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Assemble this game console in four hours

Monday 5th of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

Retro game consoles that are easy to program are a great way to introduce anyone—and especially kids—to video game development. One of these is Gamebuino, a preassembled, handheld retro game console. It's kind of an Arduino on steroids, with a Nokia 5110 mobile phone display (84x48 pixels), LiPo charger and LiPo battery, an SD card reader, and an SD card with a bunch of games. MAKERbuino, which is basically a Gamebuino kit that you get to assemble and solder together, seemed more interesting to me.


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Talking to normal people about security

Monday 5th of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

Most people1 don't realise quite how much fun security is, or exactly how sexy security expertise makes you to other people.2 We know that it's engrossing, engaging, and cool, they don't.


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Open source software: 20 years and counting

Saturday 3rd of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

Twenty years ago, in February 1998, the term "open source" was first applied to software. Soon afterwards, the Open Source Definition was created and the seeds that became the Open Source Initiative (OSI) were sown. As the OSD’s author Bruce Perens relates,

“Open source” is the proper name of a campaign to promote the pre-existing concept of free software to business, and to certify licenses to a rule set.


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'Open source software' turns 20, new Firefox Quantum privacy features, and more news

Saturday 3rd of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

In this week's edition of our open source news roundup we cover the 20-year anniversary of the coining of the term "open source software," the release of LibreOffice 6.0, and more.

'Open source software' turns 20

This week 20 years since Christine Peterson, co-founder and then-executive director of the Foresight Institute, coined the term "open source software." For the first time ever, she shared her account of how, in 1998, the term came to describe the now-prevalent software development method.


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January top articles and what's coming up next

Friday 2nd of February 2018 08:15:00 PM

January marks 8 years of Opensource.com, so it's only fitting that we'd also set new record on the site. Opensource.com brought in 736,901 unique visitors who generated 1,202,182 page views in January, a new all-time record for both metrics.

We published 85 articles last month, and welcomed 26 new authors. More than 62% of our content was contributed by members of the open source community, and our community moderators contributed 17 articles.


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Top 5: Saving old computers with Linux, an open source history lesson, and more

Friday 2nd of February 2018 03:15:00 PM

We're celebrating an important open source anniversary, a middle school that's saving old computers with Linux, and more in this week's top 5. Check it out!

Top 5 posts 5. An introduction to DomTerm, a Linux terminal emulator

DomTerm is a bit different than your average terminal emulator, thanks in large part to using a browser engine as a "GUI toolkit." Software engineer Per Bothner gives hands-on look at a few of the features that make this open source tool special.


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Tips for success when getting started with Ansible

Friday 2nd of February 2018 08:02:00 AM

Ansible is an open source automation tool used to configure servers, install software, and perform a wide variety of IT tasks from one central location. It is a one-to-many agentless mechanism where all instructions are run from a control machine that communicates with remote clients over SSH, although other protocols are also supported.


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Command Line Heroes, an original podcast

Friday 2nd of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

I don't know about you, but my podcast list grows by the day. With this super, popular medium—podcasts—there seems to be a new, popular podcast to check out every day. A couple of weeks ago, Red Hat joined that list with Command Line Heroes.


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Announcing the 2018 Opensource.com Community Awards winners

Friday 2nd of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

Every year, Opensource.com awards people from our community who have excelled in contributing and sharing stories with our readers. These stories reflect how we use open source in our everyday lives, how it helps us build a better future with open technology, and how openness is changing the world.


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Top 7 open source project management tools for agile teams

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:04:00 AM

Opensource.com has surveyed the landscape of popular open source project management tools. We've done this before—but this year we've added a twist. This time, we're looking specifically at tools that support agile methodology, including related practices such as Scrum, Lean, and Kanban.


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How I coined the term 'open source'

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:03:00 AM

In a few days, on February 3, the 20th anniversary of the introduction of the term "open source software" is upon us. As open source software grows in popularity and powers some of the most robust and important innovations of our time, we reflect on its rise to prominence.


