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Updated: 1 hour 16 min ago

How-tos for Raspberry Pi, CNC milling, WTF, Cypht, HomeBank, Wekan, and more

11 hours 55 min ago

Articles on turning a Raspberry Pi 3B_ into a PriTuni VPN and CNC milling with open source software were our biggest hits last week, and a "getting started with" tutorial series by Kevin Sonney dominated our top 10 list.


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Get started with TaskBoard, a lightweight kanban board

20 hours 12 min ago

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

Here's the ninth of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019.


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Booting Linux faster

20 hours 13 min ago

Of all the computers I've ever owned or used, the one that booted the quickest was from the 1980s; by the time your hand moved from the power switch to the keyboard, the BASIC interpreter was ready for your commands. Modern computers take anywhere from 15 seconds for a laptop to minutes for a small home server to boot. Why is there such a difference in boot times?


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Solving the Year 2038 problem in the Linux kernel

20 hours 13 min ago

Because of the way time is represented in Linux, a signed 32-bit number can't support times beyond January 19, 2038 after 3:14:07 UTC. This Year 2038 (Y2038 or Y2K38) problem is about the time data type representation. The solution is to use 64-bit timestamps.


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2019 People's Choice Awards: Cast your vote

20 hours 14 min ago

The People's Choice Award recognizes the community's favorite contributors from 2018. Voting is open from January 21 - January 31.

Nominees are individuals whose 2018 contributions made a big impact in our community. Some are now members of our Contributors Club, which recognizes writers who have made 3 or more contributions in 12 months. We excluded previous winners and Red Hat associates from this list.

Learn more about each nominee below.


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2019 Reader's Choice Award: Cast your vote

20 hours 15 min ago

In 2018, Opensource.com published more than 1,000 articles and welcomed hundreds of writers to our community. This wouldn't be possible without an amazing community of authors, moderators, contributors, readers, and sharers. Join us in celebration of our 9-year anniversary by voting in our 2019 Opensource.com Community Awards.


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How did you get started with Linux?

Sunday 20th of January 2019 08:01:00 AM

The Linux mascot is a penguin named Tux, so we thought it appropriate to celebrate Penguin Awareness Day for the conservation of penguin habitats and talk a little bit (more) about Linux.

A few fun penguin facts: These furry creatures are flightless yet part of the bird family. Some are large, like the Emperor penguin, and some are small, like those found in New Zealand. And, the Gentoo penguin is known to swim up to a speed of 21 miles per hour!


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Get started with HomeBank, an open source personal finance app

Sunday 20th of January 2019 08:00:00 AM

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

Here's the eighth of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019.


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Keeping casual open source contributors happy and more news

Saturday 19th of January 2019 12:22:00 PM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we look at how scholars are bringing medieval literature into the digital age using open source software, keeping casual contributors to open source projects happy, the release of the Fifth Internet Edition of The Linux Command Line, and more.


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Get started with Roland, a random selection tool for the command line

Saturday 19th of January 2019 08:00:00 AM

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

Here's the seventh of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019.


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Get started with WTF, a dashboard for the terminal

Friday 18th of January 2019 08:03:00 AM

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

Here's the sixth of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019.


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CNC milling with open source software

Friday 18th of January 2019 08:01:00 AM

I'm always looking for new projects to create with my 3D printer. When I recently saw a new design for a computer numeric code (CNC) milling machine that mostly uses 3D printed parts, I was intrigued. When I saw that the machine works with open source software and the controller is an Arduino running open source software, I knew I had to make one.


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Governance without rules: How the potential for forking helps projects

Friday 18th of January 2019 08:00:00 AM

The speed and agility of open source projects benefit from lightweight and flexible governance. Their ability to run with such efficient governance is supported by the potential for project forking. That potential provides a discipline that encourages participants to find ways forward in the face of unanticipated problems, changed agendas, or other sources of disagreement among participants. The potential for forking is a benefit that is available in open source projects because all open source licenses provide needed permissions.


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Get started with CryptPad, an open source collaborative document editor

Thursday 17th of January 2019 08:03:00 AM

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

Here's the fifth of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019.


