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Automate podcast publishing with Python

Monday 17th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

I have a podcast on which I chat with both Red Hat colleagues and a variety of industry experts on topics from cloud to DevOps to containers to IoT to open source. Over time, I've gotten the recording and editing process pretty streamlined. When it comes to the mechanics of actually putting the podcast online, however, there are a lot of fussy little steps that need to be followed precisely.


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How to draw primitive shapes with BRL-CAD

Monday 17th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

A primitive is a basic shape that has a unique polynomial equation within a CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software package used for geometric modeling of more complex shapes. Examples include an ellipse, a sphere, a torus, a square, and in our case a heart-shaped primitive with a sextic equation (a polynomial, which has six roots).


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Summit preparations, Technical Committee elections, and more OpenStack news

Monday 17th of April 2017 05:00:00 AM

Welcome to Opensource.com's monthly look at what's happening in the world of OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project. We bring together a collection of news, events, and happenings from the developer listserv all in one handy package. Do you have a suggestion for something for us to include next month? Let us know in the comments below

OpenStack news and happenings

There's a lot being written about OpenStack. Here are a few highlights.


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Ubuntu ditches Unity, Maryland embraces open textbooks, and more open source news

Saturday 15th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Ubuntu going back to GNOME, universities in Maryland getting open textbook grants, and more.

Open source news roundup for April 2-14, 2017
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Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

Friday 14th of April 2017 01:55:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

Top 5 articles of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps


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5 projects for Raspberry Pi at home

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:03:00 AM

The Raspberry Pi computer can be used in all kinds of settings and for a variety of purposes. It obviously has a place in education for helping students with learning programming and maker skills in the classroom and the hackspace, and it has plenty of industrial applications in the workplace and in factories. I'm going to introduce five projects you might want to build in your own home.


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A guide to packing and preparing for a tech conference

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Spring has sprung in the Northern Hemisphere, meaning tech conference season is just around the corner. LinuxFest Northwest, OSCON, OpenStack Summit, Write the Docs, and PyCon US are just a few of the inspiring events happening in the next few weeks.


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A Linux-friendly DAC and headphone amplifier for listening to music

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

This month I'm taking a bit of a break from my tagging journey to look at the latest gizmo in my house—a new DAC (digital-to-analog converter).


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8 new blog posts on how to encourage new contributors

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Help us collect community knowledge by blogging about the weekly community management theme. Blog posts are due the following Thursday after each new theme is announced.

 


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3 open source boilerplate web design templates

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:03:00 AM

In the olden days, creating a website from scratch was easy.

With a basic understanding of HTML, and maybe a little CSS, you could put together a pretty functional web page with very little effort. Throw it onto your web server, and you were good to go.


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How to install and use MuseScore to create your own music

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Last year in March, I wrote about MuseScore, a great open source application for musical notation. At the time, I was still using version 1, but since then I've upgraded to 2.0.3, and I've found that MuseScore version 2 provides a refined user interface and a healthy dose of polish to nearly every feature.

MuseScore is a stable, long-lived application, and that's a good thing because it means you can spend your time writing music instead of worrying about weekly updates pushing you toward the "cutting edge."


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Openness is key to working with Gen Z

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

Leaders and managers everywhere collectively groan with the thought of a new cohort to manage. Boomers and Gen Xers typically try to align the new kids on the block with Millennials—which would be a mistake. While Gen Z and Millennials have similarities, their motivators and influencers are vastly different. Each of the differences affects attraction, recruitment and retention of Gen Z talent.

Could open organizational models by the keys to seeing this generation excel in the workplace?

Let’s take a look.


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12 ways to study a new programming language

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

So, you've decided that you want to add a particular programming language to your repertoire. Now what?

In this article, I outline 12 suggestions for study techniques. Remember that everybody learns differently. Some of these techniques may work excellently for you, whereas others may not meet your needs at all. If you start to feel stuck with one strategy, try another and see where it gets you.


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Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

Wednesday 12th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

As a longtime user of Chromebooks, I know how useful and convenient those devices can be. They're light, the hardware is solid, and Chromebooks are excellent devices to carry while traveling or working on the go.

The main drawback of Chromebooks, though, is how tightly they're tied to Google's services. Over the last little while, I've been steadily de-Googlizing my life. One of the last big obstacles to doing that has been my Chromebook.


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How OpenStack releases get their names

Wednesday 12th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

What's in a name?

Quite a bit, actually. Open source projects frequently struggle to find a name that's suitably memorable, descriptive, appropriate, and, above all else, does not find the project in accidental legal trouble.


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Getting started with Jekyll, a free and open source static site generator

Wednesday 12th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Jekyll is a free and open source static site generator. Like a content management system (for example, Drupal and WordPress), Jekyll can be used to build websites with rich and easy-to-use navigation. Unlike Drupal and WordPress, however, Jekyll generates all the content at once, instead of waiting for people to visit your website's pages.


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Python vs. Ruby: Which is best for web development?

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Python and Ruby are among some of the most popular programming languages for developing websites, web-based apps, and web services.

In many ways, the two languages have a lot in common. Visually they are quite similar, and both provide programmers with high-level, object-oriented coding, an interactive shell, standard libraries, and persistence support. However, Python and Ruby are worlds apart in their approach to solving problems because their syntax and philosophies vary greatly, primarily because of their respective histories.


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How to program games with the LÖVE gaming engine on the Raspberry Pi

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

The Raspberry Pi is famous for introducing kids to open source software and programming. The Pi is an affordable, practical introduction to professional-grade computing, disguised as hackable fun.


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What to do when your open source hobby becomes a project

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Many software developers have their own side projects, which are often open source projects. When those open source hobbies grow too big, how do developers manage them?

