Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 48 min 26 sec ago

5 reasons to run Kubernetes on your Raspberry Pi homelab

18 hours 44 min ago

There's a saying about the cloud, and it goes something like this: The cloud is just somebody else's computer. While the cloud is actually more complex than that (it's a lot of computers), there's a lot of truth to the sentiment. When you move to the cloud, you're moving data and services and computing power to an entity you don't own or fully control. On the one hand, this frees you from having to perform administrative tasks you don't want to do, but, on the other hand, it could mean you no longer control your own computer.


read more

5 tips for making documentation a priority in open source projects

18 hours 45 min ago

Open source software is now mainstream; long gone are the days when open source projects attracted developers alone. Nowadays, users across numerous industries are active consumers of open source software, and you can't expect everyone to know how to use the software just by reading the code.


read more

You don't need a computer science degree to work with open source software

18 hours 46 min ago

I am mostly a self-taught programmer. When I was growing up in the late 1970s, our elementary school had a small resource room with an Apple II computer. My brother and I fell into a group of friends that liked computers, and we all helped each other learn the system.


read more

Modernize network function development with this Rust-based framework

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 07:01:00 AM

The world of networking has undergone monumental shifts over the past decade, particularly in the ongoing move from specialized hardware into software defined network functions (NFV) for data plane1 and packet processing.


read more

What I learned while teaching C programming on YouTube

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

The act of breaking something down in order to teach it to others can be a great way to reacquaint yourself with some old concepts and, in many cases, gain new insights.


read more

Creating and debugging Linux dump files

Tuesday 4th of August 2020 07:02:00 AM

Crash dump, memory dump, core dump, system dump … all produce the same outcome: a file containing the state of an application's memory at a specific time—usually when the application crashes.

Knowing how to deal with these files can help you find the root cause(s) of a failure. Even if you are not a developer, dump files created on your system can be very helpful (as well as approachable) in understanding software.

This is a hands-on article, and can you follow along with the example by cloning the sample application repository with:


read more

Use your favorite programming language to provision Infrastructure as Code

Tuesday 4th of August 2020 07:01:00 AM

As you navigate the world of IT and technology, there are some terms you come across repeatedly. Some of them are hard to quantify and may take on different meanings as time goes on. "DevOps" is an example of a word that seems (to me) to change depending on the person using it; the original DevOps pioneers might not even recognize what we call DevOps today.


read more

An open source solution for continuous testing at scale

Tuesday 4th of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

In Sogeti's most recent World Quality Report, software testing ranked No. 1 in terms of its contributions to business objectives and growth, making it a key enabler for business digitalization. Despite this, the software testing industry still reports major pain points related to test maintenance, automation, tooling, and skills. Most of the tooling in common use lacks capabilities, is too complex to integrate, provides insufficient intelligence, or is too difficult to use.


read more

Do math in the Linux shell with GNU bc

Monday 3rd of August 2020 07:02:00 AM

Most POSIX systems come with GNU bc, an arbitrary precision numeric processing language. Its syntax is similar to C, but it also supports interactive execution of statements and processing data from standard in (stdin). For that reason, it's often the answer to the question, "How do I do math in the Linux shell?" This style of response is common online:


read more

Practice parsing text in NLP with Python

Monday 3rd of August 2020 07:01:00 AM

Natural language processing (NLP) is a specialized field for analysis and generation of human languages. Human languages, rightly called natural language, are highly context-sensitive and often ambiguous in order to produce a distinct meaning. (Remember the joke where the wife asks the husband to "get a carton of milk and if they have eggs, get six," so he gets six cartons of milk because they had eggs.) NLP provides the ability to comprehend natural language input and produce natural language output appropriately.


read more

Why I use Ingress Controllers to expose Kubernetes services

Monday 3rd of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

The meteoric rise of containerization and microservices has been necessary to meet the growing demand for applications, but getting it right means overcoming some critical network orchestration challenges. Out of the complexities that developers of cloud-native applications face, strategically utilizing Kubernetes ingress controllers is among the most difficult components to understand—and among the most important.


