Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 3 hours 55 sec ago

Explore the past, present, and future of Python on Command-Line Heroes

Tuesday 25th of June 2019 07:03:00 AM

A new season of the podcast Command Line Heroes launched today. I've grown to enjoy this series for both its deep storytelling and its excellent host, Saron Yitbarek. They also dive into fantastic themes, and this year is all about programming languages. 


read more

5 tiny Linux distros to try before you die

Tuesday 25th of June 2019 07:01:00 AM

There are plenty of Linux distributions out there to choose from when you're deciding what to run on a daily basis, yet some are so small that they get little notice. But tiny Linux distributions are powerful innovations: having an entire operating system drive a computer with less than 1GB of storage and half as much RAM is the ultimate software hack.

Tiny distros have many uses, such as:


read more

The innovation delusion

Tuesday 25th of June 2019 07:00:00 AM

If traditional planning is dead, then why do so many organizations still invest in planning techniques optimized for the Industrial Revolution?

One reason might be that we trick ourselves into thinking innovation is the kind of thing we can accomplish with a structured, linear process. When we do this, I think we're confusing our stories about innovation with the process of innovation itself—and the two are very different.


read more

Check your password security with Have I Been Pwned? and pass

Monday 24th of June 2019 07:01:00 AM

Password security involves a broad set of practices, and not all of them are appropriate or possible for everyone. Therefore, the best strategy is to develop a threat model by thinking through your most significant risks—who and what you are protecting against—then model your security approach on the activities that are most effective against those specific threats. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has a great series on threat modeling that I encourage everyone to read.


read more

What are you working on this summer?

Monday 24th of June 2019 07:00:00 AM

Do you have a summer goal? Do longer days allow you to finally carve out time to work on a certain passion project? Will you be spending time AFK (away from keyboard) to enjoy no-code hobbies or volunteer? Are you traveling to any conferences or taking a family vacation? If you're still looking for inspiration, read what our writers had to say:

"Getting some sleep. :-)" —Mike Bursell

"Learning Python and coming up with cool ways I can use it to support ChickTech Austin." —Nicole Baratta

"Finishing up an electric motorcycle conversion." —DJ Delorie


read more

Raspberry Pi 4 is here!

Monday 24th of June 2019 06:00:00 AM

The latest version of the Raspberry Pi—Raspberry Pi 4—was released today, earlier than anticipated, featuring a new 1.5GHz Arm chip and VideoCore GPU with some brand new additions: dual-HDMI 4K display output; USB3 ports; Gigabit Ethernet; and multiple RAM options up to 4GB.


read more

Cloudflare's random number generator, robotics data visualization, npm token scanning, and more news

Saturday 22nd of June 2019 07:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look Cloudflare's open source random number generator, more open source robotics data, new npm functionality, and more!


read more

Why this developer wrote a quick and responsive music player

Friday 21st of June 2019 07:02:00 AM

I wrote recently that "GogglesMM has been one of my favorite players for quite some time now." So, when I was thinking about interviewing developers who build and maintain open source music players, Sander Jansen came quickly to mind.


read more

7 infrastructure performance and scaling tools you should be using

Friday 21st of June 2019 07:01:00 AM

Sysadmins, site reliability engineers (SREs), and cloud operators all too often struggle to feel confident in their infrastructure as it scales up. Also too often, they think the only way to solve their challenges is to write a tool for in-house use. Fortunately, there are options. There are many open source tools available to test an infrastructure's performance. Here are my favorites.


read more

The state of open source translation tools for contributors to your project

Friday 21st of June 2019 07:00:00 AM

In the world of free software, many people speak English: It is the one language. English helps us cross borders to meet others. However, this language is also a barrier for the majority of people.

Some master it while others don't. Complex English terms are, in general, a barrier to the understanding and propagation of knowledge. Whenever you use an uncommon English word, ask yourself about your real mastery of what you are explaining, and the unintentional barriers you build in the process.


read more

How to SSH into a running container

Thursday 20th of June 2019 07:03:00 AM

Containers have shifted the way we think about virtualization. You may remember the days (or you may still be living them) when a virtual machine was the full stack, from virtualized BIOS, operating system, and kernel up to each virtualized network interface controller (NIC). You logged into the virtual box just as you would your own workstation. It was a very direct and simple analogy.


read more

You can't buy DevOps

Thursday 20th of June 2019 07:02:00 AM

How to use OpenSSL: Hashes, digital signatures, and more

Thursday 20th of June 2019 07:00:00 AM

The first article in this series introduced hashes, encryption/decryption, digital signatures, and digital certificates through the OpenSSL libraries and command-line utilities. This second article drills down into the details. Let’s begin with hashes, which are ubiquitous in computing, and consider what makes a hash function cryptographic.


read more

Codethink open sources part of onboarding process

Wednesday 19th of June 2019 07:02:00 AM

Here at Codethink, we’ve recently focused our energy into enhancing the onboarding process we use for all new starters at the company. As we grow steadily in size, it’s important that we have a well-defined approach to both welcoming new employees into the company, and introducing them to the organization’s culture.


