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Updated: 6 hours 54 min ago

Schedule a visit with the Emacs psychiatrist

11 hours 52 min ago

Welcome to another day of the 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

Some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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Head to the arcade in your Linux terminal with this Pac-Man clone

Saturday 15th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Welcome back to another day of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what command-line toys are all about. Basically, they're games and simple diversions that help you have fun at the terminal.

Some are new, and some are old classics. We hope you enjoy.


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The Linux terminal is no one-trick pony

Friday 14th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

Welcome to another day of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

Some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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Tips for using Flood Element for performance testing

Friday 14th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

In case you missed it, there’s a new performance test tool on the block: Flood Element. It’s a scalable, browser-based tool that allows you to write scripts in JavaScript that interact with web pages like a real user would.

Browser Level Users is a newer approach to load testing that overcomes many of the common challenges we hear about traditional methods of testing. It offers:


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Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science

Friday 14th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming.

So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices.


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Relax by the fire at your Linux terminal

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

Welcome back. Here we are, just past the halfway mark at day 13 of our 24 days of Linux command-line toys. If this is your first visit to the series, see the link to the previous article at the bottom of this one, and take a look back to learn what it's all about. In short, our command-line toys are anything that's a fun diversion at the terminal.

Maybe some are familiar, and some aren't. Either way, we hope you have fun.


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One developer's road: Programming and mental illness

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

In early 1997, my dad bought a desktop PC pre-installed with Microsoft Windows 98. An 11-year-old elementary school student at the time, I started learning the applications. Six months later, we got internet access using a dial-up modem, and I learned the basics of accessing the World Wide Web and discovered Netscape Navigator.


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Podman and user namespaces: A marriage made in heaven

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Podman, part of the libpod library, enables users to manage pods, containers, and container images. In my last article, I wrote about Podman as a more secure way to run containers. Here, I'll explain how to use Podman to run containers in separate user namespaces.


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Preventing "Revenge of the Ancillaries" in DevOps

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

In "Why Doctors Hate Their Computers," Atul Gawande describes the frustration medical professionals experience when the requirements imposed by the electronic health records (EHR) system they must use to annotate their patient interactions get in the way of those same patient interactions. Sumit Rana, a senior vice president of EHR company Epic, called one of the more frustrating problems "the Revenge of the Ancillaries." Gawande wrote:


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Patch into The Matrix at the Linux command line

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

You've found your way to today's entry from the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be wondering what a command-line toy even is? It's anything that's an entertaining diversion at the terminal, be it a game, a fun utility, or a simple distraction.

Some of these are classics, and some are completely new (at least to me), but I hope all of you find something you enjoy in this series.


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Top 5 configuration management tools

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

DevOps is evolving and gaining traction as organizations discover how it enables them to produce better applications and reduce their software products' time to market.

DevOps' core values are Culture, Automation, Measurement, and Sharing (CAMS), and an organization's adherence to them influences how successful it is.


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Taking notes with Standard Notes

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Online note-taking tools seem to have bloomed like 100 flowers. The tallest ones in that garden are usually proprietary, closed source applications like Evernote, Zoho Notebook, Google Keep, and Notion.


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5 resolutions for open source project maintainers

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

I'm generally not big on New Year's resolutions. I have no problem with self-improvement, of course, but I tend to anchor around other parts of the calendar. Even so, there's something about taking down this year's free calendar and replacing it with next year's that inspires some introspection.

In 2017, I resolved to not share articles on social media until I'd read them. I've kept to that pretty well, and I'd like to think it has made me a better citizen of the internet. For 2019, I'm thinking about resolutions to make me a better open source software maintainer.


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Winterize your Bash prompt in Linux

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

Hello once again for another installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is? Really, we're keeping it pretty open-ended: It's anything that's a fun diversion at the terminal, and we're giving bonus points for anything holiday-themed.

Maybe you've seen some of these before, maybe you haven't. Either way, we hope you have fun.


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40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year.


