Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 4 hours 1 min ago

How to build a smog sensor with a ESP8266 microcontroller

4 hours 57 min ago

Stuttgart, Germany has, like many other cities, a smog problem—even if it may be less severe than in other cities. The European Union has defined a threshold of on average 50 micrograms of dust particles per cubic meter in a 24-hour window of air to be allowed for a maximum of 35 days a year. For the last few years, actual values have been much higher for more than 35 days. There are governmental stations that measure the air pollution, but they can’t be everywhere for obvious reasons.


read more

Survey seeks to discover the motivations behind open source contributions

4 hours 58 min ago

Peer production is one of three fundamental ways to organize human economic activity, along with markets and firms. Yet, although it underlies billions of dollars in open source software production, it is the least understood. Participants in open source are not organized in firms, where they would work under the supervision of managers and earn a salary, nor are they individuals in a market, responding to price signals.


read more

14 ways being a runner is like working in tech

4 hours 59 min ago

I started running more than a decade after I started working in tech, but I quickly saw similarities between the two activities that take up most my time. I know—and have run with—many people in tech who also happen to be runners, but I suspect my observations work well for other fields, too. I've rounded up a list of ways being a runner is like working in tech.


read more

The 4 components of a great decision

5 hours 24 sec ago

In a previous article in this series, I wrote about front-line engagement in Japan and explained how communication technology is enabling ownership of decisions, especially among front-line workers.


read more

Using vi-mode in your shell

Monday 27th of March 2017 12:15:00 PM

As a participant in the greater open source community, and more specifically as a member of the Fedora Project, I have the opportunity to meet with many people and talk about all kinds of interesting technical topics. One of my favorites is the "command line," or shell, because learning about how people use the shell proficiently can give you an insight into how they think, what kind of workflows they favor, and to some extent what makes them tick.


read more

A Python script for fixing smart quotes in text

Monday 27th of March 2017 07:01:00 AM

About six years ago, we had a question on the Scribus mail list from someone who wanted to know whether there was an automated way to convert typewriter quotation marks to typographic quotes. In case you don't know what this means, typographic quotes (for example, and ) are sometimes referred to as curly quotes, rather than the incorrect versions on your typewriter (i.e., ").


read more

Getting to know core components, speed mentoring, and more OpenStack news

Monday 27th of March 2017 05:00:00 AM

Welcome to Opensource.com's look at what's happening in the world of OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project. Starting next week, we're going to transition to a monthly format for our OpenStack news roundup. But never fear, OpenStackers, we'll be filling April with an in-depth look at the upcoming OpenStack Summit in Boston, MA. Let us know what's on your mind and which talks you hope we'll preview.


read more

A Game Boy emulator for the Apple Watch, RPG Maker comes to Linux, and more gaming news

Saturday 25th of March 2017 07:00:00 AM

In this bi-weekly open gaming roundup, we take a look at a Game Boy emulator for your Apple Watch, RPG Maker for Linux, Star Citizen switching to Vulkan, and more open gaming news.

Open gaming roundup for March 11-25, 2017

Open source emulator lets you play Game Boy games on an Apple Watch


read more

Top 5: Kubernetes on the Raspberry Pi, Securing your Raspberry Pi, and more

Friday 24th of March 2017 04:00:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we highlight Kubernetes on the Raspberry Pi, securing your Raspberry Pi, services for securing your email, making things cheaper with your 3D printer, and why users choose Linux and open source software.

Top 5 articles of the week

5. Why do you use Linux and open source software?


read more

Which Linux command shell do you prefer?

Friday 24th of March 2017 07:02:00 AM

Which command shell do you prefer?

When we asked this question a year ago as a part of our article on open source shell options, over six thousand of you responded, and Bash was the overwhelming winner that time around. But preferences change over time, and we thought it was high time to ask again. Which shell do you use, and why?


read more

Open source job opportunities grow at crisis groups

Friday 24th of March 2017 07:01:00 AM

According to the United Nations, the number of people affected by a humanitarian crisis has doubled in the past decade. With it, so has the need for open source skilled people to join teams dedicated to solving problems associated with these emergency situations. (Read: 11 ways to get involved with Humanitarian FOSS by Heather Leson)


read more

3 open source link shorteners

Thursday 23rd of March 2017 07:03:00 AM

Nobody likes an impossibly long URL.