read more

Getting started with OpenSSL: Cryptography basics

Wednesday 19th of June 2019 07:01:00 AM

This article is the first of two on cryptography basics using OpenSSL, a production-grade library and toolkit popular on Linux and other systems. (To install the most recent version of OpenSSL, see here.) OpenSSL utilities are available at the command line, and programs can call functions from the OpenSSL libraries. The sample program for this article is in C, the source language for the OpenSSL libraries.


read more

Leading in the Python community

Wednesday 19th of June 2019 07:00:00 AM

Like many other leaders in the open source software world, Naomi Ceder, board chair of the Python Software Foundation (PSF), took a non-traditional path into the Python world. As the title of her 2017 keynote at PyCon España explains, she came for the language and stayed for the community.


read more

How to use MapTool to build an interactive dungeon RPG

Tuesday 18th of June 2019 07:02:00 AM

In my previous article on MapTool, I explained how to download, install, and configure your own private, open source virtual tabletop so you and your friends can play a role-playing game (RPG) together. MapTool is a complex application with lots of features, and this article demonstrates how a game master (GM) can make the most of it.


read more

A beginner's guide to Linux permissions

Tuesday 18th of June 2019 07:01:00 AM

One of the main benefits of Linux systems is that they are known to be less prone to security vulnerabilities and exploits than other systems. Linux definitely gives users more flexibility and granular controls over its file systems' security permissions. This may imply that it's critical for Linux users to understand security permissions. That isn't necessarily true, but it's still wise for beginning users to understand the basics of Linux permissions. 


read more

Why your workplace arguments aren't as effective as you'd like

Tuesday 18th of June 2019 07:00:00 AM

Transparent, frank, and often contentious arguments are part of life in an open organization. But how can we be sure those conversations are productive—not destructive?


read more

5 transferable higher-education skills

Monday 17th of June 2019 07:49:00 AM

My transition from a higher-education professional into the tech realm was comparable to moving from a pond into an ocean. There was so much to learn, and after learning, there was still so much more to learn!

Rather than going down the rabbit hole and being overwhelmed by what I did not know, in the last two to three months, I have been able to take comfort in the realization that I was not entirely out of my element as a developer. The skills I acquired during my six years as a university professional gave me the foundation to be successful in the developer role.


read more

More in Tux Machines

Late Coverage of Confidential Computing Consortium

  • Microsoft Partners With Google, Intel, And Others To Form Data Protection Consortium

    The software maker joined Google Cloud, Intel, IBM, Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Red Hat, Swisscom, and Tencent to establish the Confidential Computing Consortium, a group committed to providing better private data protection, promoting the use of confidential computing, and advancing open source standards among members of the technology community.

  • #OSSUMMIT: Confidential Computing Consortium Takes Shape to Enable Secure Collaboration

    At the Open Source Summit in San Diego, California on August 21, the Linux Foundation announced the formation of the Confidential Computing Consortium. Confidential computing is an approach using encrypted data that enables organizations to share and collaborate, while still maintaining privacy. Among the initial backers of the effort are Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent. “The context of confidential computing is that we can actually use the data encrypted while programs are working on it,” John Gossman, distinguished engineer at Microsoft, said during a keynote presentation announcing the new effort. Initially there are three projects that are part of the Confidential Computing Consortium, with an expectation that more will be added over time. Microsoft has contributed its Open Enclave SDK, Red Hat is contributing the Enarx project for Trusted Execution Environments and Intel is contributing its Software Guard Extensions (SGX) software development kit. Lorie Wigle, general manager, platform security product management at Intel, explained that Intel has had a capability built into some of its processors called software guard which essentially provides a hardware-based capability for protecting an area of memory.

Graphics: Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver and SPIR-V Support For OpenGL 4.6

  • Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver Sees ~30% Performance Boost For APUs

    Mesa's RADV Radeon Vulkan driver just saw a big performance optimization land to benefit APUs like Raven Ridge and Picasso, simply systems with no dedicated video memory. The change by Feral's Alex Smith puts the uncached GTT type at a higher index than the visible vRAM type for these configurations without dedicated vRAM, namely APUs.

  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Is Close With SPIR-V Support For OpenGL 4.6

    This week saw OpenGL 4.6 support finally merged for Intel's i965 Mesa driver and will be part of the upcoming Mesa 19.2 release. Not landed yet but coming soon is the newer Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver also seeing OpenGL 4.6 support. Iris Gallium3D has been at OpenGL 4.5 support and is quite near as well with its OpenGL 4.6 support thanks to the shared NIR support and more with the rest of the Intel open-source graphics stack. Though it's looking less likely that OpenGL 4.6 support would be back-ported to Mesa 19.2 for Iris, but we'll see.

The GPD MicroPC in 3 Minutes [Video Review]

In it I tackle the GPD MicroPC with Ubuntu MATE 19.10. I touch on the same points made in my full text review, but with the added bonus of moving images to illustrate my points, rather than words. Read more Also: WiringPi - Deprecated

today's howtos