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An introduction to Kubeflow

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Model construction and training are just a small part of supporting machine learning (ML) workflows. Other things you need to address include porting your data to an accessible format and location; data cleaning and feature engineering; analyzing your trained models; managing model versioning; scalably serving your trained models; and avoiding training/serving skew. This is particularly the case when the workflows need to be portable and consistently repeatable and have many moving parts that need to be integrated.


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Companies behind on digital transformation get ahead with open leaders

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

(Editor's note: The newest volume in the Open Organization book series, The Open Organization Leaders Manual, Second Edition, debuts today at Opensource.com. This is the book's introduction.)


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Fun on the Linux command-line, Ansible, DevOps, best books, and more

Monday 10th of December 2018 06:25:00 PM

The first few installments in our 24 days of fun Linux command-line tricks dominated our top 10 list last week. 

Do you have a suggestion for the list? Leave a comment on one of the articles or shoot us a note: open@opensource.com.

Stay up on what's going on with Opensource.com by subscribing to our highlights newsletter.


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When Linux required installation parties

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

I studied math in college. Back then, ordinarily, math students didn't have access to the computer lab; pen and paper were all we needed to do our work. But for my one required programming class, I got access to the college computer lab.

It was running SunOS with remote X terminals (this was circa 1996). I immediately fell in love with Unix. I fell in love with the command line, X Windows, the utilities—all of it.


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How to build deep learning inference through Knative serverless framework

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Deep learning is gaining tremendous momentum in certain academic and industry circles. Inference—the capability to retrieve information from real-world data based on pre-trained models—is at the core of deep learning applications.


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More in Tux Machines

Schedule a visit with the Emacs psychiatrist

Welcome to another day of the 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal. Some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone. Today's selection is a hidden gem inside of Emacs: Eliza, the Rogerian psychotherapist, a terminal toy ready to listen to everything you have to say. Read more

Download User Guide Books of All Ubuntu Flavors

This is a compilation of download information of user guide books of Ubuntu and the 5 Official Flavors (Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Studio). You can find either complete user guides (even for server edition), installation guide, or tutorials compilation; either in PDF or HTML format; plus where to purchase two official ebooks of Ubuntu MATE. On the end of this tutorial, I included how to download the HTML-only documentation so you can read it completely offline. I hope you will find all of books useful and you can print them out yourself. Get the books, print them, share with your friends, read and learn Ubuntu All Flavors. Read more

Games: Desert Child, KKnD, Twice Circled

  • Desert Child Now Available on Linux, PC, and Mac OS
    Akupara Games is here with an all-new game that blends a mix of hoverbikes with shooting and racing alongside high-resolution pixel art. It's odd to see a game try so many different genres, but Desert Child does that and more. Adventure games are also covered, as you have to go from place to place and explore the world. Your overall goal is to leave Earth before it blows up, and winning the Grand Prix allows you to go to Mars and escape the planet.
  • The KKnD remake using the OpenRA engine has a first release out
    KKnD, the classic strategy game is being revived and the new open source project has the first release out. I was going to write this up last night, but it seems I jumped the gun a bit before they had all the bits in place. Nice to see such quick and polite communication from their team though. Unlike Red Alert and the other titles served by OpenRA, KKnD and KKnD 2 were not made freeware. You will still need the games for the full experience. However, this remake will download the demo files for you to get you going.
  • The lovely aquarium building game Megaquarium just had a big update
    Twice Circled are adding in plenty of new features to Megaquarium as promised, with a major update now available.

Debian Installer Buster Alpha 4 release

The Debian Installer team[1] is pleased to announce the fourth alpha release of the installer for Debian 10 "Buster". Foreword ======== I'd like to start by thanking Christian Perrier, who spent many years working on Debian Installer, especially on internationalization (i18n) and localization (l10n) topics. One might remember graphs and blog posts on Planet Debian with statistics; keeping track of those numbers could look like a pure mathematical topic, but having uptodate translations is a key part of having a Debian Installer that is accessible for most users. Thank you so much, Christian! Read more Also: Debian Installer Buster Alpha 4 Released