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Updated: 2 hours 29 min ago

How DevOps professionals can become security champions

Tuesday 24th of September 2019 07:03:00 AM

Security is a misunderstood element in DevOps. Some see it as outside of DevOps' purview, while others find it important (and overlooked) enough to recommend moving to DevSecOps. No matter your perspective on where it belongs, it's clear that security affects everyone.


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A human approach to reskilling in the age of AI

Tuesday 24th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

The age of AI is upon us. Emerging technologies give humans some relief from routine tasks and allow us to get back to the creative, adaptable creatures many of us prefer being.

So a shift to developing human skills in the workplace should be a critical focus for organizations. In this part of my series on learning agility, we'll take a look at some reasons for a sense of urgency over reskilling our workforce and reconnecting to our humanness.


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Introduction to the Linux chgrp and newgrp commands

Monday 23rd of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

In a recent article, I introduced the chown command, which is used for modifying ownership of files on systems. Recall that ownership is the combination of the user and group assigned to an object. The chgrp and newgrp commands provide additional help for managing files that need to maintain group ownership.


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Getting started with data science using Python

Monday 23rd of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

Data science is an exciting new field in computing that's built around analyzing, visualizing, correlating, and interpreting the boundless amounts of information our computers are collecting about the world. Of course, calling it a "new" field is a little disingenuous because the discipline is a derivative of statistics, data analysis, and plain old obsessive scientific observation.


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Mutation testing by example: How to leverage failure

Monday 23rd of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

In my article Mutation testing is the evolution of TDD, I exposed the power of iteration to guarantee a solution when a measurable test is available. In that article, an iterative approach helped to determine how to implement code that calculates the square root of a given number.


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When was the last time you used Windows?

Sunday 22nd of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Are friends and family constantly asking you to troubleshoot issues with their Windows or Mac device? Being the resident support technician in your home is an important job. Like any responsible technology steward, you are going to try your best to help out. However, it might be quite a challenge if it has been a while since you last used such an operating system.

How long has it been since you last used Windows? Before using Linux, were you primarily a Mac user? Or, are you using Windows or Mac now either at home or work?


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How spicy should a jalapeno be?

Saturday 21st of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Everyone has opinions and preferences, especially when it comes to food. To establish a criterion when answering "How spicy should a jalapeño be?." the Scoville Heat Scale was developed as a standard to measure spiciness. This scale allows people to communicate and share information about how spicy we like our peppers.


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Hone advanced Bash skills by building Minesweeper

Friday 20th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

I am no expert on teaching programming, but when I want to get better at something, I try to find a way to have fun with it. For example, when I wanted to get better at shell scripting, I decided to practice by programming a version of the Minesweeper game in Bash.


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How to compare strings in Java

Friday 20th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

String comparison is a fundamental operation in programming and is often quizzed during interviews. These strings are a sequence of characters that are immutable which means unchanging over time or unable to be changed.

Java has a number of methods for comparing strings; this article will teach you the primary operation of how to compare strings in Java.

There are six options:


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Code it, ship it, own it with full-service ownership

Friday 20th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Software teams seeking to provide better products and services must focus on faster release cycles. But running reliable systems at ever-increasing speeds presents a big challenge. Software teams can have both quality and speed by adjusting their policies around ongoing service ownership. While on-call plays a large part in this model, advancement in knowledge, more resilient code, increased collaboration, and better practices mean engineers don't have to wake up to a nightmare.


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Code it, ship it, own it with full-service ownership

Friday 20th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Software teams seeking to provide better products and services must focus on faster release cycles. But running reliable systems at ever-increasing speeds presents a big challenge. Software teams can have both quality and speed by adjusting their policies around ongoing service ownership. While on-call plays a large part in this model, advancement in knowledge, more resilient code, increased collaboration, and better practices mean engineers don't have to wake up to a nightmare.


