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Building blocks for the Internet of Things
Updated: 2 hours 54 min ago

Linux and open source hardware for building IoT devices

4 hours 11 min ago
This guide to open source and developer-friendly hardware for IoT device development ranges from simple MCU-based modules to powerful Linux-based SBCs.     An Open Source Perspective on the Internet of Things Part 3: Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT   Most of the 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined […]

96Boards.org goes Cortex-M4 with IoT Edition and Carbon SBC

8 hours 28 min ago
Linaro, 96Boards.org, and SeeedStudio have launched the first 96Boards IoT Edition SBC — a $28 BLE-ready “BLE Carbon” that runs Zephyr on an ST Cortex-M4. Linaro Ltd and its 96Boards.org open hardware standardization group announced the first non-Linux and MCU based 96Boards single board computer, and the first to comply with a new 96Boards IoT […]

BeagleBone Black Wireless SBC taps Octavo SiP, has open design

Tuesday 27th of September 2016 02:21:51 AM
BeagleBoard.org’s “BeagleBone Black Wireless” SBC uses Octavo’s OSD3358 SiP module and replaces the standard BeagleBone Black’s Ethernet with 2.4GHz WiFi and BT 4.1 BLE. BeagleBone Black Wireless is the first SBC to incorporate the Octavo Systems OSD3358 SiP (system-in-package) module, “which integrates BeagleBone functionality into one easy-to-use BGA package,” according to BeagleBoard.org. Announced on Sep. […]

NAS-targeted Skylake Mini-ITX loads up on SATA, GbE, PCIe

Tuesday 27th of September 2016 12:24:16 AM
Aaeon’s Linux-friendly “EMB-Q170C” Mini-ITX board targets NAS applications with 6th Gen Intel Core CPUs, 6x SATA III, 4x USB 3.0, and PCIe x8 and M.2 slots. Aaeon’s EMB-Q170C Mini-ITX board is the most storage-rich member of its EMB-Q170 line of Mini-ITX boards, following the EMB-Q170A, EMB-Q170B, and EMB-H110B boards announced in March. Like these boards […]

SODIMM-style i.MX7 COM features dual GbE, WiFi/BT, eMMC

Monday 26th of September 2016 11:08:14 PM
Variscite’s Linux-driven “VAR-SOM-MX7” COM is shipping with an i.MX7 Dual SoC, WiFi and BLE, dual GbE, and optional eMMC and extended temp. support. Variscite’s VAR-SOM-MX7 follows many other Linux-ready computer-on-modules based on NXP’s i.MX7 SoC, which combines one or two power-stingy, 1GHz Cortex-A7 cores with a 200MHz Cortex-M4 MCU for real-time processing. While most of […]

Debian-based WiFi router adds security and parental controls

Friday 23rd of September 2016 09:07:43 PM
The “Roqos Core” dual-band WiFi-ac router runs Debian on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers a cloud-based security and parental controls service. A Tysons, Virginia headquartered startup called Roqos has begun shipping a home WiFi router, along with cloud-based “advanced cybersecurity and parental control features” sold on a subscription basis. The Roqos Core router costs […]

Tiniest Braswell COM ships, with 4K video, GbE, up to 8GB RAM

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 06:12:56 PM
SolidRun is shipping a tiny module based on Intel Braswell SoCs, and featuring SATA, GbE, HDMI, USB3.0, PCIe, 4K video, up to 8GB RAM, and up to 128GB eMMC. In March, SolidRun pre-announced an “Intel Braswell MicroSOM” family that features a new computer-on-module form factor measuring a wee 53 x 40mm. The Intel Braswell MicroSOM, […]

Hands-on with the quad-core Cortex-A9 Roseapple Pi hacker SBC

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 12:14:15 AM
Guest columnist Rob Reilly checks out the Roseapple Pi, an 85 x 56mm Raspberry Pi imitator based on a quad-core Cortex-A9 Actions Semi S500 SoC.     Hands-on with the quad-core Cortex-A9 Roseapple Pi hacker SBC by Rob Reilly I use Raspberry Pi boards for several real-world jobs. My “STEAMpunk Conference Personality Identification Device” (aka: […]

Open source projects for the Internet of Things, from A to Z

Wednesday 21st of September 2016 09:29:30 PM
This guide to 21 open source projects for IoT ranges from standards organizations to open source frameworks and dev tools.     An Open Source Perspective on the Internet of Things Part 2: 21 Open Source Projects for IoT   The Internet of Things market is fragmented, amorphous, and continually changing, and its very nature […]

A tiny Arduino Zero clone, and an Arduino for cosplayers

Wednesday 21st of September 2016 06:33:30 PM
Rabid Prototypes shipped a tiny Arduino Zero clone called the “Tau,” and launched an expanded Zero-like “Firecricket” for light, sound, and motion control. Early this year, before Boston-based Rabid Prototypes launched its second-generation, 36 x 18mm Neutrino 2.0 Arduino Zero clone on Kickstarter, it mounted a KS project for a smaller, 28 x 15mm “Tau” […]

