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Updated: 3 hours 26 min ago

GNOME and KDE team up on the Linux desktop, docs for Nvidia GPUs open up, a powerful new way to scan for firmware vulnerabilities, and more news

Saturday 17th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look two new powerful data visualization tools, Nvidia open sourcing GPU documentation, exciting new tooling to secure firmware for self-driving cars, and more!


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Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

Saturday 17th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results.

In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller.


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How to encrypt files with gocryptfs on Linux

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Gocryptfs is a Filesystem in Userspace (FUSE)-mounted file-level encryption program. FUSE-mounted means that the encrypted files are stored in a single directory tree that is mounted, like a USB key, using the FUSE interface. This allows any user to do the mount—you don't need to be root. Because gocryptfs encrypts at the file level, synchronization operations that copy your files can work efficiently on each file.


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How to plan your next IT career move

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Being part of technology-oriented communities has been an essential part of my career development. The first community that made a difference for me was focused on virtualization. Less than a year into my first career-related job, I met a group of friends who were significant contributors to this "vCommunity," and I found their enthusiasm to be contagious. That began our daily "nerd herd," where a handful of us met nearly every day for coffee before our shifts in tech support.


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Designing open audio hardware as DIY kits

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Previously in this series about people who are developing audio technology in the open, I interviewed Juan Rios, developer and maintainer of Guayadeque and Sander Jansen, developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager. These conversations have broadened my thinking and helped me enjoy their software even more than before.


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Happy anniversary GNOME: What's your favorite version?

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:03:00 AM

Today is the 22nd anniversary of the first GNOME release. To celebrate, we want to hear from you. What's your favorite GNOME version? And what does your favorite version say about you? Are you change-averse or are you a pioneer of new releases? Take our poll!


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How to record screencasts in GNOME 3

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

GNOME is a free and open source desktop environment used by most GNU/Linux distributions like Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu. It's designed to "get things done with ease, comfort, and control."


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How to create a vanity Tor .onion web address

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Tor is a powerful, open source network that enables anonymous and non-trackable (or difficult to track) browsing of the internet. It's able to achieve this because of users running Tor nodes, which serve as intentional detours between two otherwise direct paths. For instance, if you are in New Zealand and visit python.nz, instead of being routed next door to the data center running python.nz, your traffic might be routed to Pittsburgh and then Berlin and then Vanuatu and finally to python.nz.


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12 extensions for your GNOME desktop

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

The GNOME desktop is the default graphical user interface for most of the popular Linux distributions and some of the BSD and Solaris operating systems. Currently at version 3, GNOME provides a sleek user experience, and extensions are available for additional functionality.


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9 open source cloud native projects to consider

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

As the practice of developing applications with containers is getting more popular, cloud-native applications are also on the rise. By definition:

"Cloud-native technologies are used to develop applications built with services packaged in containers, deployed as microservices, and managed on elastic infrastructure through agile DevOps processes and continuous delivery workflows."


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4 misconceptions about ethics and bias in AI

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

At PyBay 2019 in August, I will continue a conversation I started at PyBay 2018 about the importance of ethics in the artificial intelligence (AI) we're developing, especially as it gains more and more influence in our everyday lives. In last year's keynote, I dug into how we're overlooking the essential role humans play in AI's future.


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How to install Python on Windows

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

So you want to learn to program? One of the most common languages to start with is Python, popular for its unique blend of object-oriented structure and simple syntax. Python is also an interpreted language, meaning you don't need to learn how to compile code into machine language: Python does that for you, allowing you to test your programs sometimes instantly and, in a way, while you write your code.


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Building a non-breaking breakpoint for Python debugging

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:12:00 AM

This is the story of how our team at Rookout built non-breaking breakpoints for Python and some of the lessons we learned along the way. I'll be presenting all about the nuts and bolts of debugging in Python at PyBay 2019 in San Francisco this month. Let's dig in.

The heart of Python debugging: sys.set_trace

There are many Python debuggers out there. Some of the more popular include:


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To equip tomorrow's cybersecurity experts, we'll need an open approach

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Today's world—marked by an increase of Internet-connected devices, digital assets, and information systems infrastructure—demands more cybersecurity professionals. Cybersecurity is the practice of defending these devices, assets, and systems against malicious cyberattacks from both internal and external entities. Often these cyberattacks are linked to cybercrimes, or crimes committed using a computer to generate profit or to affect the integrity, availability, and confidentiality of the data or system.