All open business and projects face this problem: If they grow too big, more members are necessary for carrying the collective load. Their strategies for scaling are important.

One popular open source community recently faced this problem. And the way that community surmounted it teaches us something about the art of scaling an open organization.


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Top 10 and editor's picks: March review

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 06:00:00 AM

Opensource.com brought in 666,696 unique visitors who generated 1,115,124 page views in March, our sixth consecutive month with more than 1,000,000 page views.

We published 90 articles in March, including 12 that were a part of our Raspberry Pi series, which is always one of our reader favorites.

We welcomed 20 new authors, and almost 65% of our content was contributed by members of the open source community. Our community moderators contributed 19 articles.


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More in Tux Machines

Manjaro Linux: Reliable and Up to Date, Geekdom Optional

Regular readers can pretty much ignore this one. We’ll be back to cartoons, O’s baseball and the usual inanity soon, tomorrow in fact. I just wanted to revisit my dedication to Linux, prompted by a recent mixed bag of experiences that left me feeling even more positive about a relative newcomer to the distro scene: Manjaro. It all started a few days ago, when I decided to finally try to update the eight remaining Linux installs on my main desktop PC. I’ve been using Linux Mint (18.1 Cinnamon) as my daily driver for several months, originally in an attempt to keep my bandwidth usage to a reasonable level, and then due to inertia/lack of issues. I could have gone with my trusty Debian stable install, my go-to for years up till then, but I guess I was just getting bored. Read more

Kirigami 2.1

  • Kirigami 2.1 [Ed: post removed, maybe temporarily/by accident]
  • KDE Kirigami 2.1 Released To Help Build Convergent Linux Apps
    While convergence may be dead at Ubuntu/Canonical, KDE developers continue working on Plasma Mobile and their convergence vision driven in part by the Kirigami user-interface framework.
  • Kirigami 2.1 Open-Source Framework for Convergent Mobile and Desktop UIs Is Out
    KDE's Paul Brown announced the general availability of version 2.1 of the open-source Kirigami UI framework for producing convergent user interfaces for mobile and desktop environments. Kirigami 2.1 is here three and a half months after the launch of Kirigami 2.0 as the project's most mature version to date. Prominent features include ItemViewHeader, a standardized title for ListViews, which can be customized with a background image that uses a parallax effect when scrolled and the header is adjusted accordingly. Multiple behaviors can be set for this component.

What is SSH Key? How To Generate SSH Key in Linux?

SSH is short for Secure Shell. Secure Shell is a network protocol that provides administrators with a secure way (with encryption) to access a remote computer. it allows an administrator to log into virtual space server with an SSH key instead of a typical password. This eliminates the usual weakness of cracking passwords since SSHs almost can not be deciphered or cracked. So how exactly does this work? Let's find out in this tutorial. Read
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today's leftovers

  • Pinebook - 1st review
    So I got the Pinebook 11 inch with arm 64 bits..... And what can I say, I am amazed with the quality of the construction. Very good plastics, better than some chromebooks and cheap windows netbooks. The mousepad is outstanding and work really nice. The keyboard, only has one problem!! The right shift. Probably I will remap the shift to the "/" position. I use and abuse right shift (i rarely use the left one), so this is very important to me.
  • DevOps lab: Learn to use GitHub for infrastructure deployments
    This article is part of a series to help IT ops professionals learn DevOps by building a home lab. In the second step, Git version control allows ops to manage infrastructure as code.
  • IBM Advances OpenWhisk Serverless Vision
    The computing paradigm commonly known as 'serverless' computing isn't for everyone, but it does have a place and plenty of opportunities for those willing to explore. IBM has its own serverless platform called OpenWhisk which first became generally available in December 2016. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Jason McGee, VP and CTO for IBM Cloud platform discusses the opportunities for serverless, event-driven computing and where the technology intersects with Watson cognitive computing and the application container revolutions.
  • Linux Foundation Announces EdgeX Foundry To Drive Standardization Of Edge Computing
  • Awesomenauts, the side-scrolling MOBA is going free to play next month
  • Everything, a game about experiencing, well, everything and it's now on Linux
    I personally tested it out and it was an absolute joy. From the very first moment, to the moment I put it down to write some thoughts it was incredible. Especially fun when it says "Everything is loaded" at the start which made me chuckle. Simple things right?
  • [New but undated] Linux distros (Linux distribution)
    A Linux distribution -- often shortened to "Linux distro" -- is a version of the open source Linux operating system that is packaged with other components, such as an installation programs, management tools and additional software such as the KVM hypervisor.
  • [Tumbleweed] Review of the weeks 2017/13 – 17
    And all this happens in parallel to the openSUSE Conference being planned. You should think about participating! It is always informative, a lot of discussions happen in face-to-face meetings and, in openSUSE’s tradition, everybody is having a lot of fun. If you can plan a visit, you absolute should do so.
  • Red Hat Gives JBoss AMQ a Makeover
    Red Hat on Thursday announced JBoss AMQ 7, a messaging platform upgrade that enhances its overall performance and improves client availability for developers. JBoss AMQ is a lightweight, standards-based open source platform designed to enable real-time communication between applications, services, devices and the Internet of Things. It is based on the upstream Apache ActiveMQ and Apache Qpid community projects.
  • Fedora Atomic Host available in Digital Ocean
  • Automated *non*-critical path update functional testing for Fedora
  • Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Just Around the Corner, Live Images to Support UEFI
    Debian Project's Steve McIntyre and Jonathan Wiltshire just informed the Debian GNU/Linux community about some of the important aspects of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, whose launch is imminent. The first aspect, revealed by Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire, is that the final release of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" might not include Secure Boot support, which is no longer a blocker to launch the forthcoming OS. However, Secure Boot support could be implemented sometime during the lifetime of Debian 9.