Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 2 hours 22 min ago

4 tech jobs for people who don't code

Wednesday 17th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

In the first article in this series, I explained how the tech industry divides people and roles into "technical" or "non-technical" categories and the problems associated with this. The tech industry makes it difficult for people interested in tech—but not coding—to figure out where they fit in and what they can do.


read more

How to install Linux in 3 steps

Tuesday 16th of February 2021 08:02:00 AM

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different reasons to use Linux. Here's how to install Linux. 


read more

How Ansible got started and grew

Tuesday 16th of February 2021 08:02:00 AM

Recently, Flagsmith founder Ben Rometsch spoke to Michael DeHaan, founder of open source IT automation software Ansible (now part of IBM/Red Hat), on The Craft of Open Source podcast about how he developed Ansible and what he's been doing since.


read more

What does being 'technical' mean?

Tuesday 16th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

The word "technical" describes many subjects and disciplines: technical knock-out, technical foul, technical courses for rock-climbing competitions, and technical scores for figure skating in sports. The popular cooking show The Great British Bake-Off includes a technical baking challenge. Anybody who has participated in the theatre may be familiar with technical week, the week before the opening night of play or musical.


read more

Why everyone should try using Linux

Monday 15th of February 2021 08:02:00 AM

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different reasons to use Linux. Let's explore why anyone can try Linux.


read more

Protect your Home Assistant with these backups

Monday 15th of February 2021 08:01:00 AM

In the last two articles in this series on home automation with Home Assistant (HA), I walked through setting up a few integrations with a Zigbee Bridge and some custom ESP8266 devices that I use for automation.


read more

A practical guide to JavaScript closures

Monday 15th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

In 4 reasons why JavaScript is so popular, I touched on a few advanced JavaScript concepts. In this article, I will dive into one of them: closures.


read more

Give something from the heart to the public domain

Sunday 14th of February 2021 08:01:00 AM

Did you know that most of the articles published on Opensource.com are licensed under Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0?

One of the biggest reasons our editorial team decided on this license over 10 years ago is because we support the idea that the best content is shared content. As we strive to be open, our goal is for any many people as possible to have access to the information we're putting out there to support our mission to help others learn and grow and to explore new open source worlds.


read more

Why programmers love Linux packaging

Sunday 14th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different reasons to use Linux. Today, I'll talk about what makes packaging for Linux ideal for programmers.


read more

5 reasons why I love coding on Linux

Saturday 13th of February 2021 08:01:00 AM

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different ways to use Linux. Here I'll explain why so many programmers choose Linux.


read more

How open source provides students with real-world experience

Saturday 13th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

In the movie The Secret of My Success, Brantley Foster (played by Michael J. Fox) expresses the exact thought that goes through every new graduate's mind: "How can I get any experience until I get a job that gives me experience?"

The hardest thing to do when starting a new career is to get experience. Often this creates a paradox. How do you get work with no experience, and how do you get experience with no work?


read more

4 reasons to choose Linux for art and design

Friday 12th of February 2021 08:02:00 AM

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different reasons to use Linux. Today I'll explain why Linux is an excellent choice for creative work.


read more

How the OpenStack community is collaborating during the pandemic

Friday 12th of February 2021 08:01:00 AM

The OpenStack community is BIG. From Argentina to Morocco to Israel to Vietnam, we literally span the globe, so it's not surprising that we largely knew what to do to accommodate COVID-19's circumstances. But it still has been a struggle to keep moving forward and adapt while still delivering Ussuri and Victoria, the 21st and 22nd releases of OpenStack.


read more

18 ways to differentiate open source products from upstream suppliers

Friday 12th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

In the first three parts of this series, I explored open source as a supply chain, what a product is, and what product managers do. In this fourth article, I'll look at a plethora of methods to differentiate open source software products from their upstream open source projects.


read more

How to adopt DevSecOps successfully

Friday 12th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

Adopting DevOps can help an organization transform and speed how its software is delivered, tested, and deployed to production. This is the well-known "DevOps promise" that has led to such a large surge in adoption.


read more

Use Linux to do your taxes

Thursday 11th of February 2021 08:02:00 AM

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different reasons to use Linux. Here's how to use Linux to do your taxes.


read more

31 open source text editors you need to try

Thursday 11th of February 2021 08:01:00 AM

Computers are text-based, so the more things you do with them, the more you find yourself needing a text-editing application. And the more time you spend in a text editor, the more likely you are to demand more from whatever you use.

If you're looking for a good text editor, you'll find that Linux has plenty to offer. Whether you want to work in the terminal, on your desktop, or in the cloud, you can literally try a different editor every day for a month (or one a month for almost three years) in your relentless search for the perfect typing experience.


read more

What's new with ownCloud in 2021?

Thursday 11th of February 2021 08:00:00 AM

The newest version of ownCloud, ownCloud Infinite Scale (OCIS), is a complete rewrite of the venerable open source enterprise file sharing and syncing software stack. It features a new backend written in Go, a frontend in Vue.js, and many changes, including eliminating the need for a database. This scalable, modular approach replaces ownCloud's PHP, database, and POSIX filesystem and promises up to 10 times better performance.


read more

Manage your budget on Linux with this open source finance tool

Wednesday 10th of February 2021 08:02:00 AM

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different reasons to use Linux. This article is about personal financial management.


read more

Configure multi-tenancy with Kubernetes namespaces

Wednesday 10th of February 2021 08:01:00 AM

Most enterprises want a multi-tenancy platform to run their cloud-native applications because it helps manage resources, costs, and operational efficiency and control cloud waste.


