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Calling subs and typing in Perl 6

Friday 28th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

This is the ninth article in a series about migrating code from Perl 5 to Perl 6. This article examines the subtle differences in visibility of subroutines between Perl 5 and Perl 6 and the (gradual) typing core feature of Perl 6.


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What is BigchainDB?

Friday 28th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Sophia Armstrong, a computer science major at East Carolina University, provided an overview of BigchainDB in her Lightning Talk, "Blockchain database for a cybersecurity learning environment," at All Things Open 2018, October 23 in Raleigh, NC.


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Most-read coverage in 2018: Legal issues and the open source community

Friday 28th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

In 2018, Opensource.com again tackled the intersection of open source and the law, with the most-read articles addressing topics from privacy to patents.

One of the most impactful legal changes in 2018 was the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), so it's not surprising that many readers were interested in how the new law will affect open source communities.


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The mantra for this year's sysadmin: Work smarter, not harder

Thursday 27th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

Being a systems administrator is not an easy job. Sysadmins often have to design, build, monitor, and maintain a large array of disparate services running on a patchwork of platforms. Most sysadmins come into the field by happy accident, so they sometimes lack formal, organized training on the toolsets.


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The people, processes, and tools of DevOps in 2018

Thursday 27th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

I could not be happier with the band of merry DevOps, Site Reliability Engineering (SRE), and agile folks that have formed under the Opensource.com DevOps banner. Folks from around the globe have assembled to write about the people, processes, and tools they've encountered along their DevOps journeys. It is heartwarming to see so many people willing to share their experiences. This is what DevOps is all about! Better outcomes don't come from inside an organization. Better outcomes arise from shared continuous learning.


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Top advice for securing your systems in 2019

Thursday 27th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

It's been an interesting year for security and users. It all kicked off at the beginning of the year with Facebook and Cambridge Analytica causing people suddenly to think more seriously about their data and what they share on social media. In fact, the threat against personal data has been an important theme for the year. We've seen breaches at companies such as Marriott (in December) and British Airways (September) and Under Armour (March).


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Maximize your Ansible skills with these 7 how-tos

Wednesday 26th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

Ansible is a powerful, agentless (but easy-to-use and lightweight) automation tool that’s been steadily gaining popularity since its introduction in 2012. This popularity is due in part to its simplicity.  Ansible’s most basic dependencies, Python and SSH, are available by default almost everywhere, making it easy to use Ansible for a wide range of systems: servers, workstations, Raspberry Pis, industrial controllers, Linux containers, network devices, and so on.


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Getting started with chaos engineering: 3 top reads in 2018

Wednesday 26th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

"Resilience is the story of the outage that didn’t happen." -John Allspaw

Our systems are becoming more and more distributed, ephemeral, and immutable in how they function in today’s ever-evolving landscape of contemporary engineering practices. Our world is becoming more complex, but the rate of velocity at which our systems interact and evolve is making work more challenging for humans. In this new paradigm, it is becoming problematic to comprehend the operational state, health, and safety of our systems.


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Gaming for Linux, Raspberry Pi, and open source: Top reads of the year

Wednesday 26th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

It's been a good year for gaming and Linux. For one thing, it's become much easier to play proprietary games on Linux in recent years, but open source gaming has also seen many advances, thanks in part to a retro gaming renaissance. If you are a gamer and an open source advocate, Opensource.com's top 11 gaming articles of 2018 (listed below) will help you enjoy your games and support open source at the same time.


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sed 's/docker/containers/g'

Wednesday 26th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

As one of the first container platforms available, Docker quickly racked up enormous market share. Not to knock Docker, but "alternatives are good," says Chris Collins, an automation engineer at Duke University.


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6 years of Raspberry Pi

Tuesday 25th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

The Raspberry Pi was an instant success when it launched in 2012, with 100,000 of the low-cost computers ordered on the first day and 1 million sold in its first year, says Ben Nuttall, community manager of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The devices and the foundation that backs it have come a long way in just six years, with regular hardware updates, a vibrant community, and an untiring dedication to giving students and teachers inexpensive tools for learning to code.


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10 most popular stories on open leadership

Tuesday 25th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

In 2018, the open organization community added more than 50 articles to its growing corpus of resources for leaders, managers, and changemakers reinventing their organizations the open source way. All the pieces were excellent, but readers gravitated to the following ten in particular.


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The 12 days of working from home over the holidays

Tuesday 25th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Disclaimer: The author refuses to take any blame for any resulting disciplinary or legal action taken against readers who follow any of the suggestions in this article.


