Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 2 hours 15 min ago

5 signs you're a groff programmer

Saturday 10th of April 2021 07:00:00 AM

I first discovered Unix systems in the early 1990s, when I was an undergraduate at university. I liked it so much that I replaced the MS-DOS system on my home computer with the Linux operating system.


read more

Stream event data with this open source tool

Friday 9th of April 2021 07:02:00 AM

In my previous article, I introduced RudderStack, an open source, warehouse-first customer data pipeline. In this article, I demonstrate how easy Rudderstack makes it to set up and use event streams.


read more

4 ways open source gives you a competitive edge

Friday 9th of April 2021 07:01:00 AM

Building a tech stack is a major decision for every organization. While picking the right tools will set your team up for success, picking the wrong solutions or platforms can have devastating effects on productivity and profitability. To succeed in today's fast-paced world, organizations must make smart investments in digital solutions that enable them to move faster and increase operational agility.


read more

To be an open leader, listen to your heart

Friday 9th of April 2021 07:00:00 AM

Allowing talented leadership to excel in a more open organizational structure can determine a young company's success. But in order to transform into a more open organization, you'll need to provide that space for talented leaders to grow.

This doesn't always come easy to leaders. Ultimately, however, the only way to do it is to begin with yourself—and to address the issue not only your head but also your heart, your feelings.


read more

5 commands to level-up your Git game

Thursday 8th of April 2021 07:01:00 AM

If you use Git regularly, you might be aware that it has several reputations. It's probably the most popular version-control solution and is used by some of the biggest software projects around to keep track of changes to files. It provides a robust interface to review and incorporate experimental changes into existing documents.


read more

Protect external storage with this Linux encryption system

Thursday 8th of April 2021 07:00:00 AM

Many people consider hard drives secure because they physically own them. It's difficult to read the data on a hard drive that you don't have, and many people think that protecting their computer with a passphrase makes the data on the drive unreadable.

This isn't always the case, partly because, in some cases, a passphrase serves only to unlock a user session. In other words, you can power on a computer, but because you don't have its passphrase, you can't get to the desktop, and so you have no way to open files to look at them.


read more

Why I love using bspwm for my Linux window manager

Wednesday 7th of April 2021 07:02:00 AM

Some folks like to rearrange furniture. Other folks like to try new shoes or redecorate their bedroom on the regular. Me? I try out Linux desktops.

After drooling over some of the incredible desktop environments I've seen online, I got curious about one window manager in particular: bspwm.


read more

What is Git cherry-picking?

Wednesday 7th of April 2021 07:01:00 AM

Whenever you're working with a group of programmers on a project, whether small or large, handling changes between multiple Git branches can become difficult. Sometimes, instead of combining an entire Git branch into a different one, you want to select and move a couple of specific commits. This procedure is known as "cherry-picking."

This article will cover the what, why, and how of cherry-picking.

So let's start.


read more

Get started with batch files in FreeDOS

Wednesday 7th of April 2021 07:00:00 AM

On Linux, it's common to create shell scripts to automate repetitive tasks. Similarly, on FreeDOS, the open source implementation of old DOS operating systems, you can create a batch file containing several FreeDOS commands. Then you can run your batch file to execute each command in order.


read more

My favorite open source tools to meet new friends

Saturday 27th of March 2021 07:00:00 AM

In March 2020, I joined the rest of the world in quarantine at home for two weeks. Then, two weeks turned into more. And more. It wasn't too hard on me at first. I had been working a remote job for a year already, and I'm sort of an introvert in some ways. Being at home was sort of "business as usual" for me, but I watched as it took its toll on others, including my wife.


read more

How to read and write files in C++

Friday 26th of March 2021 07:02:00 AM

In C++, reading and writing to files can be done by using I/O streams in conjunction with the stream operators >> and <<. When reading or writing to files, those operators are applied to an instance of a class representing a file on the hard drive. This stream-based approach has a huge advantage: From a C ++ perspective, it doesn't matter what you are reading or writing to, whether it's a file, a database, the console, or another PC you are connected to over the network.


read more

Why you should care about service mesh

Friday 26th of March 2021 07:01:00 AM

Many developers wonder why they should care about service mesh. It's a question I'm asked often in my presentations at developer meetups, conferences, and hands-on workshops about microservices development with cloud-native architecture. My answer is always the same: "As long as you want to simplify your microservices architecture, it should be running on Kubernetes."


read more

10 open source tools for content creators

Friday 26th of March 2021 07:00:00 AM

There are a lot of well-known open source applications used in web design, but there are also many great tools that are not as popular. I thought I'd challenge myself to find some obscure options on the chance I might find something useful.

