GPU due to their use of the proprietary UI middleware "Coherent UI". This latest update upgraded Coherent UI, which has resulted in the modern Linux build even on an NVIDIA GPU causing a black screen. You can see their fancy cursor but do nothing else. They seem to be aware of the issue, as noted in their "Known Issues" it states "Modern native Linux may segfault in CoherentUI_Host (try Steam Proton)".

You can opt into the legacy build on Steam via the Beta option, but that will only let you play single-player games. I did try out the modern Linux build (the default) in Steam Play as they suggested until it's fixed and to be blunt, it was absolutely atrocious. I've gone from having a native game run super smooth at well over 100FPS to around 30FPS and a UI that lags to the point that it's just not playable. I've got a really strong PC too, can't imagine how bad it will be for others. There's some chat about it on Steam here, not looking good for others either.

As a big fan of Planetary Annihilation: TITANS and someone who supported it since Kickstarter and then later upgraded to a much higher tier this makes me incredibly sad to see. Willingly pushing out an update that breaks it completely on modern Linux distributions isn't really acceptable.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Planetary Annihilation: TITANS has a big update available with major Linux issues

Monday 7th of October 2019 10:23:11 AM

Tags: Steam, Humble Store, Indie Game, RTS, Update

Planetary Annihilation Inc continue updating and expanding their massive scale RTS Planetary Annihilation: TITANS with a new major update available.

It includes a new unit, the impressive sounding Horsefly:

Found in the Advanced Air Factory and armed with rapid-fire cannons, it strafes targets to remove all the pesky AA (and fabbers) from the vicinity, while tanking return fire with its heavy armour. Conduct your bombing campaigns in peace once more. It will attack the land, it will attack the sea, and in a pinch it can even attack air.

Along with many other unit balance changes, various client and server improvements, AI upgrades and more. They also made a note about how they also have compatibility with Steam Play so AMD GPU users should now get a working UI.

Sadly though, this major update has caused issues for the Linux version. Historically PA has not worked well on an AMD GPU due to their use of the proprietary UI middleware "Coherent UI". This latest update upgraded Coherent UI, which has resulted in the modern Linux build even on an NVIDIA GPU causing a black screen. You can see their fancy cursor but do nothing else. They seem to be aware of the issue, as noted in their "Known Issues" it states "Modern native Linux may segfault in CoherentUI_Host (try Steam Proton)".

You can opt into the legacy build on Steam via the Beta option, but that will only let you play single-player games. I did try out the modern Linux build (the default) in Steam Play as they suggested until it's fixed and to be blunt, it was absolutely atrocious. I've gone from having a native game run super smooth at well over 100FPS to around 30FPS and a UI that lags to the point that it's just not playable. I've got a really strong PC too, can't imagine how bad it will be for others. There's some chat about it on Steam here, not looking good for others either.

As a big fan of Planetary Annihilation: TITANS and someone who supported it since Kickstarter and then later upgraded to a much higher tier this makes me incredibly sad to see. Willingly pushing out an update that breaks it completely on modern Linux distributions isn't really acceptable.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Story-driven action RPG 'Children of Morta' is still coming to Linux but no ETA

Monday 7th of October 2019 09:09:51 AM

Tags: Action, RPG, Steam, Upcoming

Children of Morta, a very good looking story-driven action RPG from Dead Mage and 11 bit studios release in early September. It was supposed to have Linux support but they've been pretty quiet on it.

We wrote about this back in June, noting that the developer confirmed a Linux version was still happening. Sadly the release came and went with no word on the Linux version. However, searching around on September 24th they did reply on Steam to say that "We plan to add Linux support, yes. Again, can't promise any dates at the moment.". Today as well, the publisher 11 bit studios did also email GamingOnLinux to confirm this "It's happening, but right now we don't have an exact date of when it will be available.".

Great to know it's happening, shame it seems quite delayed but as always good things seem to come to those who wait as it's being reviewed very well by critics and users. They also announced recently that they've already covered the cost of development within a few days of releasing.

Not seen it? Take a look at the newer trailer below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

Children of Morta is an action RPG with a rogue-lite approach to character development, where you don’t play a single character - but a whole, extraordinary family of heroes. Hack’n’slash through hordes of enemies in procedurally generated dungeons, caves and lands and lead the family of Bergsons, with all their flaws and virtues, against the forthcoming Corruption.

Until the release, you can wishlist and follow it on Humble Store, GOG and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Mixing strategy and RPG elements The Dwarves of Glistenveld is entering Early Access soon

Monday 7th of October 2019 08:46:25 AM

Tags: Strategy, RPG, Indie Game, Upcoming, Early Access, Steam

Dig deep for riches, just not too deep or you might find some Goblins lurking around. The Dwarves of Glistenveld is confirmed to be entering Early Access on October 18th. Linux support is confirmed too, as the developer clearly replied to us on Twitter.

The Dwarves of Glistenveld is a 2.5D Real Time Strategy game with sandbox and RPG elements. Take control of a clan of Dwarves, as they mine, forage, build and fight to retake their homeland from a horde of greedy goblins. Will you unite and cooperate with the other dwarf clans? Or will you take control of a single clan and seek to gain power for yourself?


Watch video on YouTube.com

Looks like it could be quite interesting from the trailer, certainly a slightly unusual style to it. I absolutely love such building games though, so I should be taking a look. It does look quite slow from the movement and animations, so I'm curious to see how it feels when playing.

