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Updated: 32 min 12 sec ago

Happy birthday to the Linux kernel: What's your favorite release?

Sunday 25th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Let's take a trip back to August 1991, when history was in the making. The tech world faced many pivotal moments that continue to impact us today. An intriguing project called the World Wide Web was announced by Tim Berners-Lee and the first website was launched. Super Nintendo was released in the United States and a new chapter of gaming began for kids of all ages. At the University of Helsinki, a student named Linus Torvalds asked his peers for feedback on a new free operating system he had been developing as a hobby. It was then that the Linux kernel was born.


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How to compile a Linux kernel in the 21st century

Saturday 24th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

In computing, a kernel is the low-level software that handles communication with hardware and general system coordination. Aside from some initial firmware built into your computer's motherboard, when you start your computer, the kernel is what provides awareness that it has a hard drive and a screen and a keyboard and a network card. It's also the kernel's job to ensure equal time (more or less) is given to each component so that your graphics and audio and filesystem and network all run smoothly, even though they're running concurrently.


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How UCLA Library preserves rare objects with open source

Saturday 24th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

The University of California, Los Angeles, (UCLA) Library houses a collection of millions of rare and unique objects, including materials dating from 3000 BCE, that could be damaged, destroyed, or otherwise threatened if they were displayed.

To make these special collections widely available while keeping them secure, the UCLA Library has been modernizing its digital repository, which was established 15 years ago on now-outdated software.


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The Linux kernel: Top 5 innovations

Friday 23rd of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

The word innovation gets bandied about in the tech industry almost as much as revolution, so it can be difficult to differentiate hyperbole from something that’s actually exciting. The Linux kernel has been called innovative, but then again it’s also been called the biggest hack in modern computing, a monolith in a micro world.

Setting aside marketing and modeling, Linux is arguably the most popular kernel of the open source world, and it’s introduced some real game-changers over its nearly 30-year life span.


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Dive into the life and legacy of Alan Turing: 5 books and more

Friday 23rd of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Recently, Bank of England Governor, Mark Carney, announced that Alan Turning would be the new face on the UK£ 50 note.


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The lifecycle of Linux kernel testing

Friday 23rd of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

In Continuous integration testing for the Linux kernel, I wrote about the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) project and its mission to change how kernel developers and maintainers work. This article is a deep dive into some of the more technical aspects of the project and how all the pieces fit together.


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How the Linux desktop has grown

Thursday 22nd of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

I first installed Linux in 1993. At that time, you really didn't have many options for installing the operating system. In those early days, many people simply copied a running image from someone else. Then someone had the neat idea to create a "distribution" of Linux that let you customize what software you wanted to install. That was the Softlanding Linux System (SLS) and my first introduction to Linux.


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How to move a file in Linux

Thursday 22nd of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Moving files in Linux can seem relatively straightforward, but there are more options available than most realize. This article teaches beginners how to move files in the GUI and on the command line, but also explains what’s actually happening under the hood, and addresses command line options that many experience users have rarely explored.


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What piece of advice had the greatest impact on your career in DevOps?

Thursday 22nd of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

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Build a distributed NoSQL database with Apache Cassandra

Wednesday 21st of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Recently, I got a rush request to get a three-node Apache Cassandra cluster with a replication factor of two working for a development job. I had little idea what that meant but needed to figure it out quickly—a typical day in a sysadmin's job.

Here's how to set up a basic three-node Cassandra cluster from scratch with some extra bits for replication and future node expansion.


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5 notable open source 3D printers

Wednesday 21st of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Open source hardware and 3D printers go together like, well, open source hardware and 3D printers. Not only are 3D printers used to create all sorts of open source hardware—there are also a huge number of 3D printers that have been certified as open source by the Open Source Hardware Association. That fact means that they are freely available to improve and build upon.


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Open Policy Agent: Cloud-native security and compliance

Wednesday 21st of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Every product or service has a unique way of handling policy and authorization: who-can-do-what and what-can-do-what. In the cloud-native world, authorization and policy are more complex than ever before. As the cloud-native ecosystem evolves, there’s a growing need for DevOps and DevSecOps teams to identify and address security and compliance issues earlier in development and deployment cycles. Businesses need to release software on the order of minutes (instead of months).


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Serverless on Kubernetes, diverse automation, and more industry trends

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 03:00:00 PM

As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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The cloud isn't killing open source software

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Over the last few months, I participated in two keynote panels where people asked questions about open source licensing:

  • Do we need to redefine what open source means in the age of the cloud?
  • Are cloud vendors abusing open source?
  • Will open source, as we know it, survive?

Last year was the most eventful in my memory for the usually very conservative open source licensing space:


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A project manager's guide to Ansible

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

From application deployment to provisioning, Ansible is a powerful open source tool for automating routine IT tasks. It can help an organization's IT run smoothly, with core IT processes networked and maintained. Ansible is an advanced IT orchestration solution, and it can be deployed even over a large, complex network infrastructure.


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The infrastructure is code: A story of COBOL and Go

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Old challenges are new again. In this week's Command Line Heroes podcast (Season 3, Episode 5), that thought comes with a twist of programming languages and platforms.


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A brief introduction to learning agility

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

I think everyone can agree that the workplace has changed dramatically in the last decade—or is in the process of changing, depending on where you're currently working. The landscape has evolved. Distributed leadership, project-based work models, and cross-functional solution building are commonplace. In essence, the world is going open.


