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Updated: 27 min 11 sec ago

How subroutine signatures work in Perl 6

Wednesday 12th of September 2018 07:01:00 AM

In the first article in this series comparing Perl 5 to Perl 6, we looked into some of the issues you might encounter when migrating code into Perl 6. In the second article, we examined how garbage collection works in Perl 6, and in the third article, we looked at how containers replaced references in Perl 6.


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Injecting chaos experiments into security log pipelines

Wednesday 12th of September 2018 07:00:00 AM

Security teams depend on high-quality logs for most preventative security efforts. Preventing an incident from occurring requires observable insight into where the failure might come from, and logs are one important source for such insights. When an incident occurs, organizations must be able to respond and contain them as quickly as possible. Logs are not only essential to find the source of a problem, but they also help identify appropriate countermeasures.


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What the gamer means to open source coder culture

Tuesday 11th of September 2018 11:30:00 AM

The first episode of Season 2 of the Command Line Heroes podcast drops today. (New episodes will be available every other week, and there's also bonus material you can get via the newsletter.) The new season focuses on seven big influencers that have shaped IT infrastructure and modern development over the last 40 years.


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Open Jam, the open source game jam, returns for 2018

Tuesday 11th of September 2018 11:30:00 AM

Team Scripta is back with the second annual Open Jam, a game jam that promotes open source games and game creation tools.

Open Jam 2018 will run from October 5th-8th.

What is a game jam?

Game jams are similar to hackathons, but for creating video games. Some are in-person, but most are online. They come in many shapes and sizes, but usually have a theme to base the games on, a set amount of time to complete them, and a judging process that helps creators get feedback.


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Running Apache Cassandra on Kubernetes

Tuesday 11th of September 2018 07:01:00 AM

As Kubernetes becomes the de facto solution for container orchestration, more and more developers (and enterprises) want to run Apache Cassandra databases on Kubernetes. It's easy to get started—especially given the capabilities that Kubernetes' StatefulSets bring to the table.


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Mozilla identifies 10 open source personas: What you need to know

Tuesday 11th of September 2018 07:00:00 AM

Participating in open source communities—or in any open organization, for that matter—means collaborating with others who might not operate the same way you do. Their motivations may differ. Their governance models might seem foreign. Their goals might not immediately speak to you. So if you're going to work together, you'll need to develop a clear sense of what makes the project tick—and decide quickly whether working together is best for your team and your business.


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Improve productivity with zsh, rugged DevOps tools, Python libraries, vim, shell dotfile, Linux commands, and more

Monday 10th of September 2018 03:59:00 PM

Opensource.com's Open Source Guide to DevOps Monitoring Tools is a free download for sysadmins. The guide includes chapters on monitoring, log aggregation, visualization, and distributed tracing tools.

Do you have an idea for a free download you'd like to see on the site? Let us know: open@opensource.com.


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18 Python programming books for beginners and veterans

Monday 10th of September 2018 07:02:00 AM

Who knew there were so many helpful books out there for Python programmers? This curated list is just a drop in the bucket. As you may know, Python is soaring in popularity.

Let's just say, it might be a good idea to get started learning more about Python soon or buffing up on your Python skills. So, I asked our writer community to share their top recommendations. Surprisingly, I only received one duplicate out of nineteen responses.


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3 open source log aggregation tools

Monday 10th of September 2018 07:01:00 AM

How is metrics aggregation different from log aggregation? Can’t logs include metrics? Can’t log aggregation systems do the same things as metrics aggregation systems?

These are questions I hear often. I’ve also seen vendors pitching their log aggregation system as the solution to all observability problems. Log aggregation is a valuable tool, but it isn’t normally a good tool for time-series data.


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Are WAV files really better than FLAC?

Monday 10th of September 2018 07:00:00 AM

If you lurk around enough audiophile-related sites, you may stumble upon writers claiming a difference in sound between the same music played back in FLAC or WAV format. This article on The Well-Tempered Computer does a nice job of exploring this concept, both from the perspective of those who don't believe such a thing is possible and from those who think there is a difference.

Without reprising the whole article, there seem to be two parts to this opinion:


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Top 10 August must-reads: 15 time-saving command-line aliases, i3 window manager, Python, Linux, containers, Mu, EduBlocks, GNOME, Raspberry Pi, and more

Friday 7th of September 2018 06:17:00 PM

Opensource.com brought in a record 885,642 unique visitors who generated a record 1,429,381 page views in August. We published 94 articles last month, and welcomed 19 new authors. Almost 65% of our content was contributed by members of the open source community, and our community moderators contributed 20 articles.


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Linux users: How long has it been since you last used Windows?