Feature Highlight:

  • Campaign - Play through a story-driven single-player campaign, as you help the dwarves drive out the goblins and take back their homeland!
  • Personality - Every dwarf is unique, with a trait system and generated details that give each unit individual personalities, appearances and behaviours. Watch as your dwarves gain experience working a particular role and level up to gain new abilities!
  • Scenarios - Experience a series of carefully designed, challenging levels that are not part of the main campaign.
  • Skirmish Mode - Play through an almost infinite number of generated maps as you choose from a wide range of parameters to customize your own scenario.
  • Map Editor - Hand-craft and script your own levels and share them on the Steam Workshop.
  • Mini Games - In our first mini-game, Mobbit Run, you play as a brave mobbit (an underground critter somewhere between a mole and a rabbit) whose goal is to steal carrots from the goblins.

Interested? You can wishlist and follow ready for the release next week on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

FOSS game engine Godot Engine 3.2 Alpha released

Monday 7th of October 2019 08:33:08 AM

Tags: Open Source, Alpha, Game Engine, Update

With months of development behind them, Godot Engine 3.2 hits the first Alpha release with a ton of new and improved features for this FOSS game engine.

They're a bit behind on their schedule for this release, which they said was due to work done on their build infrastructure. Due to this, the Alpha/Beta phases should be quite short as technically it has been in Alpha for a while.

As for what's new, there's quite a lot. Here's some highlights:

  • Support for pseudo-3D depth in 2D.
  • Support for importing 3D scenes using Assimp.
  • Support for generating audio procedurally and analyzing audio spectrums.
  • WebRTC support.
  • Major improvements to the visual shader system.
  • Improved visual scripting.
  • Version control integration in the editor.
  • A Network profiler.
  • Lots of other smaller changes, improvements and bug fixes

See the release announcement here and the current changelog here.

For those waiting on the Vulkan support, that's going to be due in Godot Engine 4.0 due much later.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Throne of Lies ends support for Linux but it could return in future

Sunday 6th of October 2019 07:41:50 PM

Tags: Misc, Steam, Unity

Joining Rust, Natural Selection 2 and Forager this year is Throne of Lies from Imperium42 Game Studio who have decided to end Linux support for their online multiplayer game.

Posted in their Discord today in the Linux channel, which you only see if you've added yourself to a special role, was an announcement about Linux support ending. They've also already removed the SteamOS icon from the Steam store page.

Why? Well, it seems they've been having some issues with hackers recently. They're trying to sort it out but what's not helping is they've been unable to use IL2CPP, a Unity-developed scripting backend, on Mac or Linux:

Hi Penguin friends. We've supported Linux (and Mac) as long as we possibly could, despite the many hurdles (Mac and Linux getting updates/bug fixes/support last, lowest forms of support for dev packages, etc).

Now, we have 2 more major hurdles:

1) The recent hacks
2) I can't build on Linux a special way that keeps most code safe (IL2CPP) and efficient.

Here's the deal

* We have vulnerability fixes for the recent hacks, but not for Linux or Mac.
* We still cannot build in IL2CPP (that special way) on Mac or Linux.

Sadly, Linux support can only be as good as the game engine they build their game with. In this case, their issue is partly similar to what happened with Rust as no IL2CPP support for Linux being one of the reasons. Hopefully the Unity team will be working towards getting that working with Linux so we don't end up seeing more of this for online multiplayer games.

Much like Natural Selection 2, it's a small team struggling to keep a player-base going. It's not exactly a popular game, with it barely able to keep even 100 players online. Given that it needs a minimum of 8 people per game, that's not good. That said, I'm quite sad to see yet another game drop official Linux support.

There's a silver lining though for Linux gamers at least (seems MacOS support will never come back), as the Imperium42 staff member also said:

In the future, I may be able to bring back Linux support (but probably not Mac) since I can emulate Ubuntu significantly easier, but I still lack a build process and Unity doesn't behave well in Linux. I'd like to make a pipeline to upload via my server, but that won't be anytime soon, unfortunately

Hopefully this doesn't end up becoming a trend. Want to make sure it doesn't? Make yourself heard. If you buy a game that supports Linux and you enjoy it: tell friends, tell the developer, write a Steam user review for it and so on. Just don't be silent on it.

Hat tip to Expalphalog.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The Linux and gaming Sunday round-up paper

Sunday 6th of October 2019 03:29:08 PM

Tags: Misc, Round-up

Sunday! It's here again already so let's go over some recent interesting news, some sales and whatever else we may have missed during the week that could be interesting.

First up, we missed the recent small update for the Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 layer for Wine named DXVK. DXVK 1.4.2, was released late Friday with these changes and improvements:

  • Minor reduction of CPU overhead
  • Fixed a minor performance regression introduced in 1.4.1 in GPU-bound scenarios.
  • Fixed a case of incorrect NaN behaviour in shaders.
  • Fixed various minor DXGI issues to improve pass rate in wine tests.
  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered: Report all GPUs as Nvidia to work around game crashes.

D9VK 0.22 was also released recently for running D3D9 games with Vulkan and Wine.

It seems AMD CPU sales are going strong, with them recently hitting an all-time high when it comes to the actual number of CPUs being sold. It's not exactly surprising though, since the latest Ryzen processors offer good performance with a high core count when compared with Intel's often more expensive lineup.

