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Updated: 6 hours 37 min ago

Octa-core MediaTek i700 SoC offers APU 2.0 for edge AI

Monday 15th of July 2019 05:02:32 PM
MediaTek unveiled an “AI IoT platform i700” SoC for edge AI with 2x 2.2GHz Cortex-A75 cores and 6x 2.0GHz -A55 cores plus a PowerVR GM9446, a 970MHz ISP, and a MediaTek APU 2.0 for AI acceleration. MediaTek recently announced a powerful octa-core Arm that is intended not for smartphones but for edge AI systems. The […]

Quad-camera rig taps into Jetson AGX Xavier for deep learning

Monday 15th of July 2019 04:01:08 PM
E-con has launched a Linux-driven, AI-enabled “SurveilsQUAD” camera system for the Nvidia Jetson AGX Xavier or TX2 with 4x 2-megapixel cameras with HD or FHD resolution connected via MIPI-CSI-2. E-con Systems has begun shipping a SurveilsQUAD (e-CAM20_CUXVR) camera system with a V4L2 Linux driver and a sample Linux app with source. Like the robotics focused […]

NXP unveils Cortex-A35 based i.MX8 variant for Azure Sphere

Friday 12th of July 2019 10:26:44 PM
NXP has announced an upcoming Cortex-A35 based i.MX8 SoC designed to run the Linux-based Azure Sphere stack. The MCU- and DSP-equipped SoC will offer reduced power consumption thanks to FD-SOI technology. As we were reporting on the newly shipping i.MX7 ULP — a version of the i.MX7 that further reduces power consumption thanks to FD-SOI […]

Ultra low-power i.MX7 ULP SoC ships on NXP EVK and two compute modules

Friday 12th of July 2019 09:05:02 PM
NXP’s 28nm, FD-SOI fabbed i.MX7 ULP SoC has arrived along with a Linux-powered eval board. The power-sipping SoC is also being showcased in F&S’ PicoCore MX7ULP and SoMLabs’ ActionSOM-7ULP modules. In June, NXP began volume shipments of its super power-efficient i.MX7 ULP, which it announced in 2017. The SoC is billed as the most power-efficient […]

Bay Trail mini-PC supports extended temperatures

Thursday 11th of July 2019 01:54:46 PM
WinSystems’ Linux-friendly “SYS-ITX-N-3800” is an Intel Bay Trail based industrial mini-PC with dual GbE ports, SATA, DP, USB 3.0, mini-PCIe, and -25 to 60°C support. WinSystems has launched a fanless, Nano-ITX form-factor industrial computer that runs Linux, Windows 10, or Windows 10 IoT on Intel’s dual-core, 1.75GHz Atom E3827 or quad-core, 1.91GHz Atom E3845 Bay […]

Arm-based SBC has PoE, WiFi/BT, and optional Sub-1GHz, 802.15.4, GPS, and LTE

Wednesday 10th of July 2019 08:30:26 PM
Gateworks’ headless “Ventana GW5910” SBC runs OpenWrt or Ubuntu on a dual-core i.MX6 and provides GbE with PoE, WiFi/BT, optional GPS, Sub-1GHz, and 2.4GHz radios, and dual mini-PCIe slots for further wireless expansion. Freescale’s i.MX6 was ahead of its time when it launched in 2011, and in the NXP era it it has continued to […]

Raspberry Pi 4-based Pi-top mini-PC debuts at $199

Wednesday 10th of July 2019 04:57:51 PM
The Raspberry Pi 4-based Pi-top[4] mini-PC has surpassed its Kickstarter goal, starting at $199. The gizmo has an OLED display, 5-hour battery, fan, and 14 sensor modules plus options including screen/KB and robotics kits. The Pi-top [4] mini-PC and hacker kit was announced a few weeks back in conjunction with the Raspberry Pi 4 Model […]

Tiny compute modules crank up Snapdragon 845 and Snapdragon 660

Tuesday 9th of July 2019 05:38:02 PM
Inforce announced two Micro SoMs with Android (and soon, Debian) BSPs running on octa-core Qualcomm SoCs. The Inforce 6701 showcases the high-end Snapdragon 845 while the Inforce 6502 taps the Snapdragon 660. Inforce Computing unveiled a pair of Qualcomm Snapdragon based compute modules using the same 50 x 28mm Micro SoM form factor used in […]