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6 pivotal moments in open source history

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

Open source has taken a prominent role in the IT industry today. It is everywhere from the smallest embedded systems to the biggest supercomputer, from the phone in your pocket to the software running the websites and infrastructure of the companies we engage with every day. Let's explore how we got here and discuss key moments from the past 40 years that have paved a path to the current day.


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Making the open organization work(book)

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

The open organization community sure knows how to throw a party.

On January 18, 2017, everyone gathered on Twitter to celebrate The Open Organization Workbook, released last December. Conversation from contributors was lively and sharp.

Here's a recap of all the enlightening chatter.


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10 tips for making the Django Admin more secure

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:02:00 AM

This article was co-written with Lacey Williams Henschel.

Offloading the responsibility for making your app secure onto QA testers or an information security office is tempting, but security is everyone's responsibility. The Django Admin is one of our favorite features of Django, but unless it's locked down correctly, it presents opportunities for exploitation. To save your users from compromised data, here are 10 tips to make the Django Admin more secure.


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A history of low-level Linux container runtimes

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:01:00 AM

At Red Hat we like to say, "Containers are Linux—Linux is Containers." Here is what this means. Traditional containers are processes on a system that usually have the following three characteristics:

1. Resource constraints

When you run lots of containers on a system, you do not want to have any container monopolize the operating system, so we use resource constraints to control things like CPU, memory, network bandwidth, etc. The Linux kernel provides the cgroups feature, which can be configured to control the container process resources.


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4 new OpenStack tips and guides

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:00:00 AM

If you work with OpenStack, you know it can be challenging to keep up with all of the various features, tools, related project, and other technical details that you need to do your job, whether that’s as a developer, an architect, or a sysadmin.


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Microservices vs. monolith: How to choose

Wednesday 31st of January 2018 08:00:00 AM

For many startups, conventional wisdom says to start with a monolith architecture over microservices. But are there exceptions to this?

The upcoming book, Microservices for Startups, explores the benefits and drawbacks of microservices, offering insights from dozens of CTOs.


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An introduction to the DomTerm terminal emulator for Linux

Tuesday 30th of January 2018 08:03:00 AM

DomTerm is a modern terminal emulator that uses a browser engine as a "GUI toolkit." This enables some neat features, such as embeddable graphics and links, HTML rich text, and foldable (show/hide) commands. Otherwise it looks and feels like a feature-full, standalone terminal emulator, with excellent xterm compatibility (including mouse handling and 24-bit color), and appropriate "chrome" (menus).


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Refreshing old computers with Linux

Tuesday 30th of January 2018 08:02:00 AM

It's nearly impossible to enter a school these days without seeing an abundance of technology. Despite this influx of computers into education, funding inequity forces school systems to make difficult choices. Some educators see things as they are and wonder, "Why?" while others see problems as opportunities and think, "Why not?"

Andrew Dobbie is one of those visionaries who saw his love of Linux and computer reimaging as a unique learning opportunity for his students.


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Truly open education will require sweeping changes

Tuesday 30th of January 2018 08:01:00 AM

It is no secret that American schools have struggled to prepare students for the jobs of today and tomorrow. Critics have blamed schools' shortcomings on a variety of factors: change-resistant bureaucracy, low standards, straying too far from the Three R's, inadequate teacher training, and more. One potential root cause of this fundamental issue is that the education system isn't built to be responsive to a rapidly changing environment.