Some sad news this week was HopFrog removing Linux support from the rather sweet game Forager, if you missed it the article was updated to include new info. It's still a little confusing but from what they said it will not be removed, it will see updates but no Linux-specific issues will be fixed. Most of the issues seem to come from Game Maker, which often has pretty iffy Linux support.

The co-op tactical shooter Police Stories was recently released and I gave it a rather positive look. I'm actually looking forward to playing more of this one, as it really does get intense. Especially when you've got one suspect left, a single bullet could end your current mission. It's tough but very fun to play with another person.

Phoronix recently did some testing to compare the classic LLVM compiler back-end against the newer Valve-funded ACO. Looks like ACO holds up well and can give some nice improvements here and there so it's looking quite good for the next big Mesa release with 19.3 coming up towards the end of the year.

More interesting open source projects to keep an eye on:

  • Carnage3D, an attempt to remake Grand Theft Auto 1.
  • OpenSC, bringing classic Starcraft into the OpenRA game engine.

It's wonderful seeing so many open source game engine remakes lately like we've seen with SanAndreasUnity and openblack.

ROCKFISH Games, the developer of the awesome space action roguelike EVERSPACE who are currently crowdfunding EVERSPACE 2 on Kickstarter (will support Linux again) are doubling down on their promise to not go exclusive to the Epic Game Store, as they explained in an update to their previous campaign. This is obviously very good news for us, since Epic Games have no plans for the Epic Gamers Store on Linux. Their crowdfunding campaign for EVERSPACE 2 is going strong hitting well over €120,000 against their €450,000 goal.

MegaSphere, the story-based sci-fi action platformer with a seriously incredible style had a massive update recently. After putting a few more hours in across the week, I'm a little bit in love with it. Such vibrant colours, tough enemies and a very interesting story to follow.

The PSP emulator, PPSSPP, had a big new release lately with version 1.9. Plenty of optimisations were done, multiple games should work better, it now has support for installing texture packs and ISOs from zips and much more.

A bit of fun Valve news for you this week too! After they updated and fixed various issues with Half-Life 2 and the episodes they went back and did the same for Portal 2. For Linux gamers, Portal 2 gained a fix for material rendering which had plagued it for a long time. On top of that it now supports device specific glyphs from Steam Input API to help players using other gamepads like PlayStation and Switch Pro, there's also a few other nice gamepad related fixes and several potential exploits that were reported were solved.

The next massive update for the Zombie survival game 7 Days to Die is coming up! The developer has announced an "experimental" build to be up tomorrow. You can see some of what's coming on their release notes. Our livestreamer, Sin, is a massive fan and has shown it off a lot and hopefully will be jumping in again when that build is up. Be sure to follow GamingOnLinux on Twitch to see.

 

Weekend deals reminder:

 

Apologies again for the News Punch roundup podcast not coming back. It's been a mixture of things between multiple microphones dying on me and my voice vanishing. My voice is really coming back now and so the podcast shall return again soon!

If you enjoy what we do here you can support us through places like Patreon, Paypal, Liberapay, Flattr and Twitch. In addition our our affiliate links with GOG and Humble Store (which really do help!).

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

A little look over ProtonDB reports for Steam Play in September 2019

Friday 4th of October 2019 08:35:52 PM

Tags: Steam Play

ProtonDB have released another of their monthly data dumps of user reports for Steam Play, so let's take a look over what happened during September.

Looking to get started with Steam Play on Linux? Be sure to check our previous beginners guide.

Like our look over the data for August, we're going to continue this method of looking over the top twenty titles being most reported through September. This is basically the list of what games were the most popular in terms of users testing and reporting how they work with Steam Play. If they have a number of Platinum and Gold ratings, they probably work quite well. Sorted by total number of ratings, while also showing how many were Platinum or Gold to give you a good idea how they run overall.

Name No. Total Plat Gold Grand Theft Auto V 76 16 18 Cube World 42 19 2 Spyro Reignited Trilogy 33 9 10 Warframe 28 5 12 Noita 28 20 0 I Love You, Colonel Sanders! A Finger Lickin’ Good Dating Simulator 27 0 6 The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt 25 19 4 GreedFall 24 0 12 Blasphemous 24 0 10 CODE VEIN 21 12 3 No Man's Sky 20 11 4 Fallout 4 20 3 8 HITMAN 2 18 7 5 Children of Morta 17 2 10 MONSTER HUNTER: WORLD 17 1 9 Path of Exile 16 7 6 DOOM 15 11 2 World of Warships 13 3 1 Divinity: Original Sin 2 - Definitive Edition 13 0 11 FINAL FANTASY VIII - REMASTERED 13 8 2

Noita is an interesting new arrival in the list there that seems quite popular from Nolla Games. A magical action roguelite set in a world where every pixel is physically simulated. Going by the reports it certainly seems like Linux gamers are having a good time with it thanks to Steam Play. Here's a video of Noita running on Manjaro Linux (key provided by the developer):


Watch video on YouTube.com

Be gentle, it was my third time…and everything scared me.

Back to the September info dump now. Let's take a look at what games were first reported during September, sorted by the amount of reports of them being broken. These are titles were Steam Play is either not working or has too many issues to be playable on Linux.

Name Borked (broken) I Love You, Colonel Sanders! A Finger Lickin’ Good Dating Simulator 20 GreedFall 8 Gears 5 5 Solasta: Crown of the Magister 4 Planet Zoo 4 PlanetSide Arena 4 AI: The Somnium Files 4 CODE VEIN 4 Spyro Reignited Trilogy 4 Cube World 4

Back onto the positive side of things again!