They're hard to decipher. But sometimes, between a deep directory structure on a site, plus a large number of parameters tacked on to the end, URLs just begin to get unwieldy. And back in the days before Twitter added their own link shortener to their service, a long URL meant taking precious characters away from your tweets.


read more

Open Labs leads 48-hour hackathon for good

Thursday 23rd of March 2017 07:01:00 AM

The local hackerspace in Tirana, Albania might be small, but they make up for size in spirit. During the weekend of March 18-19, 2017, the Open Labs Hackerspace organized the first-ever, 48-hour "open source" hackathon focused on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.


read more

How to write a web service using Python Flask

Thursday 23rd of March 2017 07:01:00 AM

Many of our customers are building useful services using our webhook feature—but unfortunately, others are not. Often we hear that no one on their team is proficient enough to write a service that can ingest a webhook payload and do something with the data. That leaves them either hoping to get cycles from their development team (unlikely) or continuing to do without.


read more

What does an ad agency's source code look like?

Thursday 23rd of March 2017 07:00:00 AM

In a previous article, I explained why "openness" is a solution the advertising industry should consider when attaining growth. I also explained how we've so far misunderstood the promise of openness.

This article will articulate exactly what it means for agencies to "go open," and what that will entail.

The 'open source' advertising agency

"Open": universally accessible and open to contribution
"Source": the unique logic that solves certain problems.


read more

Two open source secure email services

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 07:03:00 AM

As much we all complain about email, for most of us, email is still our primary conduit for online communication. That said, numerous hacks and revelations about government surveillance have made it clear that email is also one of the most vulnerable of those conduits.

What you send via email is your business and yours alone. Besides you and the recipient, no one else should be reading that message. Not hackers, not government agencies, and definitely not nosy siblings or friends.


read more

5 big ways AI is rapidly invading our lives

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 07:02:00 AM

Open source projects are helping drive artificial intelligence advancements, and we can expect to hear much more about how AI impacts our lives as the technologies mature. Have you considered how AI is changing the world around you already? Let's take a look at our increasingly artificially enhanced universe and consider the bold predictions about our AI-influenced future.


read more

2 new tools for creating more accessible projects

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 07:01:00 AM

Accessibility has been an afterthought in development for far too long. The result has been costly retrofitting, the risk of inaccessible solutions, and unhappy users.

We are where we are because developers often ignore accessibility in hopes that it will resolve on its own.


read more

Help us write the next IT culture book

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 07:00:00 AM

If open organizations should be flexible, inclusive, collaborative, and communal, then so should the books we write about them.

So as the open organization community at Opensource.com prepares its next volume in the Open Organization book series, it's working the open source way.


read more

How to deploy Kubernetes on the Raspberry Pi

Tuesday 21st of March 2017 07:02:00 AM

When I became interested in ARM devices, and in the Raspberry Pi in particular, my first project was an OpenVPN server.

By having the Raspberry Pi as a secure gateway to my home network, I could use my phone to control my desktop and remotely play Spotify, open documents, and a bunch of other fun things. I used an existing tutorial for that first project because I was afraid of piping anything into the command line on my own.


read more

More in Tux Machines

Tizen and Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Making your OpenStack monitoring stack highly available using Open Source tools
    Operators tasked with maintaining production environments are relying on monitoring stacks to provide insight to resource usage and a heads-up to threats of downtime. Perhaps the most critical function of a monitoring stack is providing alerts which trigger mitigation steps to ensure an environment stays up and running. Downtime of services can be business-critical, and often has extremely high cost ramifications. Operators working in cloud environments are especially reliant on monitoring stacks due to the increase in potential inefficiency and downtime that comes with greater resource usage. The constant visibility of resources and alerts that a monitoring stack provides, makes it a fundamental component of any cloud.
  • InfraRed: Deploying and Testing Openstack just made easier!
  • The journey of a new OpenStack service in RDO
    When new contributors join RDO, they ask for recommendations about how to add new services and help RDO users to adopt it. This post is not a official policy document nor a detailed description about how to carry out some activities, but provides some high level recommendations to newcomers based on what I have learned and observed in the last year working in RDO.
  • Getting to know the essential OpenStack components better
  • Getting to know core components, speed mentoring, and more OpenStack news
  • Testing LibreOffice 5.3 Notebookbar
    I teach an online CSCI class about usability. The course is "The Usability of Open Source Software" and provides a background on free software and open source software, and uses that as a basis to teach usability. The rest of the class is a pretty standard CSCI usability class. We explore a few interesting cases in open source software as part of our discussion. And using open source software makes it really easy for the students to pick a program to study for their usability test final project.
  • [Older] Drupal member sent out after BDSM lifestyle revealed

    Drupal, like many other open source projects, has a stated goal of welcoming and accepting all people, no matter their heritage, culture, sexual orientation, gender identity or other factors.

