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Updated: 1 hour 31 min ago

GNOME and KDE team up on the Linux desktop, docs for Nvidia GPUs open up, a powerful new way to scan for firmware vulnerabilities, and more news

3 hours 29 min ago

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look two new powerful data visualization tools, Nvidia open sourcing GPU documentation, exciting new tooling to secure firmware for self-driving cars, and more!


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Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

3 hours 29 min ago

When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results.

In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller.


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How to encrypt files with gocryptfs on Linux

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Gocryptfs is a Filesystem in Userspace (FUSE)-mounted file-level encryption program. FUSE-mounted means that the encrypted files are stored in a single directory tree that is mounted, like a USB key, using the FUSE interface. This allows any user to do the mount—you don't need to be root. Because gocryptfs encrypts at the file level, synchronization operations that copy your files can work efficiently on each file.


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How to plan your next IT career move

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Being part of technology-oriented communities has been an essential part of my career development. The first community that made a difference for me was focused on virtualization. Less than a year into my first career-related job, I met a group of friends who were significant contributors to this "vCommunity," and I found their enthusiasm to be contagious. That began our daily "nerd herd," where a handful of us met nearly every day for coffee before our shifts in tech support.


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Designing open audio hardware as DIY kits

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Previously in this series about people who are developing audio technology in the open, I interviewed Juan Rios, developer and maintainer of Guayadeque and Sander Jansen, developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager. These conversations have broadened my thinking and helped me enjoy their software even more than before.


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Happy anniversary GNOME: What's your favorite version?

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:03:00 AM

Today is the 22nd anniversary of the first GNOME release. To celebrate, we want to hear from you. What's your favorite GNOME version? And what does your favorite version say about you? Are you change-averse or are you a pioneer of new releases? Take our poll!


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How to record screencasts in GNOME 3

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

GNOME is a free and open source desktop environment used by most GNU/Linux distributions like Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu. It's designed to "get things done with ease, comfort, and control."


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How to create a vanity Tor .onion web address

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Tor is a powerful, open source network that enables anonymous and non-trackable (or difficult to track) browsing of the internet. It's able to achieve this because of users running Tor nodes, which serve as intentional detours between two otherwise direct paths. For instance, if you are in New Zealand and visit python.nz, instead of being routed next door to the data center running python.nz, your traffic might be routed to Pittsburgh and then Berlin and then Vanuatu and finally to python.nz.


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12 extensions for your GNOME desktop

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

The GNOME desktop is the default graphical user interface for most of the popular Linux distributions and some of the BSD and Solaris operating systems. Currently at version 3, GNOME provides a sleek user experience, and extensions are available for additional functionality.


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9 open source cloud native projects to consider

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

As the practice of developing applications with containers is getting more popular, cloud-native applications are also on the rise. By definition:

"Cloud-native technologies are used to develop applications built with services packaged in containers, deployed as microservices, and managed on elastic infrastructure through agile DevOps processes and continuous delivery workflows."


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4 misconceptions about ethics and bias in AI

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

At PyBay 2019 in August, I will continue a conversation I started at PyBay 2018 about the importance of ethics in the artificial intelligence (AI) we're developing, especially as it gains more and more influence in our everyday lives. In last year's keynote, I dug into how we're overlooking the essential role humans play in AI's future.


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How to install Python on Windows

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

So you want to learn to program? One of the most common languages to start with is Python, popular for its unique blend of object-oriented structure and simple syntax. Python is also an interpreted language, meaning you don't need to learn how to compile code into machine language: Python does that for you, allowing you to test your programs sometimes instantly and, in a way, while you write your code.


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Building a non-breaking breakpoint for Python debugging

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:12:00 AM

This is the story of how our team at Rookout built non-breaking breakpoints for Python and some of the lessons we learned along the way. I'll be presenting all about the nuts and bolts of debugging in Python at PyBay 2019 in San Francisco this month. Let's dig in.

The heart of Python debugging: sys.set_trace

There are many Python debuggers out there. Some of the more popular include:


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To equip tomorrow's cybersecurity experts, we'll need an open approach

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Today's world—marked by an increase of Internet-connected devices, digital assets, and information systems infrastructure—demands more cybersecurity professionals. Cybersecurity is the practice of defending these devices, assets, and systems against malicious cyberattacks from both internal and external entities. Often these cyberattacks are linked to cybercrimes, or crimes committed using a computer to generate profit or to affect the integrity, availability, and confidentiality of the data or system.


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A comprehensive guide to agile project management

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

With a focus on continuous improvements, agile project management upends the traditional linear way of developing products and services. Increasingly, organizations are adopting agile project management because it utilizes a series of shorter development cycles to deliver features and improve continually. This management style allows for rapid development, continuous integration (CI), and continuous delivery (CD).