Friday 7th of September 2018 07:03:00 AM

If you're a Linux user and have been for years, sometimes you can forget that much of the desktop world is still on Windows.

Or perhaps it's not so hard to remember.

Many of us hold day jobs where we're not lucky enough to be able to choose our own operating system and are stuck with whatever IT has gifted us. Or, perhaps, you still keep an old Windows PC around for running that one application that just isn't available on Linux.


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Program an IoT pushbutton with a DIY Blynk Board

Friday 7th of September 2018 07:02:00 AM

In my previous article, I explained how to set up a DIY Blynk Board using an ESP8266 based microcontroller. Blynk is an easy way to start creating Internet of Things projects. It's not tied to any specific board, so you can use the platform to control Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and other hardware of your choice over the internet.


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6 open source tools for writing a book

Friday 7th of September 2018 07:01:00 AM

I first used and contributed to free and open source software in 1993, and since then I've been an open source software developer and evangelist. I've written or contributed to dozens of open source software projects, although the one that I'll be remembered for is the FreeDOS Project, an open source implementation of the DOS operating system.


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What do open source and cooking have in common?

Friday 7th of September 2018 07:00:00 AM

What’s a fun way to promote the principles of free software without actually coding? Here’s an idea: open source cooking. For the past eight years, this is what we’ve been doing in Munich.

The idea of open source cooking grew out of our regular open source meetups because we realized that cooking and free software have a lot in common.


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Two open source alternatives to Flash Player

Thursday 6th of September 2018 07:03:00 AM

In July 2017, Adobe sounded the death knell for its Flash Media Player, announcing it would end support for the once-ubiquitous online video player in 2020. In truth, however, Flash has been on the decline for the past eight years following a rash of zero-day attacks that damaged its reputation. Its future dimmed after Apple announced in 2010 it would not support the technology, and its demise accelerated in 2016 after Google stopped enabling Flash by default (in favor of HTML5) in the Chrome browser.


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What a shell dotfile can do for you

Thursday 6th of September 2018 07:02:00 AM

Ask not what you can do for your shell dotfile, but what a shell dotfile can do for you!

I've been all over the OS map, but for the past several years my daily drivers have been Macs. For a long time, I used Bash, but when a few friends started proselytizing zsh, I gave it a shot. It didn't take long for me to appreciate it, and several years later, I strongly prefer it for many of the little things that it does.


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3 top open source JavaScript chart libraries

Thursday 6th of September 2018 07:01:00 AM

Charts and graphs are important for visualizing data and making websites appealing. Visual presentations make it easier to analyze big chunks of data and convey information. JavaScript chart libraries enable you to visualize data in a stunning, easy to comprehend, and interactive manner and improve your website's design.

In this article, learn about three top open source JavaScript chart libraries.


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DevOps: The consequences of blame

Thursday 6th of September 2018 07:00:00 AM

Merriam-Webster defines "blame" as both a verb and a noun. As a verb, it means "to find fault with or to hold responsible." As a noun, it means "an expression of disapproval or responsibility for something believed to deserve censure."

Either way, blame isn’t a pleasant thing. It can create feelings of fear and shame, foster power imbalances, and cause us to devalue others.


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5 tips to improve productivity with zsh

Wednesday 5th of September 2018 07:03:00 AM

The Z shell known as zsh is a shell for Linux/Unix-like operating systems. It has similarities to other shells in the sh (Bourne shell) family, such as as bash and ksh, but it provides many advanced features and powerful command line editing options, such as enhanced Tab completion.


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More in Tux Machines

What’s New in Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Ubuntu budgie. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 flavor this release ships with latest Budgie desktop 10.4 as default desktop environment. Powered by Linux 4.15 kernel and shipping with the same internals as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), the Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS official flavor will be supported for 3 years, until April 2021. Prominent new features include support for adding OpenVNC connections through the NetworkManager applet, better font handling for Chinese and Korean languages, improved keyboard shortcuts, color emoji support for GNOME Characters and other GNOME apps, as well as window-shuffler capability. Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS also ships with a new exciting GTK+ theme by default called Pocillo, support for dynamic workspaces, as well as a “minimal installation” option in the graphical installer that lets users install Ubuntu Budgie with only the Chromium web browser and a handful of basic system utilities. Read more

