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Updated: 3 hours 7 min ago

Does your open source project need a president?

Wednesday 8th of March 2017 08:00:00 AM

Recently I was lucky enough to be invited to attend the Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit. The event was stacked with many of the people I consider mentors, friends, and definitely leaders in the various open source and free software communities that I participate in.


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How to set up a personal web server with a Raspberry Pi

Tuesday 7th of March 2017 08:03:00 AM

A personal web server is "the cloud," except you own and control it as opposed to a large corporation.

Owning a little cloud has a lot of benefits, including customization, free storage, free Internet services, a path into open source software, high-quality security, full control over your content, the ability to make quick changes, a place to experiment with code, and much more. Most of these benefits are immeasurable, but financially these benefits can save you over $100 per month.


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How to make release notes count

Tuesday 7th of March 2017 08:01:00 AM

Congratulations! You're ready to ship the latest release of your software package. Now you need to make sure your release notes are in order. Sure, you could just slap "bug fixes and performance improvements" on the box and call it a day, but that doesn't really tell your users anything.


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Build a smart garden with these 3 DIY Arduino projects

Tuesday 7th of March 2017 08:01:00 AM

With warmer weather around the corner here in the US, it's time for gardeners to start making plans for spring and summer. For the more technically minded among us, it's also a good time to start working on DIY projects that can keep things running smoothly. As it turns out, projects based around the Arduino open hardware development board are an excellent place to start. In this article, I've rounded up three cool Arduino-based projects that take your garden to the next level.


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Working for a mission, not a boss

Tuesday 7th of March 2017 08:00:00 AM

I had a brilliant opportunity to interview Suresh V. Shankar, founder of Crayon, at Slush Singapore 2016. At the conference, he spoke about his experience—and the difficulties he faced—as an entrepreneur. He also talked about how he overcame them.

Suresh sold his previous company, RedPill Solutions, to IBM in 2009. However, his entrepreneurial journey did not end there. He went on to start a new company, Crayon, with the goal of simplifying big data.


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Using proprietary services to develop open source software

Monday 6th of March 2017 08:03:00 AM

It is now pretty well accepted that open source is a superior way of producing software. Almost everyone is doing open source these days. In particular, the ability for users to look under the hood and make changes results in tools that are better adapted to their workflows. It reduces the cost and risk of finding yourself locked in with a vendor in an unbalanced relationship. It contributes to a virtuous circle of continuous improvement, blurring the lines between consumers and producers. It enables everyone to remix and invent new things. It adds up to the common human knowledge.


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GNU Screen or tmux?

Monday 6th of March 2017 08:02:00 AM

If you've spent a fair amount of time working on the command line, chances are you've tried out a terminal multiplexer. These helpful tools let users easily switch between applications in the terminal, save sessions to come back to later, and manage connections to many machines at ones from one location.


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Top 4 JavaScipt code editors

Monday 6th of March 2017 08:01:00 AM

JavaScript is everywhere, and its ubiquitous presence on the web is undeniable. Every app uses it in one form or another. And any developer who is serious about the web should learn JavaScript. If you already know it, be sure to continue learning new frameworks, libraries, and tools, because JavaScript is a living, evolving language.


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Improved container support, PTG recap, and more OpenStack news

Monday 6th of March 2017 06:00:00 AM

Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

OpenStack around the web

From news sites to developer blogs, there's a lot being written about OpenStack every week. Here are a few highlights.


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IKEA's DIY grow room, US DoD launches Code.mil, and more open source news

Saturday 4th of March 2017 08:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at IKEA's spherical garden, the US Department of Defense's Code.mil site, and more.

Open source news roundup for February 19-March 4, 2017
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Top 5: New Raspberry Pi Zero, MySQL 8 preview, and more

Friday 3rd of March 2017 03:25:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we highlight new Raspberry Pi hardware, programming languages for beginners, MySQL 8, and machine learning.

Top 5 articles of the week

5. Pi Zero Wireless out now for $10

Columnist Ben Nuttall introduces a new member of the Raspberry Pi family. The Pi Zero Wireless is the same Pi Zero you've come to love, with WiFi and Bluetooth.


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Node.js: A project for casual contributors

Friday 3rd of March 2017 08:02:00 AM

I sat down at the Open Source Leadership Summit to record a podcast with Mikeal Rogers, who heads the Node.js Foundation, a collaborative project under the Linux Foundation.


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Program LEGO Mindstorms robots over WiFi with BrickPi

Friday 3rd of March 2017 08:01:00 AM

For the past year, I've been teaching students how to build and program robots using the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 platform. From the outset, I wanted to find a way to use Scratch and other open source programming languages to extend the capabilities of the platform. That search led me to BrickPi, a Raspberry Pi add-on board from Dexter Industries that easily interfaces with Mindstorms sensors and motors.


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Using open source APM software: InspectIT

Friday 3rd of March 2017 08:00:00 AM

In modern days, software systems are continuously becoming more complex. At the same time customer's expectations regarding, for example, response times and availability are higher than ever before. As you know, services that perform poorly could drive customers to your competitors' offerings.


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4 open source tools for sharing files

Thursday 2nd of March 2017 08:03:00 AM

There comes a time in your life when you have to share one or more files with someone, whether that someone is a friend, a family member, a colleague or collaborator, or a client. Many people stay true to their open source convictions by doing the job using applications like ownCloudNextcloud, or SparkleShare.


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An introduction to GNU Screen

Thursday 2nd of March 2017 08:02:00 AM

GNU Screen (or just Screen) is a useful and versatile, but somewhat under-appreciated utility that, as part of the GNU project, is included or available in nearly every Linux or UNIX distribution. Screen is a terminal multiplexer, similar to what you would find in a window manager. It is an especially helpful utility if you are restricted to working on a computer or a virtual machine either over an SSH link or through a terminal session on the console.


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3 projects successfully using mesh network technology

Thursday 2nd of March 2017 08:01:00 AM

If you think about it, isn't the Internet just a giant mesh network? If we deviate slightly from the standard definition that requires that all nodes to assist in data distribution, the answer is a resounding yes.

However, traditional network technologies and the vendor-provided hardware required to run them is often far too expensive to deploy without deep pockets. Open source software aims to solve these problems and enable network connectivity to marginalized groups all around the world.


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Why the future of advertising is open

Thursday 2nd of March 2017 08:00:00 AM

Sir Martin Sorrell, perhaps the single most powerful person in the advertising industry, recently said that the "new normal" for the global advertising industry is that of "low growth." I think that is not necessarily true—if we examine the underlying assumptions about the source of growth for the industry.


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More in Tux Machines

Development News

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”

Wine and Games

  • [Wine] Packaging changes
    Today we want to announce some important changes regarding the Wine Staging packages provided at repos.wine-staging.com and dl.winehq.org. We completely reworked our build system to make the packages available sooner after a release and also added some new features, like downloading old packages for Debian / Ubuntu. The complete list of changes can be found in the announcement email on the Wine mailing list.
  • Planescape: Torment Enhanced Edition Announced for PC, Mac, Linux, and Mobile
  • Podcast #6 with Ethan Lee, Porter on Fez, Transistor
    Have you ever played Fez on Linux ? Transistor ? Speed Runners ? Shenzen I/O ? Bastion ? or more recently, Owlboy ? Well if you have, you have benefited from the work of Flibitijibibo who is directly responsible for the port of such titles to your platform.