Let's take a look at games being first reported during September that actually did get some good (Gold+) reports showing they should work with Steam Play on Linux shall we?

Name Total good Cube World 21 Noita 20 Spyro Reignited Trilogy 19 CODE VEIN 15 GreedFall 12 FINAL FANTASY VIII - REMASTERED 10 Session: Skateboarding Sim Game 7 I Love You, Colonel Sanders! A Finger Lickin’ Good Dating Simulator 6 The Surge 2 6 Crying Suns 6 AI: The Somnium Files 3 METAL SLUG XX 3 The Lord of the Rings: Adventure Card Game 3 Calvino Noir 3 G2 Fighter / 基因特工 3

As always, you should take ProtonDB ratings with a pinch of salt. It's an unofficial website, although there's currently nothing better available. As we can see some games end up with reports mixed between broken and playable. Much like native Linux games it can depend on a lot of factors including GPU, drivers and more. This monthly overview is just to give you a little slice of what people have been testing out and having some luck with.

Just a reminder that some browser plugins are available to help view ratings on the Steam store. For Firefox you can use the plugin ProtonDB for Steam which adds the rating to store pages. Additionally, there's also the Augmented Steam plugin for Firefox and Chrome which adds a handy link to the ProtonDB entry but it doesn't show ratings yet.

Are you enjoying Steam Play? What have you been testing on Linux? Open up in the comments, maybe help someone find their next game to enjoy.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Keep an eye on 'Veloren', an open source multiplayer voxel RPG written in Rust

Friday 4th of October 2019 02:41:11 PM

Tags: RPG, Open Source, Alpha

Move over Cube World, there's a new open source voxel RPG in town under development called Veloren and it supports Linux too so there's a bonus point for you.

Inspired by many games like Cube World, Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Dwarf Fortress and Minecraft it's currently under heavy development, thanks to user email tips I've been keeping a close eye on this one. I don't want to get your hopes up too high but it's already coming along well and shows a ridiculous amount of promise.

Their regular progress reports on the official site blog have been a thoroughly interesting read. So many interesting features and world generation updates coming along for it. You can see some gameplay in their recent raw video below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

As you can see, it's a little rough around the edges in many ways but already pretty playable. Once there's a bit more to do, it could be good for a few hours of exploration.

You can find downloads and more info on the official site and the GitLab. Their "Nightly" release is the recommended one to use, even though it's not a proper release it's far more up to date.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Lose your soul in the creepy adventure game Demons Never Lie, now with a Linux demo

Friday 4th of October 2019 01:24:02 PM

Tags: Demo, Indie Game, Adventure, Steam, Upcoming, Unity

Releasing sometime around Halloween this year, the quite creepy adventure game Demons Never Lie now has a Linux demo available to try out on Steam.

After an awful life, John's soul is ready to say goodbye to this cruel world. In that moment, a demon called Ocaso, appears in front of him. The mysterious creature offers John the opportunity of being young again, having the life he's always dreamed of. In exchange of his soul, of course. Will John accept his offer? And, if so, what will be the consequences?

Currently in development by Maika Hernández, a solo developer from Spain going under the name of IndieBug. This low-poly blocky voxel-styled adventure was funded on Kickstarter back in June with a small budget thanks to generous users. After playing a bit, I was quite impressed. Great atmosphere with a story that makes you want to know more and see what really happens to John.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • Play as John, help him to fix his life, avoiding terrible past mistakes... with a demon on your side.
  • This game is being developed in Unity by only ONE person so your support is very important.
  • 3D graphic adventure with classic point&click and visual novel elements.
  • Indie game with charismatic voxel characters and beautiful low-poly sceneries.
  • Emotional and atmospheric storytelling. Sometimes bright, sometimes dark. Just like real life.
  • You can make a pact with the devil. What else could be better than that?

If you wish to try the demo, it needs a quick fix. Currently Steam is setup to look for the wrong filename. Open up where you install it and rename the folder to "DNLDemo_Data" and the executable to "DNLDemo.x86" and it will then run fine. I've made the developer aware of this small error.

Find the demo on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Second Earth, the currently free base building strategy game from Free Lives had a huge upgrade

Friday 4th of October 2019 12:35:55 PM

Tags: Strategy, RTS, Itch.io, Free Game, Alpha

Somewhat inspired by the satire of Starship Troopers, Second Earth is the current free prototype base building strategy game from Free Lives (developer of Broforce).

It's a mixture of a real-time strategy game about building up a strong economy, with a tower defence like wrapping. Each map requires you to build up a strong base and then defeat waves of alien bugs. Build walls to keep you civilians safe, build weapon towers to squish all the bugs and service guarantees citizenship.

Written about a few times here already as it's quite impressive, Free Lives just released a massive update to the game. Here's some highlights on what's new:

  • New bugs - Two new bugs have been added and all of the enemy art has been remade from scratch. 
  • UI overhaul - The UI has been completely redesigned, polished and expanded.
  • Tutorials - The first two missions of the game now feature more fleshed out tutorial systems.
  • World map - A world map with a meta-game has been added. It's fairly bare-bones right now, but we have big plans!
  • Worker population system - Buildings now require workers to operate. Workers will move into houses if you meet their needs.
  • Pausing - The game no longer pauses after each wave. You can instead pause whenever you like, as long as there is not a wave currently attacking.
  • New auto-construction system - The way you build farms, houses and mines has been streamlined (and hopefully made more interesting).