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Why it's time to embrace top-down cybersecurity practices

Thursday 19th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

Cybersecurity is no longer just the domain of the IT staff putting in firewalls and backing up servers. It takes a commitment from the top and a budget to match. The stakes are high when it comes to keeping your customers' information safe.


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An introduction to audio processing and machine learning using Python

Thursday 19th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

At a high level, any machine learning problem can be divided into three types of tasks: data tasks (data collection, data cleaning, and feature formation), training (building machine learning models using data features), and evaluation (assessing the model). Features, defined as "individual measurable propert[ies] or characteristic[s] of a phenomenon being observed," are very useful because they help a machine understand the data and classify it into categories or predict a value.


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Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

Thursday 19th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z).

According to the Linux on z Systems Wikipedia page:


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Adding themes and plugins to Zsh

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

In my previous article, I explained how to get started with Z-shell (Zsh). For some users, the most exciting thing about Zsh is its ability to adopt new themes. It's so easy to theme Zsh both because of the active community designing visuals for the shell and also because of the Oh My Zsh project, which makes it trivial to install them.


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The community-led renaissance of open source

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

With few commercial participants, early free software and open source communities were, by definition, community-led. Software was designed and created organically by communities of users in response to their needs and inspiration. The results, to a degree nobody predicted, were often magical.


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Election fraud: Is there an open source solution?

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Can open source technology help keep our elections honest? With its Trust The Vote Project, the Open Source Election Technology (OSET) Institute is working on making that a reality for elections in the United States and around the world.


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How Ansible brought peace to my home

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 07:03:00 AM

A few months ago, I read Marco Bravo's article How to use Ansible to document procedures on Opensource.com. I will admit, I didn't quite get it at the time. I was not actively using Ansible, and I remember thinking it looked like more work than it was worth. But I had an open mind and decided to spend time looking deeper into Ansible.


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Getting started with Zsh

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

Z-shell (or Zsh) is an interactive Bourne-like POSIX shell known for its abundance of innovative features. Z-Shell users often cite its many conveniences and credit it for increased efficiency and extensive customization.


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3 steps to developing psychological safety

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

Psychological safety is a belief that one will not be punished or humiliated for speaking up with ideas, questions, concerns, or mistakes. And it's critical for high-performing teams in open organizations.


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More in Tux Machines

Purism Partners with Halo Privacy to Bring Extra Security to Its Linux Devices

Purism is already known for providing top notch security and privacy for its Linux laptops and phones, but with the new partnership with Halo Privacy, the company wants to bring strong cryptography and custom managed attribution techniques to secure communications from direct attacks. These new, unique security stack provided by Halo Privacy works together with Purism's state-of-the-art security implementations for its Linux devices, including the Librem Key USB security token with tamper detection and PureBoot secure UEFI replacement, to cryptographically guarantee signing of the lowest level of firmware and user's privacy. Read more

Android Leftovers

Red Hat: Puff Pieces, OpenStack, OpenShift, CodeReady and More

  • Red Hat and SAS: Enabling enterprise intelligence across the hybrid cloud

    Every day 2.5 quintillion bytes of big data is created - this data comes from externally sourced websites, blog posts, tweets, sensors of various types and public data initiatives such as the human genome project as well as audio and video recordings from smart devices/apps and the Internet of Things (IoT). Many businesses are learning how to look beyond just data volume (storage requirements), velocity (port bandwidth) and variety (voice, video and data) of this data; they are learning how to use the data to make intelligent business decisions. Today, every organization, across geographies and industries can innovate digitally, creating more customer value and differentiation while helping to level the competitive playing field. The ability to capture and analyze big data and apply context-based visibility and control into actionable information is what creates an intelligent enterprise. It entails using data to get real-time insights across the lines of business which can then drive improved operations, innovation, new areas of growth and deliver enhanced customer and end user experiences

  • Working together to raise mental health awareness: How Red Hat observed World Mental Health Day

    Cultivating a diverse and inclusive workspace is an important part of Red Hat’s open culture. That’s why we work to create an environment where associates feel comfortable bringing their whole selves to work every single day. One way we achieve this mission is by making sure that Red Hatters who wish to share their mental health experiences, are met with compassion and understanding, but most importantly, without stigma. It is estimated that one in four adults suffers from mental illness every year.