read more

Why making mistakes makes me a better sysadmin

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

I've been a Fedora Linux contributor for a little over a decade now. Fedora has a large community of developers and users, each with a unique set of skills ranging from being a particularly discerning user to being an amazing programmer. I like this because it inspires and motivates me to develop new skills of my own.


read more

8 tips for running a virtual hackathon

Saturday 1st of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

Hackathons are events where developers, product managers, designers, and others come together to tackle problems over a short time period. They have become increasingly popular over the last 15 years after OpenBSD ran the first hackathon in June 1999.

These events provide several benefits—greater engagement across the community, innovation and new ideas, awareness for the organizers, and networking opportunities for participants.


read more

Bring your Mycroft AI voice assistant skill to life with Python

Friday 31st of July 2020 07:01:00 AM

In the first two articles of this series on Mycroft, an open source, privacy-focused digital voice assistant, I covered the background behind voice assistants and some of Mycroft's core tenets.


read more

Why we open sourced our Python platform

Friday 31st of July 2020 07:00:00 AM

The team at Anvil recently open sourced the Anvil App Server, a runtime engine for hosting web apps built entirely in Python.

The community reaction has been overwhelmingly positive, and we, at Anvil, have already incorporated lots of that feedback into our next release. But one of the questions we keep getting asked is, "Why did you choose to open source such a core part of your product?"


read more

Defining cloud native, expanding the ecosystem, and more industry trends

Thursday 30th of July 2020 01:30:00 PM

As part of my role as a principal communication strategist at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are three of my and their favorite articles from that update.


read more

Monitor systemd journals via email

Thursday 30th of July 2020 07:02:00 AM

Modern Linux systems often use systemd as their init system and manager for jobs and many other functions. Services managed by systemd generally send their output (of all forms: warnings, errors, informational messages, and more) to the systemd journal, not to traditional logging systems like syslog.


read more

10 cheat sheets for Linux sysadmins

Thursday 30th of July 2020 07:01:00 AM

When you're a systems administrator, you don't just have one job; you have ALL the jobs, and often each one is on-demand with little to no warning. Unless you do a task every day, you may not always have all the commands and options you need in mind when you need them. And that's why I love cheat sheets.

Cheat sheets help you avoid silly mistakes, they keep you from having to look through pages of documentation, and they keep you moving efficiently through your tasks. I've selected my favorite 10 cheat sheets for any sysadmin, regardless of experience level.


read more

4 ways I contribute to open source as a Linux systems administrator

Thursday 30th of July 2020 07:00:00 AM

I recently participated in The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit North America, held virtually June 29-July 2, 2020. In the course of that event, I had the opportunity to speak with a fellow attendee about my career in Linux systems administration and how it had led me to a career focused on open source. Specifically, he asked, how does a systems administrator who doesn't do a lot of coding participate in open source projects?

That's a great question!


read more

Bypass your Linux firewall with SSH over HTTP

Wednesday 29th of July 2020 07:01:00 AM

With the growth of connectivity and remote jobs, accessing remote computing resources becomes more important every day. But the requirements for providing external access to devices and hardware make this task complex and risky. Aiming to reduce this friction, ShellHub is a cloud server that allows universal access to those devices, from any external network.


read more

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

PCLinuxOS: Interview, systemd, Meemaw and Screenshot Showcase

  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: pyjujiop

    I am a professional journalist who has been in the profession since 1993. At the current time I am a freelancer working for media relations firms and open to new clients! My main client is operated by an old colleague of mine, who is hoping to bring me on full-time. [...] I have two computers presently running PCLinuxOS as their primary OS. One is a Dell Inspiron 1545 laptop that has been completely overhauled; it now runs a 3.06 GHz T9900 CPU, 6 GB of RAM, and has both a 256GB SSD and a 640GB HDD installed. The other is a desktop with an Athlon X4 870K CPU at 3.9 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM and several HDDs and SSDs installed in the case. We have two other Windows machines and an Amazon tablet that Kay uses. [...] Honestly, I have no complaints about it. I would like PCLinuxOS to gain more users, but only because it would hopefully get more people to donate. I have no idea how Tex and the community manage to keep it as well maintained as they do. I returned to PCLinuxOS because I preferred the community-based model and the philosophy of this distro over using anything related to Ubuntu.