The changes are interesting, especially the construction system changes. You no longer have to micro-manage building the plots for farms and mines. Instead, when putting one down it will capture an area to do it for you. It's a little better, more streamlined and the new UI that comes with it looks a lot better too.

One issue in the current Linux build, is that the new intro video is blank. The developer needs to use an open video format that Unity supports like webm. They've been notified of this, it's a really small issue so hopefully the next build will have it fixed. If you see the black screen, just hit ESC and it will thankfully skip it as they're sane enough to not force you to watch it.

If you do enjoy it on Linux, be sure to let the developer know. Once they get it to a stage where it will be a full release, I hope to see good continued Linux support with it as I've really enjoyed the last few builds.

Find it currently free on itch.io.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

In the multiplayer action game Foreskin Fury you get to hop around as a big wobbly penis

Friday 4th of October 2019 10:36:18 AM

Tags: Action, Indie Game, Steam, Early Access, Upcoming

Well that's a title I didn't think I would be writing. It's a real thing though, Foreskin Fury is due to enter Early Access on Steam sometime this "Fall".

A game full of obviously crude humour, with a bunch of dicks fighting to the death to become the "ultimate swaffle master". Believe me, I'm not keeping a straight face typing out all this. Sometimes we do have to walk on the silly side of life. Now check out the trailer and tell me you didn't cringe and laugh all at once:


Watch video on YouTube.com

I will fully and openly admit the end of the trailer with it running along made me spit out my drink. That very much brightened my day right up.

Feature Highlight:

  • Unique combat system - Build up your manhood and use it to trigger your special abilities. Be smart and use them carefully to become the undisputed champion of the arena
  • Dynamic and ruthless environments - To master the art of the Fury, you will need to understand and use your surroundings. Bounce over your enemies, sneak behind their backs, spit and transform the terrain or become a dangerous striking shadow.
  • Personalized character - Fury is nothing without style. As you move around, you'll find items to personalize and decorate your character. Your penis will quickly become a dangerous and stylish weapon, famous and feared in the cruel world of Foreskin Fury.

This certainly isn't a new concept though, with Genital Jousting releasing (with no Linux support) from a different developer last year. At least with Foreskin Fury we will see a Linux version as the system requirements are up stating it will work on any "modern linux distro". Not just that, they put out a post on Twitter about testing cross-platform play between Windows and Linux too so it's good to see some thorough testing being done.

You can follow it on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Train Valley 2 - Passenger Flow brings the mechanics from the original into the sequel

Friday 4th of October 2019 10:07:30 AM

Tags: DLC, New Release, Strategy, Steam, GOG, Indie Game

If you preferred the gameplay mechanics of the original Train Valley, you should take a look at the Train Valley 2 - Passenger Flow DLC that's out now.

In the original game, you simply had to get passengers of a certain colour code into the correct station. Train Valley 2 changed all that into a more puzzle micro-management feel with different resources and a production chain. The first DLC for Train Valley 2, Passenger Flow, is out now and brings back the original mechanic into the updated game along with new levels and locomotives for you to play around with.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • Experience a new layer of depth and variety brought by the Passenger Flow mechanic.
  • Challenge yourself with 20 brand new levels in company mode.
  • Collect 6 new unlockable locomotives.
  • Enjoy 5 new sound themes.
  • Experiment with tons of new content in the Level Editor.

You can find Train Valley 2 and this new DLC on both GOG and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The handy Steering Wheel Manager 'Oversteer' has a new release out

Friday 4th of October 2019 09:36:13 AM

Tags: Apps, Open Source

For those of you with a Steering Wheel and play plenty of racing games on Linux, Oversteer is one of those essential and very handy tools.

The developer continues to update it, with a fresh release now available. The first new addition in this release is the ability to adjust auto centring strength, which makes your Wheel want to constantly go back to the centre. The developer said they added it as games without force feedback can be "more pleasant to play" with it. Testing it myself, it does work nicely and it's a really sweet option to have.

For games that don't let you adjust the force feedback strength, there's now a gain setting for this too.

As a reminder it should be compatible with Driving Force / Formula EX, Driving Force Pro, Driving Force GT, Momo Force, Momo Racing Force, Speed Force Wireless, G25 Racing Wheel, G27 Racing Wheel, G29 Driving Force Racing Wheel and the G920 Driving Force Racing Wheel.

Oversteer works beautifully with my G29, it's become my absolute go-to application for when I want to tweak a bunch of Wheel settings on Linux.

Find Oversteer on GitHub.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Mountain biking game Lonely Mountains: Downhill to release on October 23rd

Friday 4th of October 2019 09:14:53 AM

Tags: Sports, Upcoming, Steam, Racing

Megagon Industries and Thunderful Publishing have announced their rather thrilling looking mountain biking game Lonely Mountains: Downhill is releasing this month on October 23rd.

From the press release:

“We’re super excited to finally have the finish line in sight. Thanks to all our Kickstarter backers for their patience and for staying with us on the ride. We’re really looking forward to see if our leaderboard times can last longer than a day.” says Daniel Helbig, co-founder and one of the three devs from Megagon Industries.

They're also now announcing Lonely Mountains: Downhill will feature a Night Mode, to make it even more challenging and you can see a bunch of the game in the new release trailer below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

While the Steam store page doesn't currently list Linux support, the game was crowdfunded on Kickstarter which has Linux as a release platform. I spoke with the publisher, Thunderful Publishing, only this morning and they told me very clearly "Hi! The game is compatible with Linux on the launch!" so I've mentioned about updating the Steam page to reflect this.