Apollo Lake SMARC module has dual GbE and soldered LPDDR4

Monday 8th of July 2019 07:53:12 PM
Kontron’s Linux-friendly “SMARC-sXAL4” module is equipped with an Apollo Lake SoC, up to 8GB soldered LPDDR4, 2x GbE controllers, triple display support, and an optional industrial range. Kontron has announced a SMARC 2.0 module with a choice of all five of Intel’s Apollo Lake SoCs. The SMARC-sXAL4 updates Kontron’s similarly Apollo Lake based SMARC-sXAL module […]

Cluster platform supports seven Raspberry Pi Compute Modules

Monday 8th of July 2019 04:47:27 PM
A $128, Mini-ITX based “Turing Pi Clusterboard” lets you combine 7x GbE-connected Raspberry Pi Compute Modules for private cloud applications. Meanwhile, Pimoroni has launched a $49 RPi Cluster HAT v2.3 that supports 4x RPi Zeros. Cluster products that combine the computing power of multiple Raspberry Pi boards have long been popular for running a wide […]

Low profile SDM signage board features Whiskey Lake-U

Friday 5th of July 2019 08:01:34 PM
Axiomtek has launched an SDM form-factor “SDM500L” signage board with an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U processor with triple 4K display support, up to 32GB RAM, 3x M.2 sockets, and extended temperature support. Like the 6th Gen Skylake-based Nexcom NDiS S538 that we covered earlier this week, Axiomtek’s new SDM500L signage computer conforms to Intel’s Smart […]

15-inch HD touch-panel runs on hexa-core Arm SoC

Wednesday 3rd of July 2019 06:51:27 PM
Winmate’s IP65-protected “R15RK3S-PTC3” is a 15-inch HD touch-panel with capacitive touch that runs Android 7.1 on a hexa-core Cortex-A72 and -A53 Arm SoC and offers a GbE port with PoE. Winmate has posted a product page for a “new” 15-inch, HD touch-panel system for industrial and enterprise use. The R15RK3S-PTC product name and the specs […]

3D gesture HAT uses Microchip E-field technology

Wednesday 3rd of July 2019 03:29:42 PM
Seeed has released a $12.90 “3D Gesture & Tracking Shield” for the Raspberry Pi that uses Microchip’s electrical near-field sensing technology for touchpad input and 3D gesture tracking at up to 10 cm. Seeed has launched a 3D gesture and tracking add-on board for the Raspberry Pi based on Microchip’s MGC3130 controller and GestIC Colibri […]

Skylake signage computer adopts sleek SDM form factor

Tuesday 2nd of July 2019 07:34:01 PM
Nexcom’s Linux-ready, SDM form-factor “NDiS S538” signage player supports triple independent 4K2K displays. The 6th Gen Intel-based system has dual M.2 slots and up to 32GB DDR4. Nexcom has released its first Intel Smart Display Module (SDM) form-factor signage system. The NDiS S538 runs Linux or Windows 10 on 6th Gen “Skylake” Intel Core or […]

Tiny, Linux-driven Cortex-A5 SBC supports FeatherWing add-ons

Tuesday 2nd of July 2019 04:23:15 PM
Groboards has launched an open-spec, Adafruit Feather-like “Giant Board” starting at $50. The 51 x 23mm SBC runs Linux on Microchip’s Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D SoC and can load more than 60 FeatherWing add-ons. In January, Groboards showed off a Giant Board SBC that adopts the Adafruit Feather form factor and supports FeatherWing add-on boards. Instead of […]

Toughened up embedded computer runs Linux on i.MX8M

Tuesday 2nd of July 2019 02:35:00 PM
Axiomtek is prepping a fanless, rugged “Agent336” embedded computer that runs Linux or Android on a quad Cortex-A53 i.MX8M and offers dual mini-PCIe, CANBus, and E-Mark certification for in-vehicle use. Axiomtek has posted a product page for what appears to be its first i.MX8M-based embedded computer. The “coming soon,” automotive-focused Agent336 is only the second […]

LoRaWAN gateway offers a choice of Orange Pi, Raspberry Pi, or i.MX6 ULL

Monday 1st of July 2019 09:34:47 PM
M2M IOT’s $120 “GW-01” LoRaWAN gateway runs Linux on an Orange Pi Zero H2+ SBC coupled with an 8-channel LoRaWAN board. The GW-01 follows a similar GW-01 RPI add-on for the Raspberry Pi and an i.MX6 ULL based GW-01 PoE gateway. Moscow-based M2M IOT has launched a GW-01 LoRaWAN gateway built around an Orange Pi […]

