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Updated: 9 min 36 sec ago

How to program with Bash: Syntax and tools

4 hours 4 min ago

A shell is the command interpreter for the operating system. Bash is my favorite shell, but every Linux shell interprets the commands typed by the user or sysadmin into a form the operating system can use. When the results are returned to the shell program, it sends them to STDOUT which, by default, displays them in the terminal. All of the shells I am familiar with are also programming languages.


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How to build a Flatpak

4 hours 4 min ago

A long time ago, a Linux distribution shipped an operating system along with all the software available for it. There was no concept of “third party” software because everything was a part of the distribution. Applications weren’t so much installed as they were enabled from a great big software repository that you got on one of the many floppy disks or, later, CDs you purchased or downloaded.


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Pylint: Making your Python code consistent

4 hours 7 min ago

Pylint is a higher-level Python style enforcer. While flake8 and black will take care of "local" style: where the newlines occur, how comments are formatted, or find issues like commented out code or bad practices in log formatting.


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To space and beyond with open source

Saturday 19th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

Carl Sagan once said, "The universe is a pretty big place. If it's just us, seems like an awful waste of space." In that vast desert of seeming nothingness hides some of the most mysterious and beautiful creations humankind ever has—or ever will—witness.


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Perceiving Python programming paradigms

Friday 18th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Early each year, TIOBE announces its Programming Language of The Year. When its latest annual TIOBE index report came out, I was not at all surprised to see Python again winning the title, which was based on capturing the most search engine ranking points (especially on Google, Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, and Baidu) in 2018.


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How to use Protobuf for data interchange

Friday 18th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

Protocol buffers (Protobufs), like XML and JSON, allow applications, which may be written in different languages and running on different platforms, to exchange data. For example, a sending application written in Go could encode a Go-specific sales order in Protobuf, which a receiver written in Java then could decode to get a Java-specific representation of the received order. Here is a sketch of the architecture over a network connection:


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How I built and maintain Cantata, an open source music player

Friday 18th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

This is the third in a series of conversations with developers who build and maintain open source music players. Craig Drummond is the developer and maintainer of Cantata, an open source music player that acts as a frontend (client) to the Music Player Daemon (MPD) music server. I have two small headless computers at home configured as music servers—one connected to our stereo in our living room, one in my upstairs office.


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Intro to the Linux useradd command

Thursday 17th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Adding a user is one of the most fundamental exercises on any computer system; this article focuses on how to do it on a Linux system.

Before getting started, I want to mention three fundamentals to keep in mind. First, like with most operating systems, Linux users need an account to be able to log in. This article specifically covers local accounts, not network accounts such as LDAP. Second, accounts have both a name (called a username) and a number (called a user ID). Third, users are typically placed into a group. Groups also have a name and group ID.


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How to type emoji on Linux

Thursday 17th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

Emoji are those fanciful pictograms that snuck into the Unicode character space. They're all the rage online, and people use them for all kinds of surprising things, from signifying reactions on social media to serving as visual labels for important file names. There are many ways to enter Unicode characters on Linux, but the GNOME desktop makes it easy to find and type an emoji.


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Measuring the business value of open source communities

Thursday 17th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

In Measuring the health of open source communities, I covered some of the key questions and metrics that we’ve explored as part of the CHAOSS project as they relate to project founders, maintainers, and contributors. In this article, we focus on open source corporate constituents (such as open source program offices, business risk and legal teams, human resources, and others) and end users.


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Open source interior design with Sweet Home 3D

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

There are three schools of thought on how to go about decorating a room:


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Predicting NFL play outcomes with Python and data science

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

If you made through part 1, congrats! You have the patience it takes to format data. In that article, I cleaned up my National Football League data set using a few Python libraries and some basic football knowledge. Picking up where I left off, it's time to take a closer look at my data set.


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Drupal shows leadership on diversity and inclusion

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

I didn't expect DrupalCon Seattle's opening keynote to address the barriers that hold people back from making open source contributions. So imagine my surprise when Dries Buytaert, Drupal's project lead and co-founder and CTO of Acquia, which created Drupal, used his time onstage to share an apology.


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Why I use rxvt as my terminal

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

I'm a fan of Konsole and GNOME Terminal, and I use them both regularly. They're great projects, and they represent modern terminals that meet the needs of users who spend their day in a shell, as well as users who only dip into a Unix shell every now and again. They integrate nicely into a desktop environment, bridging the gap between common GUI tasks and common shell tasks. I use GNOME Terminal at work and Konsole at home, and I enjoy them both.