However, when looking around and what the publisher did not say is it seems the developer might be in fact looking into Steam Play. Since they don't seem to be mentioning Linux anywhere, a backer asked about it and they replied with:

Hey, no, we haven't forgotten but when we started the Kickstarter there was no way to play Steam games on Linux. Nowadays it works out of the box as far as we know and people tested that in the closed-beta. So we just wonder if we should still do a Linux version if it just works with Steam? What do you think?

If you say you're going to support Linux and do a Kickstarter with Linux as a platform, you go through on your promise. I hope they will actually do what they said and not rely on Valve and CodeWeavers doing it for them with Steam Play. I've asked the developer today to provide a clear statement of their plans and will update when they let us know.

I've also requested a key from the publisher to take a look around the release.

With the release on October 23rd, they said it will be priced around €19.99 / $19.99 / £17.99 which may vary across regions and stores but should be close to that.

You can find it on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

HopFrog is removing Linux support from Forager and MacOS is not coming now either (updated)

Friday 4th of October 2019 08:54:25 AM

Tags: Editorial, Misc, Game Maker

Update: Mentions of a Linux version have now been removed from the Steam store. According to the developer, they will not remove the Linux version and people on Linux did buy a "completed game" but it won't see any more support going forward (source). They also said the Linux version will see updates "but Linux specific bugs won't be addressed" however "gameplay balance, graphical bugs, most game crashes, etc will be fixed regardless of what your OS is" (source).

How about a kick in the teeth with your coffee this Friday morning? Well, that's what I've got for you. Developer HopFrog has announced they will be removing Linux support for Forager and Mac is no longer coming. Forager only released in April this year too.

Buried in their Q&A post on Steam was this:

Unfortunately, both Linux and Mac have proven very difficult for us to work with. Forager will no longer be available for Mac and Linux moving forward. Any plans to bring the game to Mac have now officially been canceled. This is a very difficult choice I had to make, and if you are interested in knowing why I and hundreds of other game developers are ditching Mac/Linux, take a look at this article!

I'm particularly annoyed about this one, since I consider it to be a fantastic game and gave it a very positive look. Not just that but to announce it in such an almost casual way, feels pretty uncaring about all the people that have already purchased and played it on Linux.

To get into what they linked to, it's an article talking about problems with supporting Mac due to a bunch of changes Apple are doing. It doesn't really touch on Linux and HopFrog bundling Linux into this feels quite wrong because no, hundreds of game developers are not ditching Linux that's just false.

What the linked article shows is an image from the developer Robotality for their 2014 strategy game Halfway, showing Linux at 2% sales/Mac at 4% with support requests for Linux at 30%/Mac at 50%. Sales around that mark for Linux are quite normal, any developer expecting more must have done no research. I would like to point out that Robotality themselves do continue to support Linux, with Pathway releasing in April this year.

Now onto the support requests bit. Looking over the Forager forum, the main issues on Linux seem to be the game running too fast and no gamepad support. The first issue was already solved and was a problem in Game Maker, the second is another Game Maker engine problem as YoYo Games seem to be reinventing the wheel rather than just using something like SDL 2 to get awesome gamepad support (and lots of other things not just for Linux). If you release a game on a platform that has two issues you would see if you booted it up even once, you're clearly not testing.

I've reached out to HopFrog to ask about their plans for refunds since it was not mentioned.

Additionally, I've reached out to Valve to see what they have to say about this repeating situation since that's Rust, Natural Selection 2 and now Forager that have all decided to dump Linux support after release. Not a lot of course but even one removing support is not a good look and doesn't look great on Valve either if they do nothing to help their customers out. You can argue "Steam Play" but to go over my previous point on this, the question of actual support arises once again there too and people purchased this on Linux because the developer supported the platform.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

HopFrog is removing Linux support from Forager and MacOS is not coming now either

Friday 4th of October 2019 08:54:25 AM

Tags: Editorial, Misc, Game Maker

How about a kick in the teeth with your coffee this Friday morning? Well, that's what I've got for you. Developer HopFrog has announced they will be removing Linux support for Forager and Mac is no longer coming. Forager only released in April this year too.

Buried in their Q&A post on Steam was this:

Unfortunately, both Linux and Mac have proven very difficult for us to work with. Forager will no longer be available for Mac and Linux moving forward. Any plans to bring the game to Mac have now officially been canceled. This is a very difficult choice I had to make, and if you are interested in knowing why I and hundreds of other game developers are ditching Mac/Linux, take a look at this article!

I'm particularly annoyed about this one, since I consider it to be a fantastic game and gave it a very positive look. Not just that but to announce it in such an almost casual way, feels pretty uncaring about all the people that have already purchased and played it on Linux.

To get into what they linked to, it's an article talking about problems with supporting Mac due to a bunch of changes Apple are doing. It doesn't really touch on Linux and HopFrog bundling Linux into this feels quite wrong because no, hundreds of game developers are not ditching Linux that's just false.

What the linked article shows is an image from the developer Robotality for their 2014 strategy game Halfway, showing Linux at 2% sales/Mac at 4% with support requests for Linux at 30%/Mac at 50%. Sales around that mark for Linux are quite normal, any developer expecting more must have done no research. I would like to point out that Robotality themselves do continue to support Linux, with Pathway releasing in April this year.

