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Updated: 1 hour 47 min ago

Convert video using Handbrake

Friday 20th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms.


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How to build a URL shortener with Apache

Friday 20th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

Long ago, folks started sharing links on Twitter. The 140-character limit meant that URLs might consume most (or all) of a tweet, so people turned to URL shorteners. Eventually, Twitter added a built-in URL shortener (t.co).


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A brief history of text-based games and open source

Friday 20th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

The Interactive Fiction Technology Foundation (IFTF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and improvement of technologies enabling the digital art form we call interactive fiction. When a Community Moderator for Opensource.com suggested an article about IFTF, the technologies and services it supports, and how it all intersects with open source, I found it a novel angle to the decades-long story I’ve so often told. The history of IF is longer than—but quite enmeshed with—the modern FOSS movement.


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Building tiny container images

Thursday 19th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

When Docker exploded onto the scene a few years ago, it brought containers and container images to the masses. Although Linux containers existed before then, Docker made it easy to get started with a user-friendly command-line interface and an easy-to-understand way to build images using the Dockerfile format. But while it may be easy to jump in, there are still some nuances and tricks to building container images that are usable, even powerful, but still small in size.

First pass: Clean up after yourself


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5 questions to answer before building a community

Thursday 19th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

I've talked to a number of business leaders recently about building communities for their company or product. While everybody recognizes the benefits of having a vibrant and active community, many are unsure about what it means and how to build it. Not knowing these details can mean wasting time and money on things that will not give you the results you want.

While interviewing for community management roles, I started asking for these details to determine whether company leaders understand why they want a community and what they want it to do for them.


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The changing role of DBAs in an "as-a-service" world

Thursday 19th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

There has been a massive evolution in the needs and requirements of managing and running a database in a modern enterprise over the last decade. Database administrators (DBAs) in charge of running enterprise databases are seeing a prevalent shift in focus: instead of ensuring access and availability, they are being asked to develop architecture, design, and scalability strategies that meet business needs and goals.


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3 Emacs modes for taking notes

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

No matter what line of work you're in, it's inevitable you have to take a few notes. Often, more than a few. If you're like many people in this day and age, you take your notes digitally.


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How to check free disk space in Linux

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

Keeping track of disk utilization information is on system administrators' (and others') daily to-do list. Linux has a few built-in utilities that help provide that information.

df

The df command stands for "disk-free," and shows available and used disk space on the Linux system.

df -h shows disk space in human-readable format

df -a shows the file system's complete disk usage even if the Available field is 0


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A 4-step plan for creating teams that aren't afraid to fail

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

Successfully executing on a business goal implies raising questions about that goal—and it absolutely requires safe-to-fail experimentation on the path to achieving that goal. When business goals become inflexible mandates, experimentation goes by the wayside and a failure-adverse culture will prevail.

This four-step process can help open leaders cultivate a culture of experimentation in teams working toward a business goal (rather than creating the kind of failure-adverse culture that risks becoming less innovative).


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3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 06:45:00 AM

As more software businesses are selling open source products, we've seen a corresponding rise in the emphasis of building out developer communities around these products as a key metric for success. Happy users are passionate advocates, and these passionate advocates raise overall awareness of a company's product offerings. Attract the right vocal influencers into your community, and customers become more interested in forming a relationship with your company.


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Ballerina reinvents cloud-native programming

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 02:10:00 PM

Cloud-native programming inherently involves working with remote endpoints: microservices, serverless, APIs, WebSockets, software-as-a-service (SaaS) apps, and more. Ballerina is a cloud-native, general purpose, concurrent, transactional, and statically- and strongly-typed programming language with both textual and graphical syntaxes.


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Getting started with Etcher.io

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

Bootable USB drives are a great way to try out a new Linux distribution to see if you like it before you install. While some Linux distributions, like Fedora, make it easy to create bootable media, most others provide the ISOs or image files and leave the media creation decisions up to the user. There's always the option to use dd to create media on the command line—but let's face it, even for the most experienced user, that's still a pain.


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Tiny tweaks for PowerShell perfection

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

I'm in love with PowerShell. It's the perfect blend of feature-richness and readability in scripting (power) and laconism in the command line (shell). But a rant on the cross-platform open-source awesomeness of PowerShell is best saved for another article (which I've already written and which you must read if you want your life to have meant something).


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Building your team's culture of shared responsibility

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

Effective leaders delegate. Because healthy teams learn and grow when challenged with new tasks—and in order to take on new work without a change in staffing—teams must find ways to be more efficient and productive (or stop doing something that is no longer as important as it once was). If you're a manager or other leader in an open organization, you'll need help meeting all your strategic priorities. Delegating is a great way to get it.


