Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 13 min 15 sec ago

A beginner's guide to building DevOps pipelines with open source tools

Monday 8th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

DevOps has become the default answer to fixing software development processes that are slow, siloed, or otherwise dysfunctional. But that doesn't mean very much when you're new to DevOps and aren't sure where to begin. This article explores what a DevOps pipeline is and offers a five-step process to create one. While this tutorial is not comprehensive, it should give you a foundation to start on and expand later. But first, a story.


read more

Getting started with Python's cryptography library

Monday 8th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

The first rule of cryptography club is: never invent a cryptography system yourself. The second rule of cryptography club is: never implement a cryptography system yourself: many real-world holes are found in the implementation phase of a cryptosystem as well as in the design.


read more

Bash vs. Python: Which language should you use?

Monday 8th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

Bash and Python are most automation engineers' favorite programming languages. Both have pros and cons, and sometimes it can be hard to choose which one you should use. The honest answer is: It depends on the task, the scope, the context, and the complexity of the task.

Let's compare these two languages to get a better understanding of where each one shines.


read more

Happy 14th anniversary Git: What do you love about Git?

Sunday 7th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

In the 14 years since Linus Torvalds developed Git, its influence on software development practices would be hard to match—in StackOverflow's 2018 developer survey, 87% of respondents said they use Git for version control. Clearly, no other tool is anywhere close to knocking Git off its throne as the king of source control management (SCM).

In honor of Git's 14th anniversary on April 7, I asked some enthusiasts what they love most about it. Here's what they told me.


read more

Manage multimedia files with Git

Sunday 7th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Git is very specifically designed for source code version control, so it's rarely embraced by projects and industries that don't primarily work in plaintext. However, the advantages of an asynchronous workflow are appealing, especially in the ever-growing number of industries that combine serious computing with seriously artistic ventures, including web design, visual effects, video games, publishing, currency design (yes, that's a real industry), education… the list goes on and on.


read more

Run a server with Git

Saturday 6th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

As I've tried to demonstrate in this series leading up to Git's 14th anniversary on April 7, Git can do a wide range of things beyond tracking source code. Believe it or not, Git can even manage your Git server, so you can, more or less, run a Git server with Git itself.


read more

Streaming internet radio with RadioDroid

Friday 5th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Online news outlets have recently lamented the passing of Google's Chromecast Audio device. The device received favorable reviews in the audio press, so I had already been thinking about acquiring one. Given the news of Chromecast's demise, I decided to look for one at a reasonable price—before they were all snapped up or thrown in the dumpster.


read more

File sharing with Git

Friday 5th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

Git is one of those rare applications that has managed to encapsulate so much of modern computing into one program that it ends up serving as the computational engine for many other applications. While it's best-known for tracking source code changes in software development, it has many other uses that can make your life easier and more organized. In this series leading up to Git's 14th anniversary on April 7, we'll share seven little-known ways to use Git.


read more

5 open source tools for teaching young children to read

Friday 5th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Anyone who sees a child using a tablet or smartphone observes their seemingly innate ability to scroll through apps and swipe through screens, flexing those "digital native" muscles. According to Common Sense Media, the percentage of US households in which 0- to 8-year-olds have access to a smartphone has grown from 52% in 2011 to 98% in 2017.


read more

9 features developers should know about Selenium IDE

Thursday 4th of April 2019 07:03:00 AM

There has long been a stigma associated with using record-and-playback tools for testing rather than scripted QA automation tools like Selenium Webdriver, Cypress, and WebdriverIO.


read more

How writers can get work done better with Git

Thursday 4th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Git is one of those rare applications that has managed to encapsulate so much of modern computing into one program that it ends up serving as the computational engine for many other applications. While it's best-known for tracking source code changes in software development, it has many other uses that can make your life easier and more organized. In this series leading up to Git's 14th anniversary on April 7, we'll share seven little-known ways to use Git. Today, we'll look at ways writers can use Git to get work done.


read more

Managing Python packages the right way

Thursday 4th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

The Python Package Index (PyPI) indexes an amazing array of libraries and applications covering every use case imaginable. However, when it comes to installing and using these packages, newcomers often find themselves running into issues with missing permissions, incompatible library dependencies, and installations that break in surprising ways.


read more

Why you should choose mindfulness over multitasking

Thursday 4th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

You have your morning coffee in hand, you've just finished your daily scrum, and you sit down at your computer to start your day. Up pops a Slack message. You scan your emails, then bounce back to Slack. You look at your calendar to see when your next meeting is—much to your surprise, it's starting in 15 minutes. You get back to your desk and check your to-do list to see what tasks you can fit in before your next meeting, but one of your co-workers asks for your help to solve a problem. Before you know it, half of your day has disappeared.


read more

Use Git as the backend for chat

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Git is one of those rare applications that has managed to encapsulate so much of modern computing into one program that it ends up serving as the computational engine for many other applications. While it's best-known for tracking source code changes in software development, it has many other uses that can make your life easier and more organized. In this series leading up to Git's 14th anniversary on April 7, we'll share seven little-known ways to use Git. Today, we'll look at GIC, a Git-based chat application


read more

5 useful open source log analysis tools

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

Monitoring network activity can be a tedious job, but there are good reasons to do it. For one, it allows you to find and investigate suspicious logins on workstations, devices connected to networks, and servers while identifying sources of administrator abuse. You can also trace software installations and data transfers to identify potential issues in real time rather than after the damage is done.