Now onto the support requests bit. Looking over the Forager forum, the main issues on Linux seem to be the game running too fast and no gamepad support. The first issue was already solved and was a problem in Game Maker, the second is another Game Maker engine problem as YoYo Games seem to be reinventing the wheel rather than just using something like SDL 2 to get awesome gamepad support (and lots of other things not just for Linux). If you release a game on a platform that has two issues you would see if you booted it up even once, you're clearly not testing.

I've reached out to HopFrog to ask about their plans for refunds since it was not mentioned.

Additionally, I've reached out to Valve to see what they have to say about this repeating situation since that's Rust, Natural Selection 2 and now Forager that have all decided to dump Linux support after release. Not a lot of course but even one removing support is not a good look and doesn't look great on Valve either if they do nothing to help their customers out. You can argue "Steam Play" but to go over my previous point on this, the question of actual support arises once again there too and people purchased this on Linux because the developer supported the platform.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Some thoughts on Police Stories, the recently released slower tactical top-down shooter

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 07:28:54 PM

Tags: Top-down shooter, Twin-stick shooter, Steam, Action, Review, Pixel Graphics

Released earlier this month, Police Stories attempts to slow down the top-down shooter genre with a more tactical approach and most of the time it works quite well.

The story here revolves around two cops, John Rimes and Rick Jones. Two old friends joined together as partners when you move to the city. Starting off from a simple call to action while on duty, things quickly spiral as you uncover links leading to something much bigger than expected.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Firstly, trying it out on a gamepad was not a good experience, I gave up with that pretty quickly. Some top-down shooters work well and other times like with Police Stories it just felt terrible. Mainly due to the serious accuracy and reaction times needed, a smooth control of a mouse is basically essential here. Even with a mouse in hand, it's still a thorough challenge. I've been shot dead and seen my partner take a few bullets more times here in the early game than probably any other similar shooter. I'm bad at games, that's nothing new but this was a challenge of a different sort. Having to hold myself back and not fire first, it's strange and yet good to see at the same time.

What makes the difficulty somewhat higher, is the random locations you find people in. Each time you restart, they're somewhere else. This randomness sometimes makes it infuriatingly difficult, like when you get someone to give up and run over to cuff them but another suspect has run up to the wall on the corner, as you approach you're shot dead—damn!  That's not all that's hard though, the normal mode enemy AI has pinpoint accuracy and a ridiculously fast reaction time. I'm sure their bullets are stronger than mine too…

This is why a good partner is key, if you're alone you need to be sure you constantly give your AI companion orders. Get them to watch your back, you're going to need it unless you have a taste for pain and level restarts.

Thankfully, there's a less challenging story mode which some of you might prefer to still get your monies worth and enjoy a little real-time tactical action.

It doesn't help that the co-op partner AI is—crap. I'm being pretty kind about this, it's terrible. I've seen my AI partner go right up to an enemy, standing practically on top of them and somehow fire over their head, giving the enemy suspect a chance to pull out a gun and get an instant kill on my partner. For a game that's forced co-op, the AI is just far too lacking. Trying to get them to throw a stun grenade into a room seems almost impossible too, they just end up flashing me. The saving grace here is that local co-op works perfectly, with either both on gamepads or mixing one on keyboard and mouse and the other with a gamepad. Shouting orders at each other—"ROOM CLEAR", "COVER ME" and so on it's quite an experience.


Pictured: Police Stories in local co-op on Linux.

Playing with the AI partner is still perfectly doable (and still fun enough), they just need to give them some actual behaviours rather than making them into some sort of static robot that they pretty much are now.

The mission structure never really changes. Go through a building and go door to door, dealing with whoever is around through whatever lawful means you can. If they have a weapon ready, they're quite likely going to shoot you most of the time unless you manage to get the drop on them quickly and smartly. You can only see what's around in front of you though with cone-shaped vision. Sometimes enemy suspects will come around the back of you, so keeping an ear out and getting a partner to watch a door as you pass is always a good idea.

Mission areas are small too. Even so, the style and action keep it as a very tense experience. You never truly know how the NPC enemies are going to react but there's signs you learn to watch out for. Sometimes they might seem to give up but pull out a gun if you take too long, otherwise they may run away and hide and then pull out a gun while others might just give up at the first sign of trouble (or a few well placed shots near them).

One thing they do need to solve is how you sometimes end up seeing people through a fully closed door, they just sort of phase through it even though they're still in the other room. I assume it's a bug, as there's no way I should be able to entirely see a person and their weapon, when a door is closed. That was quite annoying and did happen numerous times and ends up defeating the tactical part since you then know what you're dealing with on the other side. Another was more serious, I stood outside a door and I can only describe what happened next like it was something out of a comedy sketch. I open the door, tell them to drop their weapons and they instantly close the door. This went on for a minute or two until the suspect somehow warped outside the room directly next to me and shot me dead.

As you can see in the image above, it has some fun nods to other creative works too like with the DeLorean time machine and there's also a suspiciously Counter-Strike looking bomb site in the same level. It was a little odd, amusing though.

Part of what makes it interesting enough to replay is not just the randomness of it it's also the scoring system. Doing things by the book gets you more points, so you can keep trying to beat your score and get a better time while honing your skills. Each mission needs a certain amount of points to unlock too, so sometimes you actually need to do well in a mission to progress. I'm a little torn on that side of it personally, completing a mission to unlock the next is pretty normal but forcing people to up their score to get the next one feels too limiting especially if you're struggling. I can't be that bad though, I never had to replay a mission for more points so that's something.