Open source offers a wealth of options, so it's no surprise that I found 10 new applications that I now consider indispensable to my work.

Bulma


read more

Elevating open leaders by getting out of their way

Thursday 25th of March 2021 11:45:00 AM

Today, we're seeing the rapid rise of agile organizations capable of quickly and effectively adapting to market new ideas with large-scale impacts. These companies tend to have something in common: they have a clear core direction and young, energetic leaders—leaders who encourage their talented employees to develop their potential.


read more

How to use the Linux sed command

Thursday 25th of March 2021 07:02:00 AM

Few Unix commands are as famous as sed, grep, and awk. They get grouped together often, possibly because they have strange names and powerful tools for parsing text. They also share some syntactical and logical similarities. And while they're all useful for parsing text, each has its specialties. This article examines the sed command, which is a stream editor.


read more

Identify Linux performance bottlenecks using open source tools

Thursday 25th of March 2021 07:01:00 AM

Computers are integrated systems that only perform as fast as their slowest hardware component. If one component is less capable than the others—if it falls behind and can't keep up—it can hold your entire system back. That's a performance bottleneck. Removing a serious bottleneck can make your system fly.


read more

Linux powers the internet, confirms EU commissioner

Thursday 25th of March 2021 07:00:00 AM

In 20 years of EU digital policy in Brussels, I have seen growing awareness and recognition among policymakers in Europe of the importance of open source software (OSS). A recent keynote by EU internal market commissioner Thierry Breton at the annual EU Open Source Policy Summit in February provides another example—albeit with a sense of urgency and strategic opportunity that has been largely missing in the past.


read more

Read and write files with Bash

Wednesday 24th of March 2021 07:02:00 AM

When you're scripting with Bash, sometimes you need to read data from or write data to a file. Sometimes a file may contain configuration options, and other times the file is the data your user is creating with your application. Every language handles this task a little differently, and this article demonstrates how to handle data files with Bash and other POSIX shells.


read more

Build a to-do list app in React with hooks

Wednesday 24th of March 2021 07:00:00 AM

React is one of the most popular and simple JavaScript libraries for building user interfaces (UIs) because it allows you to create reusable UI components.

Components in React are independent, reusable pieces of code that serve as building blocks for an application. React functional components are JavaScript functions that separate the presentation layer from the business logic. According to the React docs, a simple, functional component can be written like:


read more

Start programming in Deno, an alternative to Node.js

Tuesday 23rd of March 2021 07:02:00 AM

Deno is a simple, modern, and secure runtime for JavaScript and TypeScript. It is an open source project created by Ryan Dahl, who developed Node.js. In Try Deno as an alternative to Node.js, I introduced Deno's features and explained how to install and run it.

Here, I will help you quickly get started with Deno by explaining:


read more

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's howtos

  • Hans de Goede: Changing hidden/locked BIOS settings under Linux

    This all started with a Mele PCG09 before testing Linux on this I took a quick look under Windows and the device-manager there showed an exclamation mark next to a Realtek 8723BS bluetooth device, so BT did not work. Under Linux I quickly found out why, the device actually uses a Broadcom Wifi/BT chipset attached over SDIO/an UART for the Wifi resp. BT parts. The UART connected BT part was described in the ACPI tables with a HID (Hardware-ID) of "OBDA8723", not good. Now I could have easily fixed this with an extra initrd with DSDT-overrride but that did not feel right. There was an option in the BIOS which actually controls what HID gets advertised for the Wifi/BT named "WIFI" which was set to "RTL8723" which obviously is wrong, but that option was grayed out. So instead of going for the DSDT-override I really want to be able to change that BIOS option and set it to the right value. Some duckduckgo-ing found this blogpost on changing locked BIOS settings.

  • Test Day:2021-05-09 Kernel 5.12.2 on Fedora 34

    All logs report PASSED for each test done and uploaded as prompted at instruction page.

  • James Hunt: Can you handle an argument?