  • Introducing Red Hat OpenShift 4.2: Developers get an expanded and improved toolbox

    Today Red Hat announces Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extending its commitment to simplifying and automating the cloud and empowering developers to innovate. Red Hat OpenShift 4, introduced in May, is the next generation of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform, reengineered to address the complexity of managing container-based applications in production systems. It is designed as a self-managing platform with automatic software updates and lifecycle management across hybrid cloud environments, built on the trusted foundation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS. The Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release focuses on tooling that is designed to deliver a developer-centric user experience. It also helps cluster administrators by easing the management of the platform and applications, with the availability of OpenShift migration tooling from 3.x to 4.x, as well as newly supported disconnected installs.

  • A look at the most exciting features in OpenStack Train

    With all eyes turning towards Shanghai, we’re getting ready for the next Open Infrastructure Summit in November with great excitement. But before we hit the road, I wanted to draw attention to the latest OpenStack upstream release. The Train release continues to showcase the community’s drive toward offering innovations in OpenStack. Red Hat has been part of developing more than 50 new features spanning Nova, Ironic, Cinder, TripleO and many more projects. But given all the technology goodies (you can see the release highlights here) that the Train release has to offer, you may be curious about the features that we at Red Hat believe are among the top capabilities that will benefit our telecommunications and enterprise customers and their uses cases. Here's an overview of the features we are most excited about this release.

  • New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2

    Today’s announcement of Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 represents a major release for developers working with OpenShift and Kubernetes. There is a new application development-focused user interface, new tools, and plugins for container builds, CI/CD pipelines, and serverless architecture.

  • Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS

    Red Hat CodeReady Containers 1.0 is now available with support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.2. CodeReady Containers is “OpenShift on your laptop,” the easiest way to get a local OpenShift environment running on your machine. You can get an overview of CodeReady Containers in the tech preview launch post. You can download CodeReady Containers from the product page.

  • Tour of the Developer Perspective in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 web console

    Of all of the new features of the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release, what I’ve been looking forward to the most are the developer-focused updates to the web console. If you’ve used OpenShift 4.1, then you’re probably already familiar with the updated Administrator Perspective, which is where you can manage workloads, storage, networking, cluster settings, and more. The addition of the new Developer Perspective aims to give developers an optimized experience with the features and workflows they’re most likely to need to be productive. Developers can focus on higher level abstractions like their application and components, and then drill down deeper to get to the OpenShift and Kubernetes resources that make up their application. Let’s take a tour of the Developer Perspective and explore some of the key features.

A Quick Look At EXT4 vs. ZFS Performance On Ubuntu 19.10 With An NVMe SSD

For those thinking of playing with Ubuntu 19.10's new experimental ZFS desktop install option in opting for using ZFS On Linux in place of EXT4 as the root file-system, here are some quick benchmarks looking at the out-of-the-box performance of ZFS/ZoL vs. EXT4 on Ubuntu 19.10 using a common NVMe solid-state drive. Given Canonical has brought ZFS support to its Ubiquity desktop installer as an easy-to-deploy option for running on this popular file-system, for this initial round of testing from Ubuntu 19.10 a lone NVMe SSD is being used (Corsair Force MP600) as opposed to doing any multi-disk setups, etc, where ZFS is more common due to its rich feature set. Clean installs of Ubuntu 19.10 were done both with EXT4 and ZFS while using the stock mount options / settings each time. The ZoL support in Ubuntu 19.10 is relying upon various back-ports from ZFS On Linux 0.8.2 and this imminent Linux distribution update is shipping with a 5.3-based kernel. Read more