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The oldest, active Linux distro, Slackware, turns 25

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 12:16:00 AM

Patrick Volkerding didn't set out to create a Linux distribution. He just wanted to simplify the process of installing and configuring Softlanding Linux System. But when SLS didn't pick up his improvements, Volkerding decided to release his work as Slackware. On July 17, 1993, he announced version 1.0. A quarter century and 30-plus versions later, Slackware is the oldest actively maintained Linux distribution.


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Sysadmin guides, open source email clients, MacOS apps, SELinux, Firefox extensions, and more

Monday 16th of July 2018 05:55:00 PM

Reader favorites from last week included articles for sysadmins, Linux games, tool round ups, and more.


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Get our Linux networking cheat sheet

Monday 16th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

If your daily tasks include managing servers and the data center's network. The following Linux utilities and commands—from basic to advanced—will help make network management easier.

In several of these commands, you'll see <fqdn>, which stands for "fully qualified domain name." When you see this, substitute your website URL or your server (e.g., server-name.company.com), as the case may be.


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Confessions of a recovering Perl hacker

Monday 16th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

My name's MikeCamel, and I'm a Perl hacker.

There, I've said it. That's the first step.


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Is BDFL a death sentence?

Monday 16th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

A few days ago, Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language and Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) of the project, announced his intention to step away.


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Win a year of access to O&#039;Reilly eBooks, videos, support, and more

Monday 16th of July 2018 06:59:00 AM

OSCON 2018 happens this week in Portland, Oregon! To celebrate, we're giving away a one-year subscription to O'Reilly Safari, a US $399/year membership that gives users access to thousands of technology and business ebooks, videos, live online trainings, and real-time support from experts.


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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed, Akademy, Cutelyst and GUADEC

  • Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed in Linux ( Pro ) Magazine
    Kubuntu Linux has been my preferred Linux distribution for more than 10 years. My attraction to the KDE desktop and associated application set, has drawn from Kubuntu user, to a tester, teacher, developer, community manager and councilor. I feel really privileged to be part of, what can only be described as, a remarkable example of the free software, and community development of an exceptional product. This latest release 18.04, effectively the April 2018 release, is a major milestone. It is the first LTS Long Term Support release of Kubuntu running the “Plasma 5” desktop. The improvements are so considerable, in both performance and modern user interface ( UI ) design, that I was really excited about wanting to tell the world about it.
  • Going to Akademy
    Happy to participate in a tradition I’ve admired from afar but never been able to do myself… until this year. My tickets are bought, my passport is issued, and I’m going to Akademy! Hope to see you all there!
  • System76's New Manufacturing Facility, Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Google Cloud Platform Marketplace, Stranded Deep Now Available for Linux and Cutelyst New Release
    Cutelyst, a C++ web framework based on Qt, has a new release. The update includes several bug fixes and some build issues with buildroot. See Dantti's Blog for all the details. Cutelyst is available on GitHub.
  • GUADEC 2018 Videos: Help Wanted
    At this year’s GUADEC in Almería we had a team of volunteers recording the talks in the second room. This was organized very last minute as initially the University were going to do this, but thanks to various efforts (thanks in particular to Adrien Plazas and Bin Li) we managed to record nearly all the talks. There were some issues with sound on both the Friday and Saturday, which Britt Yazel has done his best to overcome using science, and we are now ready to edit and upload the 19 talks that took place in the 2nd room. To bring you the videos from last year we had a team of 5 volunteers from the local team who spent our whole weekend in the Codethink offices. (Although none of us had much prior video editing experience so the morning of the first day was largely spent trying out different video editors to see which had the features we needed and could run without crashing too often… and the afternoon was mostly figuring out how transitions worked in Kdenlive).
  • GUADEC 2018
    This year I attended my second GUADEC in beautiful Almería, Spain. As with the last one I had the opportunity to meet many new people from the extended GNOME community which is always great and I can’t recommend it enough for anybody involved in the project. [...] Flatpak continues to have a lot of healthy discussions at these events. @matthiasclasen made a post summarizing the BoF so check that out for the discussions of the soon landing 1.0 release. So lets start with the Freedesktop 18.07 (date based versioning now!) runtime which is in a much better place than 1.6 and will be solving lots of problems such as multi-arch support and just long term maintainability. I was really pleased to see all of the investment in BuildStream and the runtime from CodeThink which is really needed in the long term.