First open-spec 96Boards SOM modules go on sale with carrier board

Monday 1st of July 2019 06:51:43 PM
Seeed and Beiqicloud have opened pre-orders for the first two 96Boards SOM modules and their common $125 carrier board: the $59 BeiQi RK1808 AIoT and $119 BeiQi RK3399Pro AIoT. In early April, Linaro’s 96Boards project announced the first two 96Boards System-on-Module (SOM) specifications, as well as the first two compute modules to support the 96Boards […]

Rugged Coffee Lake system has PoE and optional Nvidia GTX graphics

Friday 28th of June 2019 07:50:41 PM
Axiomtek’s Linux-friendly, AI-focused “eBOX671-521-FL” computer offers an 8th Gen Coffee Lake, up to 64GB DDR4, and an MXM 3.1 slot for Nvidia GTX graphics. Also onboard: 6x GbE ports, 4x of which support PoE. The fanless, rugged eBOX671-521-FL has a lot in common with the Intel 6th or 7th Gen Core based eBOX671-517-FL industrial NVR […]

Arm-based HMI voice control kit targets industrial applications

Friday 28th of June 2019 03:19:45 PM
Renesas announced an industrial voice control “RZ/G Solution for HMI” kit that runs Linux and Sensory’s TrulyHandsfree voice stack on iWave’s Renesas RZ/G1E-based iW-RainboW-G22D module. There’s also a mic and a 4.3-inch LCD. Renesas has partnered with Sensory, Shinko Shoji Co., and iWave to develop a voice control and speaker ID interface for industrial environments. […]

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Workarea Commerce Goes Open-source

    The enterprise commerce platform – Workarea is releasing its software to the open-source community. In case you don’t already know, Workarea was built to unify commerce, content management, merchant insights, and search. It was developed upon open-source technologies since its inception like Elasticsearch, MongoDB, and Ruby on Rails. Workarea aims to provide unparalleled services in terms of scalability and flexibility in modern cloud environments. Its platform source code and demo instructions are available on GitHub here.

  • Wyoming CV Pilot develops open-source RSU monitoring system

    The team working on the US Department of Transportation’s (USDOT) Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment Program in Wyoming have developed open-source applications for the operation and maintenance of Roadside Units (RSUs) that can be viewed by all stakeholders. The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) Connected Vehicle Pilot implementation includes the deployment of 75 RSUs along 400 miles (644km) of I-80. With long drive times and tough winters in the state, WYDOT needed an efficient way to monitor the performance of and manage and update these units to maintain peak performance. With no suitable product readily available, the WYDOT Connected Vehicle team developed an open-source application that allows authorized transportation management center (TMC) operators to monitor and manage each RSU at the roadside. The WYDOT team found that the application can also be used as a public-facing tool that shows a high-level status report of the pilot’s equipment. [...] For other state or local agencies and departments of transportation (DOTs) wishing to deploy a similar capability to monitor and manage RSUs, the application code has been made available on the USDOT’s Open Source Application Development Portal (OSADP). The code is downloadable and can be used and customized by other agencies free of charge. WYDOT developed this capability using USDOT funds under the CV Pilot program as open-source software and associated documentation. The application represents one of six that the program will be providing during its three phases.

  • You Too Can Make These Fun Games (No Experience Necessary)

    Making a videogame remained a bucket list item until I stumbled on an incredibly simple open source web app called Bitsy. I started playing around with it, just to see how it worked. Before I knew it, I had something playable. I made my game in a couple of hours.

  • From maverick to mainstream: why open source software is now indispensable for modern business

    Free and open source software has a long and intriguing history. Some of its roots go all the way back to the 1980s when Richard Stallman first launched the GNU project.

  • Analyst Watch: Is open source the great equalizer?

    If you had told me 25 years ago that open source would be the predominant force in software development, I would’ve laughed. Back then, at my industrial software gig, we were encouraged to patent as much IP as possible, even processes that seemed like common-sense business practices, or generally useful capabilities for any software developer. If you didn’t, your nearest competitor would surely come out with their own patent claims, or inevitable patent trolls would show up demanding fees for any uncovered bit of code. We did have this one developer who was constantly talking about fiddling with his Linux kernel at home, on his personal time. Interesting hobby.

  • Scientists Create World’s First Open Source Tool for 3D Analysis of Advanced Biomaterials

    Materials scientists and programmers from the Tomsk Polytechnic University in Russia and Germany's Karlsuhe Institute of Technology have created the world’s first open source software for the 2D and 3D visualization and analysis of biomaterials used for research into tissue regeneration. [...] Scientists have already tested the software on a variety of X-ray tomography data. “The results have shown that the software we’ve created can help other scientists conducting similar studies in the analysis of the fibrous structure of any polymer scaffolds, including hybrid ones,” Surmenev emphasised.

