Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 2 hours 15 min ago

Tips for success when getting started with Ansible

Friday 2nd of February 2018 08:02:00 AM

Ansible is an open source automation tool used to configure servers, install software, and perform a wide variety of IT tasks from one central location. It is a one-to-many agentless mechanism where all instructions are run from a control machine that communicates with remote clients over SSH, although other protocols are also supported.


read more

Command Line Heroes, an original podcast

Friday 2nd of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

I don't know about you, but my podcast list grows by the day. With this super, popular medium—podcasts—there seems to be a new, popular podcast to check out every day. A couple of weeks ago, Red Hat joined that list with Command Line Heroes.


read more

Announcing the 2018 Opensource.com Community Awards winners

Friday 2nd of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

Every year, Opensource.com awards people from our community who have excelled in contributing and sharing stories with our readers. These stories reflect how we use open source in our everyday lives, how it helps us build a better future with open technology, and how openness is changing the world.


read more

Top 7 open source project management tools for agile teams

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:04:00 AM

Opensource.com has surveyed the landscape of popular open source project management tools. We've done this before—but this year we've added a twist. This time, we're looking specifically at tools that support agile methodology, including related practices such as Scrum, Lean, and Kanban.


read more

How I coined the term 'open source'

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:03:00 AM

In a few days, on February 3, the 20th anniversary of the introduction of the term "open source software" is upon us. As open source software grows in popularity and powers some of the most robust and important innovations of our time, we reflect on its rise to prominence.


read more

6 pivotal moments in open source history

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

Open source has taken a prominent role in the IT industry today. It is everywhere from the smallest embedded systems to the biggest supercomputer, from the phone in your pocket to the software running the websites and infrastructure of the companies we engage with every day. Let's explore how we got here and discuss key moments from the past 40 years that have paved a path to the current day.


read more

Making the open organization work(book)

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

The open organization community sure knows how to throw a party.

On January 18, 2017, everyone gathered on Twitter to celebrate The Open Organization Workbook, released last December. Conversation from contributors was lively and sharp.

Here's a recap of all the enlightening chatter.


read more

10 tips for making the Django Admin more secure

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:02:00 AM

This article was co-written with Lacey Williams Henschel.

Offloading the responsibility for making your app secure onto QA testers or an information security office is tempting, but security is everyone's responsibility. The Django Admin is one of our favorite features of Django, but unless it's locked down correctly, it presents opportunities for exploitation. To save your users from compromised data, here are 10 tips to make the Django Admin more secure.


read more

A history of low-level Linux container runtimes

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:01:00 AM

At Red Hat we like to say, "Containers are Linux—Linux is Containers." Here is what this means. Traditional containers are processes on a system that usually have the following three characteristics:

1. Resource constraints

When you run lots of containers on a system, you do not want to have any container monopolize the operating system, so we use resource constraints to control things like CPU, memory, network bandwidth, etc. The Linux kernel provides the cgroups feature, which can be configured to control the container process resources.


read more

4 new OpenStack tips and guides

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:00:00 AM

If you work with OpenStack, you know it can be challenging to keep up with all of the various features, tools, related project, and other technical details that you need to do your job, whether that’s as a developer, an architect, or a sysadmin.


read more

Microservices vs. monolith: How to choose

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:00:00 AM

For many startups, conventional wisdom says to start with a monolith architecture over microservices. But are there exceptions to this?

The upcoming book, Microservices for Startups, explores the benefits and drawbacks of microservices, offering insights from dozens of CTOs.


read more

An introduction to the DomTerm terminal emulator for Linux

Tuesday 30th of January 2018 08:03:00 AM

DomTerm is a modern terminal emulator that uses a browser engine as a "GUI toolkit." This enables some neat features, such as embeddable graphics and links, HTML rich text, and foldable (show/hide) commands. Otherwise it looks and feels like a feature-full, standalone terminal emulator, with excellent xterm compatibility (including mouse handling and 24-bit color), and appropriate "chrome" (menus).


read more

Refreshing old computers with Linux

Tuesday 30th of January 2018 08:02:00 AM

It's nearly impossible to enter a school these days without seeing an abundance of technology. Despite this influx of computers into education, funding inequity forces school systems to make difficult choices. Some educators see things as they are and wonder, "Why?" while others see problems as opportunities and think, "Why not?"

Andrew Dobbie is one of those visionaries who saw his love of Linux and computer reimaging as a unique learning opportunity for his students.


read more

Truly open education will require sweeping changes

Tuesday 30th of January 2018 08:01:00 AM

It is no secret that American schools have struggled to prepare students for the jobs of today and tomorrow. Critics have blamed schools' shortcomings on a variety of factors: change-resistant bureaucracy, low standards, straying too far from the Three R's, inadequate teacher training, and more. One potential root cause of this fundamental issue is that the education system isn't built to be responsive to a rapidly changing environment.


read more

Graphics and music tools for game development

Tuesday 30th of January 2018 08:00:00 AM

In early October, our club, Geeks and Gadgets from Marshall University, participated in the inaugural Open Jam, a game jam that celebrated the best of open source tools. Game jams are events where participants work as teams to develop computer games for fun. Jams tend to be very short—only three days long—and very exhausting.


read more

A look inside Facebook's open source program

Monday 29th of January 2018 08:02:00 AM

Open source becomes more ubiquitous every year, appearing everywhere from government municipalities to universities. Companies of all sizes are also increasingly turning to open source software. In fact, some companies are taking open source a step further by supporting projects financially or working with developers.


read more

Parsing HTML with Python

Monday 29th of January 2018 08:01:00 AM

As a long-time member of the documentation team at Scribus, I keep up-to-date with the latest updates of the source so I can help make updates and additions to the documentation. When I recently did a "checkout" using Subversion on a computer I had just upgraded to Fedora 27, I was amazed at how long it took to download the documentation, which consists of HTML pages and associated images.


read more

CopperheadOS: Security features, installing apps, and more

Monday 29th of January 2018 08:00:00 AM

Editor's note: CopperheadOS is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International and based on Android Open Source Project (AOSP)


read more

Being open about data privacy

Sunday 28th of January 2018 08:00:00 AM

Today is Data Privacy Day, ("Data Protection Day" in Europe), and you might think that those of us in the open source world should think that all data should be free, as information supposedly wants to be, but life's not that simple. That's for two main reasons:


read more

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.