  • Controversy Erupts in Open-Source Community After Developer's Sex Life Made Public
    Drupal is a popular open-source content-management system, used to build websites. Like many other open-source projects, Drupal is guided by several committees that are supposed to be accountable to the community and its code of conduct, which enshrines values like "be considerate" and "be respectful." Also like many other open-source projects, Drupal attracts all sorts of people, some of whom are eclectic. Last week, under murky circumstances, Drupal creator Dries Buytaert banned one of the project's technical and community leaders, Larry Garfield. Buytaert attributed the decision to aspects of Garfield's private sex life. Many Drupal users and developers are up in arms about the perceived injustice of the move, exacerbated by what they see as a lack of transparency.
  • HospitalRun: Open Source Software for the Developing World
    When open source software is used for global health and global relief work, its benefits shine bright. The benefits of open source become very clear when human health and human lives are on the line. In this YouTube video, hear Harrisburg, Pennsylvania software developer Joel Worrall explain about HospitalRun software – open source cloud-based software used at developing world healthcare facilities.
  • Scotland emphasises sharing and reuse of ICT
    Scotland’s public administrations should focus on common, shared technology platforms, according to the new digital strategy, published on 22 March. The government says it wants to develop “shared infrastructure, services and standards in collaboration with our public sector partners, to reduce costs and enable resources to be focused on front-line services.”
  • [Older] OpenSSL Re-licensing to Apache License v. 2.0 To Encourage Broader Use with Other FOSS Projects and Products

    OpenSSL Launches New Website to Organize Process, Seeks to Contact All Contributors

  • Austria state secretary promotes open data
    The State Secretary at Austria’s Federal Chancellery, Muna Duzdar, is encouraging the making available of government data as open data. “The administration must set an example and support the open data culture by giving society its data back”, the State Secretary for Digitalisation said in a statement.
  • Study: Hungary should redouble open data initiatives
    The government of Hungary should redouble its efforts to make public sector information available as open data, and actively help to create market opportunities, a government white paper recommends. The ‘White Paper on National Data Policy’ was approved by the government in December.
  • Williamson School Board OKs developing open source science curriculum
    Science textbooks may be a thing of the past in Williamson County Schools. The Williamson County school board approved a proposal Monday night to use open source science resources instead of science textbooks. The switch will require a team of nine teachers to spend a year developing an open source curriculum.
  • How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access
    It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access.
  • #0: Introducing R^4
  • RcppTOML 0.1.2

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • FedEx Will Pay You $5 to Install Flash on Your Machine
    FedEx is making you an offer you can’t afford to accept. It’s offering to give you $5 (actually, it’s a discount on orders over $30) if you’ll just install Adobe Flash on your machine. Nobody who knows anything about online security uses Flash anymore, except when it’s absolutely necessary. Why? Because Flash is the poster child for the “security-vulnerability-of-the-hour” club — a group that includes another Adobe product, Acrobat. How unsafe is Flash? Let’s put it this way: seven years ago, Steve Jobs announced that Flash was to be forever banned from Apple’s mobile products. One of the reasons he cited was a report from Symantec that “highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009.” Flash security hasn’t gotten any better since.
  • Every once in a while someone suggests to me that curl and libcurl would do better if rewritten in a “safe language”
  • An insecure dishwasher has entered the IoT war against humanity

    Regel says that he has contacted Miele on a number of occasions about the issue, but had failed to get a response to his missives, and this has no updated information on the vulnerability.

    He added, bleakly that "we are not aware of an actual fix."

  • Monday Witness: It's Time to Reconize a Civil Right Not to be Connected
    Along with death and taxes, two things appear inevitable. The first is that Internet of Things devices will not only be built into everything we can imagine, but into everything we can't as well. The second is that IoT devices will have wholly inadequate security, if they have any security at all. Even with strong defenses, there is the likelihood that governmental agencies will gain covert access to IoT devices anyway. What this says to me is that we need a law that guarantees consumers the right to buy versions of products that are not wirelessly enabled at all.
  • Remember kids, if you're going to disclose, disclose responsibly!
    If you pay any attention to the security universe, you're aware that Tavis Ormandy is basically on fire right now with his security research. He found the Cloudflare data leak issue a few weeks back, and is currently going to town on LastPass. The LastPass crew seems to be dealing with this pretty well, I'm not seeing a lot of complaining, mostly just info and fixes which is the right way to do these things.

Lightroom and Darktable: the verdict two years after switching

In summer 2015, I posted a detailed account of my tentative switch from Windows7 and Lightroom to Linux and Darktable. This was sparked by sudden crashes that were afflicting my system, but in a deeper sense grew from frustration with Windows and, to a lesser degree, with Lightroom. Once I headed for Linux, I decided to plunge in fully and commit to using Ubuntu and free, open-source photo software for several months – at least until the end of that year. That would give me a chance to see whether I could actually run my photography business on the new system. Read more