Red Hat: Boston, US Government, OpenShift Route, VirtualBox and More

  • BU Spark! teams up with Red Hat, hosts software design workshop
    Students traveled across Boston to its Fort Point neighborhood to attend a BU Spark! workshop about interaction design Friday. There they delved into interaction design and explored how to develop user-friendly software. BU Spark! and Red Hat Inc. hosted the Interaction Design Bootcamp jointly at Red Hat’s Boston office. BU students and Spark! Interaction design fellows attended. Red Hat is a software company that specializes in information technology and has a research relationship with Boston University that includes educational elements. The programs taught by Red Hat focus on user experience design, one of Red Hat’s specializations, according to their website.
  • Open source can spark innovative business transformation in government, Red Hat leaders say
    The federal government, largely hamstrung by legacy systems, is in need of a major digital transformation. Open source technology can be the spark that sets off that revolution, leaders from open-source software company Red Hat said Tuesday. “The types of technologies that you choose matter,” said Mike Walker, global director of Open Innovation Labs at Red Hat. “It will influence the way your business operates and open new doors to new business process, and ultimately allow you to become a software company that can achieve some of those innovations and reductions in cost and time.”
  • Kubernetes Ingress vs OpenShift Route
    Although pods and services have their own IP addresses on Kubernetes, these IP addresses are only reachable within the Kubernetes cluster and not accessible to the outside clients. The Ingress object in Kubernetes, although still in beta, is designed to signal the Kubernetes platform that a certain service needs to be accessible to the outside world and it contains the configuration needed such as an externally-reachable URL, SSL, and more. Creating an ingress object should not have any effects on its own and requires an ingress controller on the Kubernetes platform in order to fulfill the configurations defined by the ingress object. Here at Red Hat, we saw the need for enabling external access to services before the introduction of ingress objects in Kubernetes, and created a concept called Route for the same purpose (with additional capabilities such as splitting traffic between multiple backends, sticky sessions, etc). Red Hat is one of the top contributors to the Kubernetes community and contributed the design principles behind Routes to the community which heavily influenced the Ingress design.
  • VirtualBox DRM/KMS Driver Proceeding With Atomic Mode-Setting Support
    The "vboxvideo" DRM/KMS driver for use by VirtualBox guest virtual machines that has been part of the mainline Linux kernel the past several cycles will soon see atomic mode-setting support. Hans de Goede of Red Hat, who has been stewarding this driver into the Linux kernel after Oracle has failed to do so, is tackling the atomic mode-setting as his latest advancement to this driver important for a VirtualBox desktop VM experience. Published today were initial patches preparing the move to atomic mode-setting but not yet the full migration to this modern display API that offers numerous benefits.
  • A Roadblock Ahead? – Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Ingersoll-Rand Plc (IR)
  • Red Hat Shares Have Even Upside-Downside Profile, JPMorgan Says In Downgrade
  • Earnings Preview: Red Hat poised to deliver earnings growth for Q2
  • J.P. Morgan Securities Slams Red Hat Stock With Downgrade Before Earnings
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Moves Lower on Volume Spike for September 18

IBM Looking to Distract From Recent Reports That it Helped Police Racially Profile the Public (by Openwashing)

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

  • Linux Patches Surface For Supporting The Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5
    Last year Creative Labs introduced the Sound BlasterX AE-5 PCI Express gaming sound card while finally there are some patches pending for supporting this high-end sound card in Linux. Connor McAdams who most recently got the Creative Recon3D support into good shape on Linux has now been working on getting the Sound BlasterX AE-5 working well on Linux.
  • Blockchain Training Takes Off
    Meanwhile, job postings related to blockchain and Hyperledger are taking off, and knowledge in these areas is translating into opportunity. Careers website Glassdoor lists thousands of job posts related to blockchain.
  • AMD Picasso Support Comes To The RadeonSI OpenGL Driver
    Last week AMD sent out initial support for yet-to-be-released "Picasso" APUs with the Linux AMDGPU kernel graphics driver. Today on the user-space side the support was merged for the OpenGL RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. Picasso details are still fairly light but they are expected to be similar to Raven Ridge and for the AM4 processor socket as well as an edition for notebooks. On the same day as publishing the Picasso AMDGPU kernel patches, AMD also went ahead and published the Linux patches for the "Raven 2" APUs too.
  • The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Arrives For Linux Benchmarking
    It looks like NVIDIA has their launch-day Linux support in order for the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" graphics cards slated to ship later this week as arriving today at Phoronix was the RTX 2080 Ti. The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is NVIDIA's new flagship desktop GPU with the Turing GPU architecture, 4352 CUDA cores, a 1635MHz boost clock speed rating for this Founder's Edition model, 11GB of GDDR6 video memory yielding a 616 GB/s memory bandwidth rating, and designed to suit real-time ray-tracing workloads with their RTX technology. Pricing on the RTX 2080 Ti Founder's Edition is $1,199 USD. Last week NVIDIA published more details on the Turing architecture for those interested as well as on the new mesh shader capability.