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An introduction to bpftrace for Linux

Monday 19th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Bpftrace is a new open source tracer for Linux for analyzing production performance problems and troubleshooting software. Its users and contributors include Netflix, Facebook, Red Hat, Shopify, and others, and it was created by Alastair Robertson, a talented UK-based developer who has won various coding competitions.


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Moving files on Linux without mv

Monday 19th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

The humble mv command is one of those useful tools you find on every POSIX box you encounter. Its job is clearly defined, and it does it well: Move a file from one place in a file system to another. But Linux is nothing if not flexible, and there are other options for moving files. Using different tools can provide small advantages that fit perfectly with a specific use case.

Before straying too far from mv, take a look at this command’s default results. First, create a directory and generate some files with permissions set to 777:


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WebAssembly for speed and code reuse

Monday 19th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Imagine translating a non-web application, written in a high-level language, into a binary module ready for the web. This translation could be done without any change whatsoever to the non-web application's source code. A browser can download the newly translated module efficiently and execute the module in the sandbox. The executing web module can interact seamlessly with other web technologies—with JavaScript (JS) in particular. Welcome to WebAssembly.


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More in Tux Machines

Devices Leftovers

  • Khadas VIM3L (Amlogic S905D3) Benchmarks, Settings & System Info

    Khadas VIM3L is the first Amlogic S905D3 SBC on the market and is sold as a lower-cost alternative to the company’s VIM3 board with a focus on the HTPC / media player market.

  • Semtech SX1302 LoRa Transceiver to Deliver Cheaper, More Efficient Gateways
  • In-vehicle computer supports new MaaS stack

    Axiomtek’s fanless, rugged “UST100-504-FL” automotive PC runs Ubuntu 18.04 or Windows on 6th or 7th Gen Intel chips, and offers SATA, HDMI, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 3x mini-PCIe, a slide-rail design, and the new AMS/AXView for MaaS discovery. Axiomtek announced a rugged in-vehicle PC that runs Ubuntu 18.04, Windows 10, or Windows 7 on Intel’s Skylake or Kaby Lake processors. The UST100-504-FL is aimed at “in-vehicle edge computing and video analytics applications,” and is especially suited for police and emergency vehicles, says Axiomtek. There’s also a new Agent MaaS Suite (AMS) IoT management suite available (see farther below).

  • Google Launches the Pixel 4 with Android 10, Astrophotography, and Motion Sense

    Google officially launched today the long rumored and leaked Pixel 4 smartphone, a much-needed upgrade to the Pixel 3 and 3a series with numerous enhancements and new features. The Pixel 4 smartphone is finally here, boasting upgraded camera with astrophotography capabilities so you can shoot the night sky and Milky Way without using a professional camera, a feature that will also be ported to the Pixel 3 and 3a devices with the latest camera app update, as well as Live HDR+ support for outstanding photo quality.

  • Repurposing A Toy Computer From The 1990s

    Our more youthful readers are fairly likely to have owned some incarnation of a VTech educational computer. From the mid-1980s and right up to the present day, VTech has been producing vaguely laptop shaped gadgets aimed at teaching everything from basic reading skills all the way up to world history. Hallmarks of these devices include a miserable monochrome LCD, and unpleasant membrane keyboard, and as [HotKey] found, occasionally a proper Z80 processor. [...] After more than a year of tinkering and talking to other hackers in the Z80 scene, [HotKey] has made some impressive headway. He’s not only created a custom cartridge that lets him load new code and connect to external devices, but he’s also added support for a few VTech machines to z88dk so that others can start writing their own C code for these machines. So far he’s created some very promising proof of concept programs such as a MIDI controller and serial terminal, but ultimately he hopes to create a DOS or CP/M like operating system that will elevate these vintage machines from simple toys to legitimate multi-purpose computers.

today's howtos

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: FLOSS Weekly, Containers, Linux Headlines, Arch Linux Openbox Build and GhostBSD 19.09

  • FLOSS Weekly 551: Kamailio

    Kamailio is an Open Source SIP Server released under GPL, able to handle thousands of call setups per second. Kamailio can be used to build large platforms for VoIP and realtime communications – presence, WebRTC, Instant messaging and other applications.

  • What is a Container? | Jupiter Extras 23

    Containers changed the way the IT world deploys software. We give you our take on technologies such as docker (including docker-compose), Kubernetes and highlight a few of our favorite containers.

  • 2019-10-16 | Linux Headlines

    WireGuard is kicked out of the Play Store, a new Docker worm is discovered, and Mozilla unveils upcoming changes to Firefox.

  • Showing off my Custom Arch Linux Openbox Build
  • GhostBSD 19.09 - Based on FreeBSD 12.0-STABLE and Using MATE Desktop 1.22

    GhostBSD 19.09 is the latest release of GhostBSD. This release based on FreeBSD 12.0-STABLE while also pulling in TrueOS packages, GhostBSD 19.09 also has an updated OpenRC init system, a lot of unnecessary software was removed, AMDGPU and Radeon KMS is now valid xconfig options and a variety of other improvements and fixes.

MX-19 Release Candidate 1 now available

We are pleased to offer MX-19 RC 1 for testing purposes. As usual, this iso includes the latest updates from debian 10.1 (buster), antiX and MX repos. Read more