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Apache Hive vs. Apache HBase: Which is the query performance champion?

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

It's super easy to get lost in the world of big data technologies. There are so many of them that it seems a day never passes without the advent of a new one. Still, such fast development is only half the trouble. The real problem is that it's difficult to understand the functionality and the intended use of the existing technologies.


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Cloud-native Java, open source security, and more industry trends

Monday 12th of August 2019 04:25:00 PM

As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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How Hexdump works

Monday 12th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Hexdump is a utility that displays the contents of binary files in hexadecimal, decimal, octal, or ASCII. It’s a utility for inspection and can be used for data recovery, reverse engineering, and programming.


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What open source is not

Monday 12th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

From its early days, the availability of source code was one of the defining characteristics of open source software. Indeed, Brian Behlendorf of the Apache web server project, an early open source software success, favored "source code available software."


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Poll: Where is your coding happy place?

Monday 12th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Your environment is everything, especially when you're coding. Decisions about what text editor or IDE you'll be using are critical to productivity. But what about your environment beyond the screen?


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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Fedora Program Management, Security and More

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/33

    Week 2019/33 ‘only’ saw three snapshots being published (3 more were given to openQA but discarded).

  • FPgM report: 2019-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. (Just not this week because I will be traveling)

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (freetype, libreoffice, and openjdk-7), Fedora (edk2, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, mariadb-connector-odbc, python-django, and squirrelmail), Gentoo (chromium, cups, firefox, glibc, kconfig, libarchive, libreoffice, oracle-jdk-bin, polkit, proftpd, sqlite, wget, zeromq, and znc), openSUSE (bzip2, chromium, dosbox, evince, gpg2, icedtea-web, java-11-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, kconfig, kdelibs4, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, nodejs8, pdns, polkit, python, subversion, and vlc), Oracle (ghostscript and kernel), Red Hat (mysql:8.0 and subversion:1.10), SUSE (389-ds, libvirt and libvirt-python, and openjpeg2), and Ubuntu (nginx).

  • A compendium of container escapes

    My name is Brandon Edwards, I’m Chief Scientist at Capsule8. Today we’ll be talking about a compendium of container escapes in the podcast. We’ve previously talked about escaping containers and the sorts of vulnerabilities people should be concerned with a while back. In particular we’re discussing how the RunC vulnerability had engendered all this interest, or concern, or almost shock, the trust the people are placing in containers was broken. Oh wow, an escape could happen! I think it’s really valuable to be able to communicate and show all the other ways that that sort of thing can happen, either from misconfiguration, or over granting privileges, or providing host mounts into the container, or having kernel vulnerabilities that could somehow compromise any of the elements of the security model of container, which is both fragile and complex.

  • Apollo data graph brings managed federation to enterprises

    Data graph vendor Apollo is aiming to help overcome several obstacles to enterprises using graph databases with its latest Apollo Data Graph Platform update, which became generally available on July 16. Among the key new features in the platform are federated management capabilities that enable more scalability across different GraphQL data graph instances. GraphQL is an open source query language for APIs, originally created by Facebook that is used to enable data graph capabilities.

Videos: Pardus and Linux Action News

today's howtos, LibreOffice development, 'DevOps' and programming leftovers

  • How to use apt Command in Linux
  • FreeBSD Display Information About The System Hardware
  • btLr text direction in Writer, part 4

    You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office and try it out yourself right now: try unstable snapshot. Collabora is a major contributor to LibreOffice and all of this work will be available in TDF’s next release, too (6.4).

  • LibreOffice Community at FrOSCon 2019

    LibreOffice development takes place mostly via the internet: volunteers, certified developers and other community members collaborate on programming, design, quality assurance, documentation and other tasks. But we also like to meet up in person, to share information, bring new people into the project, and have fun! So on the weekend of 10 and 11 August, we attended FrOSCon 2019 in Sankt Augustin, a town just outside Bonn, Germany. FrOSCon is one of the largest free and open source software (FOSS) conferences in the country, with around 2,000 attendees. Most of the visitors know about FOSS already, but some had only learnt about it recently, and were eager to discover more.

  • 10 ways DevOps helps digital transformation

    DevOps helps organizations succeed with digital transformation by shifting the cultural mindset of the business, breaking down detrimental silos, and paving the way for continuous change and rapid experimentation: All those elements help organizations meet evolving customer demands, experts point out. This helps organizations “self-steer” toward better solutions to continually improve, says Matthew Skelton, head of consulting at Conflux and co-author of Team Topologies.

  • CloudBees Advances State of the DevOps World

    At its annual user conference, CloudBees previews a new Software Delivery Management platform as the DevOps vendor celebrates 15 years of Jenkins.

  • How do you verify that PyPI can be trusted?