read more

8 principles to achieve DevOps at scale

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Since you clicked on this article, you may be wondering why you aren't achieving the level of quality, efficiency, and satisfaction you expect from your DevOps processes. Maybe you think other organizations are achieving more than you are. If so, you might be trying to do what everyone else is doing, rather than thinking independently and building a DevOps initiative that fits your organization.


read more

Manage your daily schedule with Git

Tuesday 2nd of April 2019 07:03:00 AM

Git is one of those rare applications that has managed to encapsulate so much of modern computing into one program that it ends up serving as the computational engine for many other applications. While it's best-known for tracking source code changes in software development, it has many other uses that can make your life easier and more organized. In this series leading up to Git's 14th anniversary on April 7, we'll share seven little-known ways to use Git. Today, we'll look at using Git to keep track of your calendar.


read more

Parallel computation in Python with Dask

Tuesday 2nd of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

One frequent complaint about Python performance is the global interpreter lock (GIL). Because of GIL, only one thread can execute Python byte code at a time. As a consequence, using threads does not speed up computation—even on modern, multi-core machines.


read more

Automate password resets with PWM

Tuesday 2nd of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

One of the things that can be "death by a thousand cuts" for any IT team's sanity and patience is constantly being asked to reset passwords.

The best way we've found to handle this is to ditch your hashing algorithms and store your passwords in plaintext so that your users can retrieve them at any time.

Ha! I am, of course, kidding. That's a terrible idea.

When your users forget their passwords, you'll still need to reset them. But is there a way to break free from the monotonous, repetitive task of doing it manually?


read more

Making computer science curricula as adaptable as our code

Tuesday 2nd of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Educators in elementary computer science face a lack of adaptable curricula. Calls for more modifiable, non-rigid curricula are therefore enticing—assuming that such curricula could benefit teachers by increasing their ability to mold resources for individual classrooms and, ultimately, produce better teaching experiences and learning outcomes.


read more

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: 5 Reasons to Upgrade, Sophia Sanles-Luksetich Interview, Ubuntu on Neural Compute Stick and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

  • 5 Reasons to Upgrade to Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo"
    On the surface, new versions of Ubuntu aren’t as big as they used to be. Like in the days before Canonical created its own Unity interface, the Ubuntu experience is now functionally similar to what you get in alternatives such as Fedora and openSUSE. But there are a few big reasons to be eager for what Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” has to offer, with some additions demonstrating just how nice it is to have Ubuntu desktop developers spending more time working directly on GNOME.
  • Women and Nonbinary People in Information Security: Sophia Sanles-Luksetich
    Sophia Sanles-Luksetich: I am a rookie information security consultant. I currently perform bug bounty triage for companies which I am not allowed to name, but let’s just say most folks have heard of these companies. Before I got into information security, I was an IT generalist who dabbled in a bit of programming, Linux and privacy. Ubuntu was actually my first OS. It’s funny to think now that my decision as a 12-year-old could have impacted my career so much ten years later. KC: I must admit that it’s unusual that Ubuntu was your first OS. But that’s great! I use Kubuntu on my work desktop. Did that make you delve into Debian a bit? SSL: Oh cool! I have dabbled with Debian a bit, but not as much as most folks would expect. I think I learned a lot more soft skills using Ubuntu at a young age. Like when I couldn’t download my favorite game as a kid, I spent hours reading error logs, documentation and forums to figure out how to get the game working on my computer. Open Source Software (OSS) is also very modular compared to a lot of closed source software, so learning how software is built on other software was a big help. Now everything is miles down a supply chain that most people can barely scratch the surface of, at least in my opinion. [...] KC: Excellent. How did you get into Ubuntu computing initially? SSL: We had a family computer that stopped working. Rather than buy a new Windows disk to fix it, I asked around to my friends. Funny enough, one of my friend’s dad worked in information security, and I played board games with him and his son. I asked his son to give me a copy, and he messed it up by downloading it onto the CD rather than doing an image transfer. Lucky for me, I had a bit more a competent IT friend, Rikki, who ripped me a fresh CD. It’s funny, too; she was a lot more like me then, I thought. We both started in theater and ended up getting into computers just because they are resourceful and we were both people who loved the convenience for record keeping. I think what got me into OSS, to begin with, was the idea that I never had to pay for it. I am a cheapskate. I can think of a good chunk of my IT experience that I learned by trying to get something for free. I learned how to torrent, how to not screw up your computer on harmful sites. Always a fun time! [...] SSL: I think if I could give one piece of advice to new cybersecurity folks, I would tell them all to volunteer at conferences and talk to the attendees. You will learn a lot just by talking to people in the field. Oh, and of course, don’t discount soft skills and the fundamentals.
  • How developers are using Intel’s AI tools to make planet Earth a better place
    Biswas first gathered plant data from Google images, then used TensorFlow (widely-used machine learning framework in the deep learning space) and Open Vino (Intel’s neural network optimisation toolkit) to build an AI model. Once the images and videos of plants were captured the model is used to identify the cause of the disease, possible cures and preventive measures. To run these solutions, Biswas used Intel 7th Gen i5 NUC mini PC. [...] Ma took a digital microscope and connected it to a modestly powerful Ubuntu based laptop with Intel’s Neural Compute Stick connected to it. The entire system cost less than $500. The neural network at the heart of the system was able to successfully determine the shape, colour, density, and edges of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the bacteria that causes cholera.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575

Android Leftovers

Kodi 'Leia' 18.2 now available to download with bug fixes and performance improvements

The Kodi Foundation made the release candidate for Kodi 18.2 available last week, and today you can grab the final version. As you’d expect, this is a bug fix release with no major new functionality, but there are a number of notable changes including improvements to the music database performance and a new Codec Factory for Android. Read more

howtos and programming leftovers