Red Hat and Fedora

Android: Video Editors, Antitrust/Forks, and Fuchsia OS

OSS Leftovers

  • Mitre to Use Open Source Tool for Cyber Evaluations on 8 Companies
    Mitre will deploy an open source tool to assess the cybersecurity capabilities of eight companies and subsequently release findings in October as part of an initiative by the nonprofit research organization, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday. The Washington Business Journal reported Tuesday that Mitre will utilize its Adversarial Tactics, Techniques and Common Knowledge platform to help conduct evaluations on the cyber offerings of Carbon Black (Nasdaq: CBLK), CounterTack, CrowdStrike, Cylance, Endgame, Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT), RSA and SentinelOne.
  • News:-Apache’s Project Kafka has released stable latest version 1.1.1
    Apache Kafka is a distributed streaming platform to publish, store, subscribe, and process the records. Kafka is broadly used for real-time streaming of the data between systems or applications. There are various applications in which Kafka is used like samza and confluent for Real-time Financial Alerts. Big brand names like The NewYork Times, Pinterest, Zalando, Rabobank, LINE, trivago are few of them who are using Kafka.
  • Creating Open-Source Projects Companies Want to Sponsor
  • IBM reflects on open source some 20 years into it
    Open source might be a relatively new trend in telecom, but it’s been around at least 20 years, and that’s something OSCON 2018 organizers want to make sure attendees here are aware. The open source convention known as OSCON hosts developers, IT managers, system administrators and just plain geeks who want to learn the latest in blockchain, Kubernetes or other technical arenas and hear inspiring stories about open source. The convention is back in Portland this week after having been held in Austin, Texas, the past two years. In telecom, operators want their vendors to deliver based on open source platforms. Various initiatives are under way, but not every vendor is rushing to the party. Through the Open Networking Foundation (ONF), for example, operators are developing reference designs so that everyone in the supply chain knows what solutions operators plan to procure and deploy.
  • Perspecta Participates in Open Source Summit as Conference Sponsor; Mac Curtis Comments
    Perspecta (NYSE: PRSP) served as a sponsor of the 7th Annual Open Source Summit organized by the Open Source Electronic Health Record Alliance to discuss the use of open source software in industry and government, ExecutiveBiz reported July 13.
  • Get rich with Firefox or *(int *)NULL = 0 trying: Automated bug-bounty hunter build touted
    Do you love Firefox, Linux, and the internet? Are you interested in earning money from the comfort of your own home? Are you OK with a special flavor of Firefox quietly gobbling up memory in a hunt for exploitable security bugs? If so, Mozilla has a deal for you. The open internet organization (and search licensing revenue addict) would like you to go about your usual browsing business with a special Firefox build designed to automatically report potential security flaws in the software back to the mothership. If you do so, and the reported error turns out to be a legit exploitable vulnerability that Firefox engineers can fix, you'll be rewarded as if you'd submitted the errant code to Mozilla's bug bounty program. That's right, kids. Your aimless online procrastination could be your ticket to riches through the ASan Nightly Project.
  • Why an ops career
    It’s been a great “family reunion” of FOSS colleagues and peers in the OSCON hallway track this week. I had a conversation recently in which I was asked “Why did you choose ops as a career path?”, and this caused me to notice that I’ve never blogged about this rationale before. I work in roles revolving around software and engineering because they fall into a cultural sweet spot offering smart and interesting colleagues, opportunities for great work-life balance, and exemplary compensation. I also happen to have taken the opportunity to spend over a decade building my skills and reputation in this industry, which helps me keep the desirable roles and avoid the undesirable ones. Yet, many people in my field prefer software development over operations work.
  • Free and open source software for public health information systems in India
  • David's Progress on The Free Software Directory, internship weeks 2-3
    I'm working on creating a list of free software extensions for Mozilla-based browsers on the Free Software Directory based on data from addons.mozilla.org. This is needed because the official extensions repository includes many proprietary extensions. I found out that it's not possible to use the addons.mozilla.org API to list add-on collections, so I submitted a bug report for this. To my surprise they declined my suggestion, so I had to add a function to my program to parse it manually. Then I went on and wrote a detailed README file to describe the philosophy for the project to make it easy for anyone to contribute. I merged my source code to the Savannah GNU package called Free Software Directory, which also has scripts for importing data from Debian. I started a collection of IceCat add-ons and recommended IceCat (and Abrowser) to use it in Tools -> Add-ons (about:addons) -> Get Add-ons.
  • PHP version 5.6.37, 7.0.31, 7.1.20 and 7.2.8
  • An Introduction to Using Git
    If you’re a developer, then you know your way around development tools. You’ve spent years studying one or more programming languages and have perfected your skills. You can develop with GUI tools or from the command line. On your own, nothing can stop you. You code as if your mind and your fingers are one to create elegant, perfectly commented, source for an app you know will take the world by storm.
  • Open Source and Standard-Essential Patents: More Alike Than Not
    The unspoken question that this paper raises in my mind is whether it may be incorrect to speak of Open Source and standardization as separate activities at all.  Instead, Open Source might correctly be viewed as a species of standardization activity, with particular license conditions and membership conditions. The success of Open Source activities—and other standards that implement royalty-free commitments, such as Bluetooth—shows that there’s a place in the continuum of standards policy for royalty-free licensing when participants wish that to be the case.