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More in Tux Machines

SuiteCRM 7.10 Released

  • SuiteCRM 7.10 released
    SalesAgility, the creators and maintainers of SuiteCRM, are excited to announce a new major release of the world’s most popular open source CRM – SuiteCRM 7.10, including highly anticipated new features and many enhancements. SuiteCRM is a fully featured, highly flexible, open source CRM, which can be installed on-premise or in the cloud, and allows companies and organisations to have full control over their own customer data. It delivers actionable insights into customers, boosts conversions, helps increase sales, bolsters customer care and streamlines business operations. The CRM is as powerful as Salesforce and Dynamics, but with the unique benefit of being completely open source.
  • SuiteCRM 7.10 released
    SuiteCRM is a fork of the formerly open-source SugarCRM customer relationship management system.
  • SuiteCRM 7.10 Released For Open-Source Customer Relationship Management
    SuiteCRM 7.10 is now available as the latest major feature release to this customer relationship management (CRM) software forked from SugarCRM's last open-source release.
  • How startups and SME’s can leverage open source CRM to increase business
    Prominent Open Source CRM in India: – SugarCRM Founded in 2004, Sugar CRM has over 7,000 customers and more than half a million users worldwide. Easily one of the largest open sources CRM in the world, SugarCRM offers versatile functionalities including sales-force automation, marketing campaigns, customer support, collaboration, Mobile CRM, Social CRM and reporting. While SugarCRM has released no open source editions since early 2014, its earlier community versions continued to inspire other open source software, namely Suite CRM, Vtiger CRM and SarvCRM. – SuiteCRM Suite CRM is a popular fork of SugarCRM and was launched as the latest version of the SugarCRM in October 2013. In a short period of its existence, it has won several awards and has been adopted by reputed clientele, including the Govt. of UK’s National Health Scheme (NHS) program. Suite CRM is an enterprise-class open source alternative to proprietary alternatives and offers a series of extension for both free and paid-for enhancements. Prominent additional modules available with SuiteCRM include Teams security, Google Maps, Outlook Plugin, Products, Contracts, Invoices, PDF Templates, workflow, reporting and Responsive Theme.

Open source intelligent solutions to transform work, businesses

New trends are opening up new opportunities and new ways to deal with IT, according to Thomas di Giacomo, SUSE CTO, speaking at the SUSE executive roundtable, which the open source company hosted in partnership with ITWeb last week. There are many new and innovative technologies that can help IT leaders meet these new demands, he added. Open source based technologies have become the driving force behind most of the technologically disruptive innovations, said Di Giacomo. "It is pretty clear that all the new innovation is coming from open source. "For example, open source progress with Linux and virtualisation a couple of decades ago, cloud in the last 10 years, and more recently, containers for applications, software-defined infrastructure, and platform-as-a-service, empowering DevOps principles." However, these trends also present some new challenges, said Di Giacomo. Compared to a couple of decades ago, the number of open source projects today has skyrocketed - from hundreds in the different foundations like the Linux Foundation, Apache, Eclipse and others, to millions of projects on Github. Read more

today's lefftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words
    Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.
  • Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People
    Since then, I have heard of another email provider that you may be interested in. It’s a little different, but it touts some of the same features ProtonMail does: privacy, security, open-source code, etc. It’s called Tutanota, and like ProtonMail, I am a very big fan.
  • Open FinTech Forum – Event preview, October 10-11, New York City.
  • The tracker will always get through
    A big objection to tracking protection is the idea that the tracker will always get through. Some people suggest that as browsers give users more ability to control how their personal information gets leaked across sites, things won't get better for users, because third-party tracking will just keep up. On this view, today's easy-to-block third-party cookies will be replaced by techniques such as passive fingerprinting where it's hard to tell if the browser is succeeding at protecting the user or not, and users will be stuck in the same place they are now, or worse. I doubt this is the case because we're playing a more complex game than just trackers vs. users. The game has at least five sides, and some of the fastest-moving players with the best understanding of the game are the adfraud hackers. Right now adfraud is losing in some areas where they had been winning, and the resulting shift in adfraud is likely to shift the risks and rewards of tracking techniques.
  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - February 16, 2018
    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from January 23 - February 16.
  • The major milestones of the Government Digital Service (GDS)
  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft
    Most people have heard of Google’s Tensorflow which was released at the end of 2015, but there’s an active codebase called PyTorch which is easier to understand, less of a black box, and more dynamic. Tensorflow does have solutions for some of those limitations (such as Tensorflow-fold, and Tensorflow-Eager) but these new capabilities remove the need for other features and complexity of Tensorflow. Google built a great system for doing static computation graphs before realizing that most people want dynamic graphs. Doh! [...] I wish PyTorch used the AGPL license. Most neural networks are run on servers today, it is hardly used on the Linux desktop. Data is central to AI and that can stay owned by FB and the users of course. The ImageNet dataset created a revolution in computer vision, so let’s never forget that open data sets can be useful.
  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news
    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.