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Updated: 1 hour 27 min ago

Why I use rxvt as my terminal

9 hours 23 min ago

I'm a fan of Konsole and GNOME Terminal, and I use them both regularly. They're great projects, and they represent modern terminals that meet the needs of users who spend their day in a shell, as well as users who only dip into a Unix shell every now and again. They integrate nicely into a desktop environment, bridging the gap between common GUI tasks and common shell tasks. I use GNOME Terminal at work and Konsole at home, and I enjoy them both.


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Formatting NFL data for doing data science with Python

9 hours 24 min ago

No matter what medium of content you consume these days (podcasts, articles, tweets, etc.), you'll probably come across some reference to data. Whether it's to back up a talking point or put a meta-view on how data is everywhere, data and its analysis are in high demand.

As a programmer, I've found data science to be more comparable to wizardry than an exact science. I've coveted the ability to get ahold of raw data and glean something useful and concrete from it. What a useful talent!


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How GNOME uses Git

9 hours 25 min ago

“What’s your GitLab?” is one of the first questions I was asked on my first day working for the GNOME Foundation—the nonprofit that supports GNOME projects, including the desktop environment, GTK, and GStreamer. The person was referring to my username on GNOME’s GitLab instance.


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How to make a Halloween lantern with Inkscape

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:03:00 AM

The spooky season is almost here! This year, decorate your haunt with a unique Halloween lantern made with open source!

Typically, a portion of a lantern's structure is opaque to block the light from within. What makes a lantern a lantern are the parts that are missing: windows cut from the structure so that light can escape. While it's impractical for lighting, a lantern with windows in spooky shapes and lurking silhouettes can be atmospheric and a lot of fun to create.


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My Linux story: I grew up on PC Magazine not candy

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

In 1998, the movie Titanic was released, mobile phones were just a luxury, and pagers were still in use. This was also the year I got my first computer. I can remember the details as if it were yesterday: Pentium 133MHz and just 16MB of memory. Back in that time (while running nothing less than Windows 95), this was a good machine. I can still hear in my mind the old spinning hard drive noise when I powered that computer on, and see the Windows 95 flag.


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Pros and cons of event-driven security

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

Great news, everyone! Forrester Research says that 95% of all recorded breaches in 2016 came from only three industries: government, technology, and retail. Everyone else is safe... ish, right?


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System76 will ship Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news

Sunday 13th of October 2019 06:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we cover System76 shipping Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news!


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Everything you need to know about Grace Hopper in six books

Friday 11th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Grace Hopper is one of those iconic figures that really needs no introduction. During her long career in the United States Navy, she was a key figure in the early days of modern computing. If you have been involved in open source or technology in general, chances are you have already heard several anecdotes about Grace Hopper. The story of finding the first computer bug, perhaps? Or maybe you have heard some of her nicknames: Queen of Code, Amazing Grace, or Grandma COBOL?


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How a business was built on podcasts for Linux: The story of Jupiter Broadcasting

Friday 11th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

I spend a lot of time on the road and enjoy listening to podcasts about a variety of topics.


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5 ways to contribute to open source during Hacktoberfest

Friday 11th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

There's always a lot to get excited about in October: sweater weather, pumpkin spice, Halloween costumes, and for the last three years, Hacktoberfest.


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Achieve high-scale application monitoring with Prometheus

Thursday 10th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Prometheus is an increasingly popular—for good reason—open source tool that provides monitoring and alerting for applications and servers. Prometheus' great strength is in monitoring server-side metrics, which it stores as time-series data.


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DevSecOps pipelines and tools: What you need to know

Thursday 10th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

DevOps is well-understood in the IT world by now, but it's not flawless. Imagine you have implemented all of the DevOps engineering practices in modern application delivery for a project. You've reached the end of the development pipeline—but a penetration testing team (internal or external) has detected a security flaw and come up with a report. Now you have to re-initiate all of your processes and ask developers to fix the flaw.


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Climate challenges call for open solutions

Thursday 10th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

Global climate change affects us all. It is, at its heart, an energy issue—a problem too large and too complex for any single person, company, university, research institute, science laboratory, nuclear trade association, or government to address alone. It will require a truly global, cooperative effort, one aimed at continued innovation across a range of technologies: renewables, batteries, carbon capture, nuclear power development, and more.


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Start developing in the cloud with Eclipse Che IDE

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

In the many, many technical interviews I've gone through in my professional career, I've noticed that I'm rarely asked questions that have definitive answers. Most of the time, I'm asked open-ended questions that do not have an absolutely correct answer but evaluate my prior experiences and how well I can explain things.

One interesting open-ended question that I've been asked several times is:

"As you start your first day on a project, what five tools do you install first and why?"


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How to use clipboard managers on Linux

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

You probably copy and paste snippets of text on your computer multiple times a day without ever thinking about it. You may take it for granted, because it's older than Unix, with its earliest implementation through macros or manual repetition of line-editor commands. While the process has largely remained the same over the past 15 years, there's a side to copy and paste that many users never see: the clipboard manager.


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Why to choose Rust as your next programming language

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

Choosing a programming language for a project is often a complicated decision, particularly when it involves switching from one language to another. For many programmers, it is not only a technical exercise but also a deeply emotional one. The lack of known or measurable criteria for picking a language often means the choice digresses into a series of emotional appeals.


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Kubernetes communication, SRE struggles, and more industry trends

Tuesday 8th of October 2019 04:30:00 PM

As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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7 steps to securing your Linux server

Tuesday 8th of October 2019 07:03:00 AM

This primer will introduce you to basic Linux server security. While it focuses on Debian/Ubuntu, you can apply everything presented here to other Linux distributions. I also encourage you to research this material and extend it where applicable.