  • Mind Your Step: Miscellaneous Topics

    I have seen what could be accomplished with certain other distributions. The addition of support for FlatPak and AppImage applications is a great start towards the future of the distribution. I know we all hate systemd, so I won't even suggest the inclusion of this monstrosity. The original intention of systemd was to simplify the system initialization functions found in SysV INIT scripts as well as the scripts contained in the /etc/rc/rc.d directory into one system controlled by one daemon. Those of us who have worked with Mac OS-X or Windows in the past know what a PITA it is to maintain these operating systems and their startup routines. After having looked at systemd and its documentation, I do not see any reason why we should ever implement such a thing here!!!!!! But, what if there was another solution. MX-Linux (formerly MEPIS) has a solution in the form of the systemd API replacement package. Such a package would not be easy to implement, and if anyone had the time to do it, it could be done. But then, if Flatpak can be implemented without systemd, then is there really any reason why technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, or even QEMU could be implemented without systemd? (BTW, I got QEMU 5.0 to compile on PCLinuxOS with all emulated processors enabled. It took three hours on my laptop, but it got the job done. I have yet to test it, though.) Another possibility is to create an ISO with the basics (including the base X.org installation), but without the graphical interface launching at startup. This would be useful for server installations, for low-spec machines, and for those of you who have trouble getting the graphical interface to work at all..

  • From The Chief Editor's Desk

    What we commonly call and hold dear as Linux almost had a different name. Torvalds briefly considered "Linux," a play on his first name and Unix, but considered it too egotistical. So, he changed the name to "Freax," combining the words "free," "freak," and "Unix." However, Ari Lemmke, one of the volunteer administrators of the FTP server at the Helsinki University of Technology at the time, thought "Freax" was a dumb name, and took it upon himself to rename it Linux. The name stuck. Tux, the Linux mascot, didn't come about until five years later. In 1996, when they were about to select the mascot, Torvalds mentioned he was bitten by a little penguin (Eudyptula minor) on a visit to the National Zoo & Aquarium in Canberra, Australia. Larry Ewing provided the original draft of today's well known mascot based on this description. The name Tux was suggested by James Hughes as derivative of Torvalds' UniX, along with being short for tuxedo, a type of suit with color similar to that of a penguin. ******************** This month's magazine cover was designed by Meemaw. It celebrates the 29th anniversary of the Linux announcement, the announcement of the IBM PC on August 12, 1981, and August being Watermelon Month. During the dog days of summer, there's little else as refreshing as some ice cold watermelon to cool us off. Until next month, I bid you peace, happiness, prosperity, serenity, and continued good health!

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase

Introducing Inkscape 1.0

Smoother performance, HiDPI support, new & improved Live Path Effects & native macOS app After a little over three years in development, the team is excited to launch the long awaited Inkscape 1.0 into the world. Built with the power of a team of volunteers, this open source vector editor represents the work of many hearts and hands from around the world, ensuring that Inkscape remains available free for everyone to download and enjoy. In fact, translations for over 20 languages were updated for version 1.0, making the software more accessible to people from all over the world. A major milestone was achieved in enabling Inkscape to use a more recent version of the software used to build the editor's user interface (namely GTK+3). Users with HiDPI (high resolution) screens can thank teamwork that took place during the 2018 Boston Hackfest for setting the updated-GTK wheels in motion. Read more Also: Inkscape Tutorial: Inkscape 1.0 New Features

Android Leftovers