    Now Go's packaging story is rather different from Python's since in Go you specify the location of a module by the URL you fetch it from, e.g. github.com/you/hello specifies the hello module as found at https://github.com/you/hello. This means Go's module ecosystem is distributed, which leads to interesting problems of caching so code doesn't disappear off the internet (e.g. a left-pad incident), and needing to verify that a module's provider isn't suddenly changing the code they provide with something malicious. But since the Python community has PyPI our problems are slightly different in that we just have to worry about a single point of failure (which has its own downsides). Now obviously you can run your own mirror of PyPI (and plenty of companies do), but for the general community no one wants to bother to set something up like that and try to keep it maintained (do you really need your own mirror to download some dependencies for the script you just wrote to help clean up your photos from your latest trip?). But we should still care about whether PyPI has been compromised such that packages hosted there have not been tampered with somehow between when the project owner uploaded their release's files and from when you download them.

  • Spyder 4.0 beta4: Kite integration is here

    As part of our next release, we are proud to announce an additional completion client for Spyder, Kite. Kite is a novel completion client that uses Machine Learning techniques to find and predict the best autocompletion for a given text. Additionally, it collects improved documentation for compiled packages, i.e., Matplotlib, NumPy, SciPy that cannot be obtained easily by using traditional code analysis packages such as Jedi.

Events: DebConf19, PyBay 2019, IndieWeb Summit 2019, Cloud Foundry Summit and Open Infrastructure Summit

  • DebConf19: Brazil

    My first DebConf was DebConf4, held in Porte Alegre, Brazil back in 2004. Uncle Steve did the majority of the travel arrangements for 6 of us to go. We had some mishaps which we still tease him about, but it was a great experience. So when I learnt DebConf19 was to be in Brazil again, this time in Curitiba, I had to go. So last November I realised flights were only likely to get more expensive, that I’d really kick myself if I didn’t go, and so I booked my tickets. A bunch of life happened in the meantime that mean the timing wasn’t particularly great for me - it’s been a busy 6 months - but going was still the right move. One thing that struck me about DC19 is that a lot of the faces I’m used to seeing at a DebConf weren’t there. Only myself and Steve from the UK DC4 group made it, for example. I don’t know if that’s due to the travelling distances involved, or just the fact that attendance varies and this happened to be a year where a number of people couldn’t make it. Nonetheless I was able to catch up with a number of people I only really see at DebConfs, as well as getting to hang out with some new folk. Given how busy I’ve been this year and expect to be for at least the next year I set myself a hard goal of not committing to any additional tasks. That said DebConf often provides a welcome space to concentrate on technical bits. I reviewed and merged dkg’s work on WKD and DANE for the Debian keyring under debian.org - we’re not exposed to the recent keyserver network issues due to the fact the keyring is curated, but providing additional access to our keyring makes sense if it can be done easily. I spent some time with Ian Jackson talking about dgit - I’m not a user of it at present, but I’m intrigued by the potential for being able to do Debian package uploads via signed git tags. Of course I also attended a variety of different talks (and, as usual, at times the schedule conflicted such that I had a difficult choice about which option to chose for a particular slot).

  • PyBay 2019: Talking about Python in SF

    We are back to San Francisco! Our team will be joining PyBay's conference, one of the biggest Python events in the Bay Area. For this year, we'll be giving the talk: Building effective Django queries with expressions. PyBay has been a fantastic place to meet new people, connect with new ideas, and integrate this thriving community.

  • Tantek Çelik: IndieWebCamps Timeline 2011-2019: Amsterdam to Utrecht

    While not a post directly about IndieWeb Summit 2019, this post provides a bit of background and is certainly related, so I’m including it in my series of posts about the Summit. Previous post in this series: Reflecting On IndieWeb Summit: A Start [...] I don’t know of any tools to take something like this kind of locations vs years data and graph it as such. So I built an HTML table with a cell for each IndieWebCamp, as well as cells for the colspans of empty space. Each colored cell is hyperlinked to the IndieWebCamp for that city for that year.

  • Meet SUSE at Cloud Foundry Summit in The Hague

    If you’re looking for a great excuse to visit the Netherlands, learn about Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes, and hang out with a cool and interesting community, come meet the SUSE Cloud Application Platform team at the Cloud Foundry Summit EU in The Hague. SUSE is a gold sponsor of the event, so we’ll have a booth complete with live demos and plenty of the cool chameleons that you’ve come to expect of us. 

  • Helping The Hispanic/Latinx Community With Open Source | Open Infrastructure Summit, 2019

    At the Open Infrastructure Summit, 2019, we sat down with Joseph Sandoval, SRE Manager for the Adobe Advertising Cloud platform, to talk about the work he is doing with the Hispanic/Latinx Community.