  • Making Collaborative Data Projects Easier: Our New Tool, Collaborate, Is Here

    On Wednesday, we’re launching a beta test of a new software tool. It’s called Collaborate, and it makes it possible for multiple newsrooms to work together on data projects. Collaborations are a major part of ProPublica’s approach to journalism, and in the past few years we’ve run several large-scale collaborative projects, including Electionland and Documenting Hate. Along the way, we’ve created software to manage and share the large pools of data used by our hundreds of newsrooms partners. As part of a Google News Initiative grant this year, we’ve beefed up that software and made it open source so that anybody can use it.

  • Should open-source software be the gold standard for nonprofits?

    Prior to its relaunch, nonprofit organization Cadasta had become so focused on the technology side of its work that it distracted from the needs of partners in the field. “When you’re building out a new platform, it really is all consuming,” said Cadasta CEO Amy Coughenour, reflecting on some of the decisions that were made prior to her joining the team in 2018.

  • Artificial intelligence: an open source future

    At the same time, we’re seeing an increasing number of technology companies invest in AI development. However, what’s really interesting is that these companies - including the likes of Microsoft, Salesforce and Uber - are open sourcing their AI research. This move is already enabling developers worldwide to create and improve AI & Machine Learning (ML) algorithms faster. As such, open source software has become a fundamental part of enabling fast, reliable, and also secure development in the AI space. So, why all the hype around open source AI? Why are businesses of all sizes, from industry behemoths to startups, embracing open source? And where does the future lie for AI and ML as a result?

  • How open source is accelerating innovation in AI

    By eradicating barriers like high licensing fees and talent scarcity, open source is accelerating the pace of AI innovation, writes Carmine Rimi No other technology has captured the world’s imagination quite like AI, and there is perhaps no other that has been so disruptive. AI has already transformed the lives of people and businesses and will continue to do so in endless ways as more startups uncover its potential. According to a recent study, venture capital funding for AI startups in the UK increased by more than 200 percent last year, while a Stanford University study observed a 14-times increase in the number of AI startups worldwide in the last two years.

  • Adam Jacob Advocates for Building Healthy OSS Communities in “The War for the Soul of Open Source”

    Chef co-founder and former CTO Adam Jacob gave a short presentation at O’Reilly Open Source Software Conference (OSCON) 2019 titled “The War for the Soul of Open Source.” In his search for meaning in open source software today, Jacob confronts the notion of open source business models. “We often talk about open source business models,” he said. “There isn’t an open source business model. That’s not a thing and the reason is open source is a channel. Open source is a way that you, in a business sense, get the software out to the people, the people use the software, and then they become a channel, which [companies] eventually try to turn into money.” [...] In December 2018, Jacob launched the Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities (SFOSC) project to advocate for these ideas. Instead of focusing on protecting revenue models of OSS companies, the project’s contributors work together to collaborate on writing core principles, social contracts, and business models as guidelines for healthy OSS communities.

  • New Open Source Startups Emerge After Acquisition, IPO Flurry

    After a flurry of mega-acquisitions and initial public offerings of open source companies, a new batch of entrepreneurs are trying their hands at startups based on free software projects.

  • TC9 selected by NIST to develop Open Source Software for Transactive Energy Markets

    TC9, Inc. was selected by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to develop open source software for Transactive Energy Bilateral Markets based on the NIST Common Transactive Services. Under the contract, TC9 will develop open source software (OSS) for agents for a transactive energy market. The software will be used to model the use of transactive energy to manage power distribution within a neighborhood. Transactive Energy is a means to balance volatile supply and consumption in real time. Experts anticipate the use of Transactive Energy to support wide deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) across the power grid.

  • Open Source Software Allows Auterion to Move Drone Workflows into the Cloud

    “Until today, customizing operations in the MAVLink protocol required a deep understanding of complex subjects such as embedded systems, drone dynamics, and the C++ programming language,” said Kevin Sartori, co-founder of Auterion. “With MAVSDK, any qualified mobile developer can write high-level code for complex operations, meaning more developers will be able to build custom applications and contribute to the community.”