1. Update your server

The first thing you should do to secure your server is to update the local repositories and upgrade the operating system and installed applications by applying the latest patches.

On Ubuntu and Debian:


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Fight for the planet: Building an open platform and open culture at Greenpeace

Tuesday 8th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Global problems require global solutions.

Few organizations know this better than Greenpeace. For nearly 50 years, the non-profit has been campaigning for a greener and more peaceful future.

But in 2015, Greenpeace found itself at a crossroads. To address the climate emergency, Greenpeace knew it needed to shift its organizational culture.


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Manage multiple versions of Go with GVM

Tuesday 8th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

Go Version Manager (GVM) is an open source tool for managing Go environments. It supports installing multiple versions of Go and managing modules per-project using GVM "pkgsets." Developed originally by Josh Bussdieker, GVM (like its Ruby counterpart, RVM) allows you to create a development environment for each project or group of projects, segregating the different Go versions and package dependencies to allow for more flexibility and prevent versioning issues.


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More in Tux Machines

Games: The Universim, POSTAL 4: No Regerts, RPCS3, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Games Archive and X-Plane

  • City building god sim 'The Universim' will now let you launch rockets with satellites into orbit

    The Universim is slowly turning into a city building god game truly worth playing, with the Sky High update now available expanding the game into planetary orbit. Being able to actually launch things into space is a stepping stone towards visiting other planets. Currently, the Cosmodrome will allow you to send up Defence Satellites that will enable ground to air defences for your Defence Towers. So now you have a reasonable chance to take down meteors and other threats from space.

  • POSTAL 4: No Regerts released into Early Access, Linux version likely in future

    Running With Scissors are back, with a surprise release of POSTAL 4: No Regerts on Steam and a Linux version is looking likely in future. Naturally, someone posted on Steam to ask about the possibility of Linux support. This is something that happens a lot but here it's a bit different. RWS already supported Linux with multiple previous Postal releases.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 is coming along quickly with their August progress report up

    Delayed as usual due to the progress reports being done by contributors, the team working on the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 have another post up to show off more incredible progress. To start with, they have again changed how they list what games are playable and not with the removal of games that won't work due to servers being shut down. They said even if RPCS3 becomes 100% complete, they wouldn't work unless someone accurately emulated and hosted servers for them. With that in mind, they also did a lot of testing of games that previously only went in-game to see how many are now properly playable. Thanks to all the testing, the Playable category has jumped up to 1,426 titles!

  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition arrives on Linux on November 5th

    Feral Interactive have finally confirmed the Linux release date for Shadow of the Tomb Raider after announcing it for Linux back in November last year. They've said today it will officially release as "Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition" on November 5th! Looking around at dates, technically this is the earliest we've seen any of the newer Tomb Raider series arrive on Linux. The first Tomb Raider came to Linux in 2016 after an original 2013 release, with Rise of the Tomb Raider arriving on Linux 2018 after an original 2016 release and we get the final game in the reboot trilogy next month!

  • The Internet Archive website has added another 2,500 MS-DOS games

    Another point scored for game preservation. The Internet Archive have added another 2,500 MS-DOS games you can play right in your browser. In their official announcement, they said that while they've added a few more to their collection here and there this is the biggest yet and it ranges from "tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago".

  • 2,500 More MS-DOS Games Playable at the Archive

    Another few thousand DOS Games are playable at the Internet Archive! Since our initial announcement in 2015, we’ve added occasional new games here and there to the collection, but this will be our biggest update yet, ranging from tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago.

  • Vulkan support is not far away now for the flight sim X-Plane 11, physics & flight model updates coming

    X-Plane 11, the detailed flight simulator is finally closing in on an update that will bring in Vulkan support as detailed in a new developer blog post.

7 Linux Applications You Should Start Using Right Now

Linux used to be the go-to operating system among the tech-savvy crowd. Because back in the day, it was a lot more demanding to use. Now Linux has modern, user-friendly distributions such as Ubuntu and Mint. The application repository they have in common has matured too. Customizing it to your heart’s desire is now easier than ever before. And this should be the end goal — to mold the OS into a tool that’s custom-tailored to your needs. So if you haven’t already, consider installing the following types of applications. Read more

Firefox’s New WebSocket Inspector

The Firefox DevTools team and our contributors were hard at work over the summer, getting Firefox 70 jam-packed with improvements. We are especially excited about our new WebSocket inspection feature, because you told us in feedback how important it would be for your daily work. To use the inspector now, download Firefox Developer Edition, open DevTools’ Network panel to find the Messages tab. Then, keep reading to learn more about WebSockets and the tricks that the new panel has up its sleeve. But first, big thanks to Heng Yeow Tan, the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) student who’s responsible for the implementation. Read more

Windows 10 vs. Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Driver Performance With Intel Icelake Iris Plus Graphics

With picking up the Dell XPS 7390 with Intel Core i7-1065G7 for being able to deliver timely benchmarks from Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Icelake generation, one of the first areas we have been testing is the Iris Plus "Gen 11" graphics performance. In this article are our initial Windows 10 vs. Linux graphics performance numbers for Ice Lake. For this very first Intel Iris Plus Gen11 graphics testing are results from Windows 10 compared to Ubuntu 19.10. Ubuntu Linux was benchmarked with its stock driver stack comprised of Mesa 19.2.1 as well as opting for the "Iris" Gallium3D driver and also testing Mesa 19.3-devel both with the default i965 OpenGL driver and the Iris Gallium3D driver. Of course, for the Vulkan tests on Linux is their sole "ANV" Vulkan driver. The Dell XPS 7390 was equipped with the Intel Core i7-1065G7 Ice Lake processor and its Iris Plus Graphics, 2 x 8GB LPDDR4 3733MHz memory, 500GB Toshiba NVMe solid-state drive, and 1920x1200 panel. Read more