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Formatting NFL data for doing data science with Python

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

No matter what medium of content you consume these days (podcasts, articles, tweets, etc.), you'll probably come across some reference to data. Whether it's to back up a talking point or put a meta-view on how data is everywhere, data and its analysis are in high demand.

As a programmer, I've found data science to be more comparable to wizardry than an exact science. I've coveted the ability to get ahold of raw data and glean something useful and concrete from it. What a useful talent!


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How GNOME uses Git

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

“What’s your GitLab?” is one of the first questions I was asked on my first day working for the GNOME Foundation—the nonprofit that supports GNOME projects, including the desktop environment, GTK, and GStreamer. The person was referring to my username on GNOME’s GitLab instance.


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How to make a Halloween lantern with Inkscape

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:03:00 AM

The spooky season is almost here! This year, decorate your haunt with a unique Halloween lantern made with open source!

Typically, a portion of a lantern's structure is opaque to block the light from within. What makes a lantern a lantern are the parts that are missing: windows cut from the structure so that light can escape. While it's impractical for lighting, a lantern with windows in spooky shapes and lurking silhouettes can be atmospheric and a lot of fun to create.


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My Linux story: I grew up on PC Magazine not candy

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

In 1998, the movie Titanic was released, mobile phones were just a luxury, and pagers were still in use. This was also the year I got my first computer. I can remember the details as if it were yesterday: Pentium 133MHz and just 16MB of memory. Back in that time (while running nothing less than Windows 95), this was a good machine. I can still hear in my mind the old spinning hard drive noise when I powered that computer on, and see the Windows 95 flag.


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Pros and cons of event-driven security

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

Great news, everyone! Forrester Research says that 95% of all recorded breaches in 2016 came from only three industries: government, technology, and retail. Everyone else is safe... ish, right?


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System76 will ship Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news

Sunday 13th of October 2019 06:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we cover System76 shipping Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news!


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More in Tux Machines

Excellent Utilities: cheat.sh – community driven cheat sheet

This is a series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’re covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. There’s a complete list of the tools in this series in the Summary section. Erik Karlsson, one of our regular contributors, has curated the finest free books that help you learn whatever programming language takes your fancy. There’s everything covered from C, C++, Java, Python, R, and much more. Link: Excellent Free Books to Master Programming. The books offer an exceptional amount of information. But sometimes you’ll need some very specific information that you can access instantly. Erik is currently curating his recommendations for high quality free programming tutorials. But until they’re ready, we are showcasing a utility that offers an alternative to programming tutorials. Step forward cheat sheets with cheat.sh. What makes cheat.sh special? It offers unified access to the best community driven cheat sheets repositories of the world. cheat.sh uses selected community driven cheat sheet repositories and information sources, maintained by thousands of users, developers and authors all over the world. Besides covering 58 programming languages, it also offers cheat sheets for more than 1,000 Linux commands, and access to information from Stack Overflow. Read more

Games: LinuxGSM, Boxtron, Total War: WARHAMMER II

  • Need an easy way to manage a Linux game server? LinuxGSM is great and recently passed 100 supported titles

    A project that perhaps isn't as well known as it should be: LinuxGSM makes managing Linux game servers easy and they recently hit a fun milestone. It supports running servers for games like 7 Days to Die, Barotrauma, various Counter-Strike versions, Don't Starve Together, Minecraft and a ton more. Starting way back sometime in 2012, the lead developer Daniel Gibbs emailed in to notify us that they recently hit a huge milestone for the project as it now supports over 100 different games. There's a number of other ways to run game servers but the point of LinuxGSM is that each game is tweaked and tested by them, with an easy to run installer and script to manage all parts of it. Running updates, getting notifications sent to various places like Discord, Telegram, Email and more when it's having issues is simple to setup.

  • Boxtron, the Steam Play compatibility tool for DOSBox brings more improvements in another update

    The Speedy Staging 0.5.3 of Boxtron is out, further improving this Steam Play compatibility tool for DOSBox gaming on Linux. As a reminder of the what and why: Just like how Proton enables you to play Windows games in the Linux Steam client, Boxtron is a tool that can be manually added to the Linux Steam client to run a native version of DOSBox. It's supposed to give you the best experience possible with DOS games on Steam. Rather than running them through Proton you get lower input lag, working Steam integration, better fullscreen support and so on.

  • You can now grab the Gotrek and Felix DLC for Total War: WARHAMMER II free

    Just a quick tip for Total War: WARHAMMER II fans this Monday morning, as you can now grab the previously White Dwarf Magazine exclusive DLC Gotrek and Felix for free. While they're only for Total War: WARHAMMER II, if you own both Total War: WARHAMMER titles they are also available in the expansive Mortal Empires campaign.

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