read more

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's howtos

  • Hans de Goede: Changing hidden/locked BIOS settings under Linux

    This all started with a Mele PCG09 before testing Linux on this I took a quick look under Windows and the device-manager there showed an exclamation mark next to a Realtek 8723BS bluetooth device, so BT did not work. Under Linux I quickly found out why, the device actually uses a Broadcom Wifi/BT chipset attached over SDIO/an UART for the Wifi resp. BT parts. The UART connected BT part was described in the ACPI tables with a HID (Hardware-ID) of "OBDA8723", not good. Now I could have easily fixed this with an extra initrd with DSDT-overrride but that did not feel right. There was an option in the BIOS which actually controls what HID gets advertised for the Wifi/BT named "WIFI" which was set to "RTL8723" which obviously is wrong, but that option was grayed out. So instead of going for the DSDT-override I really want to be able to change that BIOS option and set it to the right value. Some duckduckgo-ing found this blogpost on changing locked BIOS settings.

  • Test Day:2021-05-09 Kernel 5.12.2 on Fedora 34

    All logs report PASSED for each test done and uploaded as prompted at instruction page.

  • James Hunt: Can you handle an argument?

    This post explores some of the darker corners of command-line parsing that some may be unaware of. [...] No, I’m not questioning your debating skills, I’m referring to parsing command-lines! Parsing command-line option is something most programmers need to deal with at some point. Every language of note provides some sort of facility for handling command-line options. All a programmer needs to do is skim read the docs or grab the sample code, tweak to taste, et voila! But is it that simple? Do you really understand what is going on? I would suggest that most programmers really don’t think that much about it. Handling the parsing of command-line options is just something you bolt on to your codebase. And then you move onto the more interesting stuff. Yes, it really does tend to be that easy and everything just works… most of the time. Most? I hit an interesting issue recently which expanded in scope somewhat. It might raise an eyebrow for some or be a minor bomb-shell for others.

  • 10 Very Stupid Linux Commands [ Some Of Them Deadly ]

    If you are reading this page then you are like all of us a Linux fan, also you are using the command line every day and absolutely love Linux. But even in love and marriage there are things that make you just a little bit annoyed. Here in this article we are going to show you some of the most stupid Linux commands that a person can find.

China Is Launching A New Alternative To Google Summer of Code, Outreachy

The Institute of Software Chinese Academy of Sciences (ISCAS) in cooperation with the Chinese openEuler Linux distribution have been working on their own project akin to Google Summer of Code and Outreachy for paying university-aged students to become involved in open-source software development. "Summer 2021" as the initiative is simply called or "Summer 2021 of Open Source Promotion Plan" is providing university-aged students around the world funding by the Institute of Software Chinese Academy of Sciences to work on community open-source projects. It's just like Google Summer of Code but with offering different funding levels based upon the complexity of the project -- funding options are 12000 RMB, 9000 RMB, or 6000 RMB. That's roughly $932 to $1,865 USD for students to devote their summer to working on open-source. There are not any gender/nationality restrictions with this initative but students must be at least eighteen years old. Read more

Kernel: Linux 5.10 and Linux 5.13

  • Linux 5.10 LTS Will Be Maintained Through End Of Year 2026 - Phoronix

    Linux 5.10 as the latest Long Term Support release when announced was only going to be maintained until the end of 2022 but following enough companies stepping up to help with testing, Linux 5.10 LTS will now be maintained until the end of year 2026. Linux 5.10 LTS was originally just going to be maintained until the end of next year while prior kernels like Linux 5.4 LTS are being maintained until 2024 or even Linux 4.19 LTS and 4.14 LTS going into 2024. Linux 5.10 LTS was short to begin with due to the limited number of developers/organizations helping to test new point release candidates and/or committing resources to using this kernel LTS series. But now there are enough participants committing to it that Greg Kroah-Hartman confirmed he along with Sasha Levin will maintain the kernel through December 2026.

  • Oracle Continues Working On The Maple Tree For The Linux Kernel

    Oracle engineers have continued working on the "Maple Tree" data structure for the Linux kernel as an RCU-safe, range-based B-tree designed to make efficient use of modern processor caches. Sent out last year was the RFC patch series of Maple Tree for the Linux kernel to introduce this new data structure and make initial use of it. Sent out last week was the latest 94 patches in a post-RFC state for introducing this data structure.

  • Linux 5.13 Brings Simplified Retpolines Handling - Phoronix

    In addition to work like Linux 5.13 addressing some network overhead caused by Retpolines, this next kernel's return trampoline implementation itself is seeing a simplification. Merged as part of x86/core last week for the Linux 5.13 kernel were enabling PPIN support for Xeon Sapphire Rapids, KProbes improvements, and other minor changes plus simplifying the Retpolines implementation used by some CPUs as part of the Spectre V2 mitigations. The x86/core pull request for Linux 5.13 also re-sorts and better documents Intel's increasingly long list of different CPU cores/models.

  • Linux 5.13 Adds Support For SPI NOR One-Time Programmable Memory Regions - Phoronix

    The Linux 5.13 kernel has initial support for dealing with SPI one-time programmable (OTP) flash memory regions. Linux 5.13 adds the new MTD OTP functions for accessing SPI one-time programmable data. The OTP are memory regions intended to be programmed once and can be used for permanent secure identification, immutable properties, and similar purposes. In addition to adding the core infrastructure support for OTP to the MTD SPI-NOR code in Linux 5.13, the functionality is wired up for Winbond and similar flash memory chips. The MTD subsystem has already supported OTP areas but not for SPI-NOR flash memory.