  • ApacheCon 2019 Keynote: James Gosling's Journey to Open Source

    At the recent ApacheCon North America 2019 in Las Vegas, James Gosling delivered a keynote talk on his personal journey to open-source. Gosling's main takeaways were: open source allows programmers to learn by reading source code, developers must pay attention to intellectual property rights to prevent abuse, and projects can take on a life of their own.

  • 20 Years of the Apache Software Foundation: ApacheCon 2019 Opening Keynote

    At the recent ApacheCon North America 2019 in Las Vegas, the opening keynote session celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF), with key themes being: the history of the ASF, a strong commitment to community and collaboration, and efforts to increase contributions from the public. The session also featured a talk by astrophysicist David Brin on the potential dangers of AI.

Open Hardware/Modding

  • Delta X open source delta robot kit hits Kickstarter from €179

    After previously being unveiled earlier this month the Delta X open source delta robot kit has now launched via Kickstarter offering open source hardware, firmware and software for the community. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the Arduino powered 3D printed open source robot kit which is now available from €179. The Delta X offers both a complete desktop robot and a modular kit and can be combined with a range of end effectors to complete a wide variety of different applications, offering increased speed and flexibility when compared to other robotic arm kits on the market.

  • AXIS open source 3D printer from $125

    An affordable 3D printer has launched via Kickstarter this week in the form of the AXIS 3D Printer which is priced from just £99, $125 or €115. Complete with dual 3D printing head the 3D printer is based on open source technology with “tried and tested industry standard components designed to work right, first time” say it’s creators.

  • Freemelt raises $1.6 million in investment round for open-source EBM 3D printer
  • 3D printing stethoscopes, tourniquets and crucial dialysis-machine parts in Gaza

    Tarek Loubani is a Palestinian-Canadian doctor who works with the Glia Project, a group that creates open-source designs for 3D-printable medical hardware. Their goal is to let local populations manufacture their own medical wares at prices considerably lower than in the marketplace, and in situations where -- because of distance or war -- it may not even be possible to ship in equipment at any price. Some of their early work has been in blockaded Gaza, for example. So far, Glia has designed a stethoscope that can be made for about $2.83, and a tourniquet that costs about $7 to make.

  • GameShell Kit – Open Source Portable Game Console

    This portable console has a GNU/LINUX embedded operating system that lets you play all kinds of retro games from Atari, GB, GBA, NES, MAME, MD, PS1, and more. You can even create your own games if you want. Get one for yourself or build it together with your kids. Check out more details by clicking the link above.

  • Play classic games on an open-source console with GameShell: $143 (Orig. $199)

Openwashing Leftovers

A Setback for FOSS in the Public (War) Sector, CONNECT Interoperability Project Shifting to the Private Sector

  • GAO: DoD Not Fully Implementing Open-Source Mandates

    The Department of Defense has not fully implemented mandates from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to increase its use of open-source software and release code, according to a September 10 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report. The report notes that the 2018 NDAA mandated DoD establish a pilot program on open source and a report on the program’s implementation. It also says that OMB’s M-16-21 memorandum requires all agencies to release at least 20 percent of custom-developed code as open-source, with a metric for calculating program performance. However, DoD has released less than 10 percent of its custom code, and had not developed a measure to calculate the performance of the pilot program. In comments to GAO, the DoD CIO’s office said there has been difficulty inventorying all of its custom source code across the department, and disagreement on how to assess the success for a performance measure. While the department worked to partially implement OMB’s policy, the department had not yet issued a policy.

  • Pentagon moves slowly on open-source software mandate amid security concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit.

  • DOD struggles to implement open source software pilots

    The Department of Defense’s congressionally mandated efforts to create an open source software program aren’t going so well. DOD must release at least 20 percent of its custom software as open source through a pilot required by a 2016 Office of Management and Budget directive and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act. Open source software, OMB says, can encourage collaboration, “reduce costs, streamline development, apply uniform standards, and ensure consistency in creating and delivering information.”

  • DOD drags feet with open-source software program due to security, implementation concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit. Since 2016, DOD has been required by law to implement an open-source software pilot program in accordance with policy established by the Office of Management and Budget.

  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • CONNECT Interoperability Project Shifting to the Private Sector

    The CONNECT project, an open source project that aims to increase interoperability among organizations, is transitioning from federal stewardship to the private sector and will soon be available to everyone. Developed ten years ago by a group of federal agencies in the Federal Health Architecture (FHA), CONNECT was a response to ONC’s original approach to a health information network. The agencies decided to build a joint health interoperability solution instead of having each agency develop its own custom solution, and they chose to make the project open source.