    This post explores some of the darker corners of command-line parsing that some may be unaware of. [...] No, I’m not questioning your debating skills, I’m referring to parsing command-lines! Parsing command-line option is something most programmers need to deal with at some point. Every language of note provides some sort of facility for handling command-line options. All a programmer needs to do is skim read the docs or grab the sample code, tweak to taste, et voila! But is it that simple? Do you really understand what is going on? I would suggest that most programmers really don’t think that much about it. Handling the parsing of command-line options is just something you bolt on to your codebase. And then you move onto the more interesting stuff. Yes, it really does tend to be that easy and everything just works… most of the time. Most? I hit an interesting issue recently which expanded in scope somewhat. It might raise an eyebrow for some or be a minor bomb-shell for others.

  • 10 Very Stupid Linux Commands [ Some Of Them Deadly ]

    If you are reading this page then you are like all of us a Linux fan, also you are using the command line every day and absolutely love Linux. But even in love and marriage there are things that make you just a little bit annoyed. Here in this article we are going to show you some of the most stupid Linux commands that a person can find.

China Is Launching A New Alternative To Google Summer of Code, Outreachy

The Institute of Software Chinese Academy of Sciences (ISCAS) in cooperation with the Chinese openEuler Linux distribution have been working on their own project akin to Google Summer of Code and Outreachy for paying university-aged students to become involved in open-source software development. "Summer 2021" as the initiative is simply called or "Summer 2021 of Open Source Promotion Plan" is providing university-aged students around the world funding by the Institute of Software Chinese Academy of Sciences to work on community open-source projects. It's just like Google Summer of Code but with offering different funding levels based upon the complexity of the project -- funding options are 12000 RMB, 9000 RMB, or 6000 RMB. That's roughly $932 to $1,865 USD for students to devote their summer to working on open-source. There are not any gender/nationality restrictions with this initative but students must be at least eighteen years old. Read more

Kernel: Linux 5.10 and Linux 5.13

  • Linux 5.10 LTS Will Be Maintained Through End Of Year 2026 - Phoronix

    Linux 5.10 as the latest Long Term Support release when announced was only going to be maintained until the end of 2022 but following enough companies stepping up to help with testing, Linux 5.10 LTS will now be maintained until the end of year 2026. Linux 5.10 LTS was originally just going to be maintained until the end of next year while prior kernels like Linux 5.4 LTS are being maintained until 2024 or even Linux 4.19 LTS and 4.14 LTS going into 2024. Linux 5.10 LTS was short to begin with due to the limited number of developers/organizations helping to test new point release candidates and/or committing resources to using this kernel LTS series. But now there are enough participants committing to it that Greg Kroah-Hartman confirmed he along with Sasha Levin will maintain the kernel through December 2026.

  • Oracle Continues Working On The Maple Tree For The Linux Kernel

    Oracle engineers have continued working on the "Maple Tree" data structure for the Linux kernel as an RCU-safe, range-based B-tree designed to make efficient use of modern processor caches. Sent out last year was the RFC patch series of Maple Tree for the Linux kernel to introduce this new data structure and make initial use of it. Sent out last week was the latest 94 patches in a post-RFC state for introducing this data structure.

  • Linux 5.13 Brings Simplified Retpolines Handling - Phoronix

    In addition to work like Linux 5.13 addressing some network overhead caused by Retpolines, this next kernel's return trampoline implementation itself is seeing a simplification. Merged as part of x86/core last week for the Linux 5.13 kernel were enabling PPIN support for Xeon Sapphire Rapids, KProbes improvements, and other minor changes plus simplifying the Retpolines implementation used by some CPUs as part of the Spectre V2 mitigations. The x86/core pull request for Linux 5.13 also re-sorts and better documents Intel's increasingly long list of different CPU cores/models.

  • Linux 5.13 Adds Support For SPI NOR One-Time Programmable Memory Regions - Phoronix

    The Linux 5.13 kernel has initial support for dealing with SPI one-time programmable (OTP) flash memory regions. Linux 5.13 adds the new MTD OTP functions for accessing SPI one-time programmable data. The OTP are memory regions intended to be programmed once and can be used for permanent secure identification, immutable properties, and similar purposes. In addition to adding the core infrastructure support for OTP to the MTD SPI-NOR code in Linux 5.13, the functionality is wired up for Winbond and similar flash memory chips. The MTD subsystem has already supported OTP areas but not for SPI-NOR flash memory.