Open source machine vision board and robot run Linux and Arduino

Wednesday 21st of September 2016 01:47:39 AM
Hicat’s open source, “Livera” machine vision board runs Linux on an ARM9 Hi3518 camera SoC, and Arduino on an Atmel 32u4 MCU, and has an optional robot kit. A startup called Team Hicat has gone to Kickstarter to launch a Hicat Livera machine vision development board and robot kit that runs both Linux and Arduino. […]

Tiny $2 WiFi module taps ESP8285 WiFi SoC

Tuesday 20th of September 2016 02:23:23 AM
[Updated: Sept. 20] — Itead has launched a $2.10, 14 x 13.5mm “PSF-A85” WiFi module based on the ESP8285 SoC, a version of the ESP8266 that adds 1MB SPI flash. In recent months, before releasing the faster, Bluetooth enabled ESP32 big brother to its popular ESP8266 WiFi SoC, China-based Espressif released a follow-on to the […]

Universal prototyping shield supports numerous Arduino models

Monday 19th of September 2016 11:24:25 PM
On Indiegogo, Awesome PCB’s $13 “ArduShield” prototyping shield supports a wide variety of Arduino boards, including the Uno R3, Mini, Mini Pro, and Nano. The ArduShield “universal” prototyping shield is notable for supporting a wide variety of Arduino boards, including the Mini and Mini Pro. Created by Polish developer Szymon Mackow at his company, Awesome […]

i.MX6 UltraLite COM offers up to 64GB on-board eMMC

Monday 19th of September 2016 07:26:29 PM
OpenEmbed’s “SOM6210” COM expands upon NXP’s i.MX6 UL SoC with up to 1GB RAM, up to 64GB eMMC, and optional -40 to 80° operating temperature support. OpenEmbed’s 55 x 42mm SOM6210 computer-on-module is not the smallest or most feature rich of the many COMs that have tapped NXP’s low-power, IoT oriented i.MX6 UltraLite. Yet, its […]

Private cloud server and IoT gateway runs Ubuntu Snappy on RPi

Friday 16th of September 2016 10:42:16 PM
The “Nextcloud Box” is a private cloud server and IoT gateway that combines a Raspberry Pi, running Snappy Ubuntu Core, with a WDLabs 1TB HDD. Nextcloud, Canonical, and WDLabs have collaborated on launching the Nextcloud Box, defined as “a secure, private, self-hosted cloud and Internet of Things (IoT) platform.” The private cloud device provides the […]

Skylake box-PC targets transportation applications

Friday 16th of September 2016 09:58:01 PM
Adlink’s “MXC-6400” is a rugged fanless transportation focused box-PC with a 6th Gen Core CPU, hot-swappable 2.5-inch SATA bays, and lots of PCIe expansion. The MXC-6400 is the third rugged industrial computer we’ve seen from Adlink that runs Intel’s 6th Generation Core “Skylake” processors, following the high-end MXE-5500 and the “value” MVP-6000. While those computers […]

Hands-on with the Orange Pi One quad-core Linux SBC

Friday 16th of September 2016 09:00:19 PM
In this brief hands-on review, Ben Martin takes the low cost, quad-core Orange Pi One hacker SBC for a spin, and benchmarks the board’s performance. The Orange Pi single board computer series lets you run a small Linux machine dedicated to a specific task for a very attractive price — less than $20 for a […]

Rugged, fanless Skylake box-PC has triple GbE and dual HDMI

Thursday 15th of September 2016 10:00:18 PM
Aaeon’s rugged, fanless “Boxer-6639” industrial box-PC features 6th Gen Intel (Skylake) processors plus triple GbE, dual HDMI, and six RS-232/422/485 ports. Following its 5th Gen Broadwell based Boxer-6638U, the “entry level” Boxer-6639 industrial PC taps the 6th Gen “Skylake” Core, Pentium, and Celeron chips. Other Skylake industrial computers include Adlink’s MXE-5500 and lower-end MVP-6000, as […]

An open source perspective on the Internet of Things (part 1)

Thursday 15th of September 2016 03:48:54 AM
This post is the first in a series that examines the IoT, with a focus on Linux and other open source technologies used in home and industrial automation.     An Open Source Perspective on the Internet of Things Part 1: Who Needs It?   Last week, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced it has sold […]

Tiny $2 IoT module runs FreeRTOS on Realtek Ameba WiFi SoC

Thursday 15th of September 2016 02:10:06 AM
[Updated: Sept. 15] — Pine64’s $2 “PADI IoT Stamp” module is based on Realtek’s new “RTL8710AF” Cortex-M3 WiFi SoC, a cheaper FreeRTOS-ready competitor to the ESP8266. Realtek’s RTL8710AF WiFi system-on-chip began showing up on tiny “B&T” labeled modules in July in China on AliExpress, as described in this Hackaday post. The RTL8710AF SoC offers an […]

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Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more