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A comprehensive guide to agile project management

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

With a focus on continuous improvements, agile project management upends the traditional linear way of developing products and services. Increasingly, organizations are adopting agile project management because it utilizes a series of shorter development cycles to deliver features and improve continually. This management style allows for rapid development, continuous integration (CI), and continuous delivery (CD).


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Apache Hive vs. Apache HBase: Which is the query performance champion?

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

It's super easy to get lost in the world of big data technologies. There are so many of them that it seems a day never passes without the advent of a new one. Still, such fast development is only half the trouble. The real problem is that it's difficult to understand the functionality and the intended use of the existing technologies.


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Cloud-native Java, open source security, and more industry trends

Monday 12th of August 2019 04:25:00 PM

As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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How Hexdump works

Monday 12th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Hexdump is a utility that displays the contents of binary files in hexadecimal, decimal, octal, or ASCII. It’s a utility for inspection and can be used for data recovery, reverse engineering, and programming.


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What open source is not

Monday 12th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

From its early days, the availability of source code was one of the defining characteristics of open source software. Indeed, Brian Behlendorf of the Apache web server project, an early open source software success, favored "source code available software."


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Poll: Where is your coding happy place?

Monday 12th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Your environment is everything, especially when you're coding. Decisions about what text editor or IDE you'll be using are critical to productivity. But what about your environment beyond the screen?


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More in Tux Machines

MX-19 Release Candidate 1 now available

We are pleased to offer MX-19 RC 1 for testing purposes. As usual, this iso includes the latest updates from debian 10.1 (buster), antiX and MX repos. Read more

The Linux Mint 19.2 Gaming Report: Promising But Room For Improvement

When I started outlining the original Linux Gaming Report, I was still a fresh-faced Linux noob. I didn’t understand how fast the ecosystem advanced (particularly graphics drivers and Steam Proton development), and I set some lofty goals that I couldn’t accomplish given my schedule. Before I even got around to testing Ubuntu 18.10, for example, Ubuntu 19.04 was just around the corner! And since all the evaluation and benchmarking takes a considerable amount of time, I ended up well behind the curve. So I’ve streamlined the process a bit, while adding additional checkpoints such as out-of-the-box software availability and ease-of-installation for important gaming apps like Lutris and GameHub. Read more

Something exciting is coming with Ubuntu 19.10

ZFS is a combined file system and logical volume manager that is scalable, supplying support for high storage capacity and a more efficient data compression, and includes snapshots and rollbacks, copy-on-write clones, continuous integrity checking, automatic repair, and much more. So yeah, ZFS is a big deal, which includes some really great features. But out of those supported features, it's the snapshots and rollbacks that should have every Ubuntu user/admin overcome with a case of the feels. Why? Imagine something has gone wrong. You've lost data or an installation of a piece of software has messed up the system. What do you do? If you have ZFS and you've created a snapshot, you can roll that system back to the snapshot where everything was working fine. Although the concept isn't new to the world of computing, it's certainly not something Ubuntu has had by default. So this is big news. Read more

Pack Your Bags – Systemd Is Taking You To A New Home

Home directories have been a fundamental part on any Unixy system since day one. They’re such a basic element, we usually don’t give them much thought. And why would we? From a low level point of view, whatever location $HOME is pointing to, is a directory just like any other of the countless ones you will find on the system — apart from maybe being located on its own disk partition. Home directories are so unspectacular in their nature, it wouldn’t usually cross anyone’s mind to even consider to change anything about them. And then there’s Lennart Poettering. In case you’re not familiar with the name, he is the main developer behind the systemd init system, which has nowadays been adopted by the majority of Linux distributions as replacement for its oldschool, Unix-style init-system predecessors, essentially changing everything we knew about the system boot process. Not only did this change personally insult every single Perl-loving, Ken-Thompson-action-figure-owning grey beard, it engendered contempt towards systemd and Lennart himself that approaches Nickelback level. At this point, it probably doesn’t matter anymore what he does next, haters gonna hate. So who better than him to disrupt everything we know about home directories? Where you _live_? Although, home directories are just one part of the equation that his latest creation — the systemd-homed project — is going to make people hate him even more tackle. The big picture is really more about the whole concept of user management as we know it, which sounds bold and scary, but which in its current state is also a lot more flawed than we might realize. So let’s have a look at what it’s all about, the motivation behind homed, the problems it’s going to both solve and raise, and how it’s maybe time to leave some outdated philosophies behind us. Read more