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Create a Kubernetes cron job in OKD

Thursday 17th of January 2019 08:02:00 AM

It can be daunting to get started with Kubernetes and OKD (a Kubernetes distribution formerly known as OpenShift Origin). There are a lot of concepts and components to take in and understand. This tutorial walks through creating an example Kubernetes cron job that uses a service account and a Python script to list all the pods in the current project/namespace. The job itself is relatively useless, but this tutorial introduces many parts of the Kubernetes & OKD infrastructure.


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What's your favorite desktop Linux distribution?

Thursday 17th of January 2019 08:00:00 AM

When you start to ask people what their favorite Linux distribution is, everyone has at least one opinion. We're looking for yours.

People choose their favorites for a slew of reasons. It could be just the distro they started with, they may love the UI or the packaging format, or they find it to be especially stable or performant on their hardware. Perhaps they love the support they get, or the community around it. Or, it could be any number of other reasons.


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Engage more and dictate less in 2019

Thursday 17th of January 2019 08:00:00 AM

"Says easy, does hard." That's a Southern expression I've really grown to appreciate. And it's especially relevant this time of year, when people are making their 2019 resolutions. Change of any kind—either personal or organizational—can be easy to conceptualize in the abstract. But making that change, actually doing the work of changing, is much more difficult.


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Get started with Cypht, an open source email client

Wednesday 16th of January 2019 08:03:00 AM

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

Here's the fourth of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019.


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The Evil-Twin Framework: A tool for testing WiFi security

Wednesday 16th of January 2019 08:02:00 AM

The increasing number of devices that connect over-the-air to the internet over-the-air and the wide availability of WiFi access points provide many opportunities for attackers to exploit users. By tricking users to connect to rogue access points, hackers gain full control over the users' network connection, which allows them to sniff and alter traffic, redirect users to malicious sites, and launch other attacks over the network..


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Using Linux containers to analyze the impact of climate change and soil on New Zealand crops

Wednesday 16th of January 2019 08:01:00 AM

New Zealand's economy is dependent on agriculture, a sector that is highly sensitive to climate change. This makes it critical to develop analysis capabilities to assess its impact and investigate possible mitigation and adaptation options. That analysis can be done with tools such as agricultural systems models. In simple terms, it involves creating a model to quantify how a specific crop behaves under certain conditions then simulating altering a few variables to see how that behavior changes.


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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more

Programming: Homebrew 1.9, JBoss EAP, Python, Qt and Inclusion

  • Homebrew 1.9 Adds Linux Support, Auto-Cleanup, and More
    The latest release of popular macOS package manager Homebrew includes support for Linux, optional automatic package cleanup, and extended binary package support. Linux support, merged from the Linuxbrew project, is still in beta and will become stable in version 2.0. It also enables the use of Homebrew on Windows 10 systems with the Windows Subsystem for Linux installed. Auto-cleanup is meant to optimize disk space occupation by removing all intermediate data that Homebrew generates when installing packages. This can be a significant amount when Homebrew actually builds the packages from sources instead of just installing binaries. Auto-cleanup is opt-in by setting the HOMEBREW_INSTALL_CLEANUP. This behaviour will become opt-out in version 2.0, where you will be able to set the HOMEBREW_NO_INSTALL_CLEANUP environment variable to disable auto-cleanup.
  • Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1
  • Counteracting Code Complexity With Wily - Episode 195
    As we build software projects, complexity and technical debt are bound to creep into our code. To counteract these tendencies it is necessary to calculate and track metrics that highlight areas of improvement so that they can be acted on. To aid in identifying areas of your application that are breeding grounds for incidental complexity Anthony Shaw created Wily. In this episode he explains how Wily traverses the history of your repository and computes code complexity metrics over time and how you can use that information to guide your refactoring efforts.
  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.3.1 Released
    The Qt VS Tools version 2.3.1 has now been released to the Visual Studio Marketplace.
  • Ben Cotton: Inclusion is a necessary part of good coding
    Too often I see comments like “some people would rather focus on inclusion than write good code.” Not only is that a false dichotomy, but it completely misrepresents the relationship between the two. Inclusion doesn’t come at the cost of good code, it’s a necessary part of good code. We don’t write code for the sake of writing code. We write code for people to use it in some way. This means that the code needs to work for the people. In order to do that, the people designing and implementing the technology need to consider different experiences. The best way to do that is to have people with different experiences be on the team. As my 7th grade algebra teacher was fond of reminding us: garbage in, garbage out.

Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux
    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time. Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.
  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support
    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.
  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve
    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey. In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.