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The definitive pronunciation guide for kubectl

Monday 24th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

If you've ever labored over how to pronounce unpronounceable IT terms, H. "Waldo" Grunenwald has your back.

In his humorous Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2018, "'kubectl': The definitive pronunciation guide," Waldo offers over a dozen ways to pronounce "kubectl" before landing on the right answer.

Want to know how to say it? Watch Waldo's talk.


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Go on an adventure in your Linux terminal

Monday 24th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Today is the final day of our 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. Hopefully, you've been following along, but if not, start back at the beginning and work your way through. You'll find plenty of games, diversions, and oddities for your Linux terminal.

And while you may have seen some toys from our calendar before, we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

Today's toy was suggested by Opensource.com moderator Joshua Allen Holm:


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8 Python conferences to attend in 2019

Monday 24th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

There are a lot of reasons to go to tech conferences, and even more of a reason to go to a conference focused specifically on your chosen programming language. My favorite is Python.

Rather than rehash all the various reasons why conferences are great and you should attend, I'll go right into which Python conferences you might want to show up to in 2019.


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The most popular articles on agile in 2018

Monday 24th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

2018 featured some fantastic content for agile aficionados, from techniques and tricks to run more focused and outcome-driven retrospectives to how Coding Dojos gave agilists a new perspective.

Here’s our list of the top five most-read agile articles in 2018 (plus a few you might have missed):


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The Linux command line can fetch fun from afar

Sunday 23rd of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

We're almost to the end of our 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. Hopefully, you've been following along, but if not, start back at the beginning and work your way through. You'll find plenty of games, diversions, and oddities for your Linux terminal.

And while you may have seen some toys from our calendar before, we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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Automated Compliance Tooling project announced, Code California launches, Tor funding, and more news

Saturday 22nd of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look open source compliance projects coming together, California launching an open source code site, the Tor Project opening its books, and more.


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Watch YouTube videos at the Linux terminal

Saturday 22nd of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

We're almost to the end of our 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. Hopefully, you've been following along, but if not, start back at the beginning and work your way through. You'll find plenty of games, diversions, and oddities for your Linux terminal.

And while you may have seen some toys from our calendar before, we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more

Programming: Homebrew 1.9, JBoss EAP, Python, Qt and Inclusion

  • Homebrew 1.9 Adds Linux Support, Auto-Cleanup, and More
    The latest release of popular macOS package manager Homebrew includes support for Linux, optional automatic package cleanup, and extended binary package support. Linux support, merged from the Linuxbrew project, is still in beta and will become stable in version 2.0. It also enables the use of Homebrew on Windows 10 systems with the Windows Subsystem for Linux installed. Auto-cleanup is meant to optimize disk space occupation by removing all intermediate data that Homebrew generates when installing packages. This can be a significant amount when Homebrew actually builds the packages from sources instead of just installing binaries. Auto-cleanup is opt-in by setting the HOMEBREW_INSTALL_CLEANUP. This behaviour will become opt-out in version 2.0, where you will be able to set the HOMEBREW_NO_INSTALL_CLEANUP environment variable to disable auto-cleanup.
  • Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1
  • Counteracting Code Complexity With Wily - Episode 195
    As we build software projects, complexity and technical debt are bound to creep into our code. To counteract these tendencies it is necessary to calculate and track metrics that highlight areas of improvement so that they can be acted on. To aid in identifying areas of your application that are breeding grounds for incidental complexity Anthony Shaw created Wily. In this episode he explains how Wily traverses the history of your repository and computes code complexity metrics over time and how you can use that information to guide your refactoring efforts.
  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.3.1 Released
    The Qt VS Tools version 2.3.1 has now been released to the Visual Studio Marketplace.
  • Ben Cotton: Inclusion is a necessary part of good coding
    Too often I see comments like “some people would rather focus on inclusion than write good code.” Not only is that a false dichotomy, but it completely misrepresents the relationship between the two. Inclusion doesn’t come at the cost of good code, it’s a necessary part of good code. We don’t write code for the sake of writing code. We write code for people to use it in some way. This means that the code needs to work for the people. In order to do that, the people designing and implementing the technology need to consider different experiences. The best way to do that is to have people with different experiences be on the team. As my 7th grade algebra teacher was fond of reminding us: garbage in, garbage out.

Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux
    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time. Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.
  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support
    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.
  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve
    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey. In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.