While the current content is seemingly quite short when looking at the level count, it does however still take a while to get through. The first four levels took me a good two hours before I really got into the swing of it. Once you get going though, it feels awesome. Tactically lock-picking a door, then hitting it open and throwing in a stun grenade and then order in your partner so they die first—not much else like it.

Just recently they added in online co-op (which has been suffering major problems) with a promise of more to come. These include a custom mission mode, along with a level editor and additional extras like new equipment, suspect types and levels too. I'm happy to see that, as I would like to play with more so I will check it all out when it's available.

Overall, I had a huge amount of fun with it. The partner AI issues are seriously annoying and do need big improvements but it's still enough fun to make it worth playing. When another real person is controlling your partner, it's much better and incredibly fun. Trying out a different approach each time, choosing different equipment and the completely different pace to other shooters makes it very entertaining. A solid co-op experience that's worth picking up.

You can grab it from Humble Store and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Total War: WARHAMMER II - The Hunter & The Beast is now on Linux, plus The Empire Undivided update

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 06:35:06 PM

Tags: DLC, Feral Interactive, New Release, Update

Feral Interactive have updated their port of Total War: WARHAMMER II for Linux to bring The Empire Undivided update and The Hunter & The Beast DLC is now supported.

The Empire Undivided free content update is huge, so big it has a long dedicated post to it on the Total War blog. There's masses of bug fixes and overall balance improvements but also some huge feature adjustments too. The biggest changes looks like it happened for the Mortal Empires Campaign, which is what you get free if you own both Total War: WARHAMMER and Total War: WARHAMMER II. A big territory rework with 12 new regions, huge forts to battle through and empire factions now have access to the reworked Empire tech tree. The Empire Offices system was thrown out too, replaced with a new authority system. There's a huge amount more to it, so do take a read if you're interested in the full details.

On top of that, Total War: WARHAMMER II - The Hunter & The Beast paid DLC is also now available for the Linux version.

The Hunter & The Beast DLC adds in:

  • Two richly themed new Legendary Lords lead their own factions: Markus Wulfhart leads the Huntsmarshal’s Expedition (Empire), and Nakai The Wanderer leads the Spirit of the Jungle
  • Each Legendary Lord brings their own unique faction mechanics, quest-chains, legendary items, skill-trees and campaign narrative
  • Devastating new ranged units, mobile gunpowder batteries and fabled Hunter Heroes for the Huntsmarshal’s Expedition
  • Towering new Dread Saurians, the largest beasts to walk the world of Total War: WARHAMMER, plus new Kroxigors, Razordons and Rites for Spirit of the Jungle
  • New Regiments of Renown to unlock, recruit and field

That's not all, the Total War: WARHAMMER II - Gor-Rok DLC is also now supported in the Linux version. This is a free DLC launched on September 11 that adds in the Great White Lizard "Gor-Rok", a powerful defensive warrior who has a number of unique skills granting him a range of bonuses including Perfect Vigour, Physical Resistance, Terror and Regeneration.

Finally, Feral say the latest updates fix an issue preventing certain mods running like Grimhammer II as well as a "number of minor issues".

You can pick up Total War: WARHAMMER II plus DLC on the Humble Store, Feral Store and Steam.

On a somewhat related note, if you missed it Total War Saga: TROY was also recently announced by Creative Assembly and SEGA with Feral Interactive confirming a Linux port will also be coming.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

DUSK with an exclusive map and Chasm come to GOG during their big 11th anniversary celebration

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 01:45:58 PM

Tags: GOG, Game Sale, DRM-Free

GOG has been going for just about 11 years now, so they're having a big sale to celebrate. On top of that the retro FPS DUSK is now on GOG with an exclusive GOGATORIUM map for the endless mode and also CHASM is now on GOG too.

Blimey, that's quite a bit of news to fit. Let's start with the new DRM-free releases.

DUSK, the retro shooter from David Szymanski and New Blood Interactive (that's really good) featuring a soundtrack by metal music mastermind Andrew Hulshult is now available on GOG with the Linux version available right away. It also had cross-play multiplayer! Here's the kicker though for the GOG release they've gained an exclusive map, THE GOGATORIUM, for the endless mode.

A shot of the GOG exclusive map when trying it earlier.

Nice to see it arrive on GOG, hopefully more of you can now enjoy this shooter!

Find DUSK on GOG now.

The next new release for GOG today is the procedurally-generated adventure-platformer Chasm. It's received quite a few updates since the original release to add in new game modes, more variation in the areas you explore, new graphics and so on. It's certainly gotten a lot more fun to play in my opinion.

Find Chasm on GOG now.

Last but not least, GOG themselves are celebrating being online and serving customers for 11 years now. Originally launching back in 2008 as Good Old Games with a main purpose of providing a good legal place to buy classic games. It later relaunched as GOG in 2012 with an expanded aim to cover bigger and newer games instead of just the classics. They eventually added Linux games to their store too back in 2014 and the rest is history as they say.

For the occasion, GOG are doing a big sale on various titles across their digital shelves. With a list of favourites titles pulled from their staff, you can see the titles on sale here. A couple quality Linux games are included too like:

I'm glad GOG exist, even if their focus isn't entirely older games they do still revive some classics quite often. We have tons of new games coming out all the time, enough to play for the rest of our lives but some classic titles need a home and to not be forgotten about. Still, I do hope that they eventually bring GOG Galaxy to Linux.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

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