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Linux Hardware Reviews & News
Updated: 28 min 34 sec ago

AMD Sends Out Initial Linux Driver Support For "Renoir" APUs

Friday 9th of August 2019 04:31:43 PM
AMD is striking well over the past month with their Linux hardware bring-up. In the past month we've seen the Navi 10/12/14 support get in order for Linux as well as support for the future Vega-based Arcturus GPU and now we see the initial enablement patches for their next-generation APUs, Renoir...

GCC vs. LLVM Clang vs. AOCC Compiler Benchmarks On The AMD EPYC 7742

Friday 9th of August 2019 11:00:01 AM
While AMD's hardware folks were launching the EPYC 7002 series, their software crew was pushing out the AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler 2.0 with support/optimizations for the Zen 2 micro-architecture. Using the top-end AMD EPYC 7742 in a 2P Linux server configuration, here are C/C++ compiler benchmarks looking at the performance when built by the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), LLVM Clang, and AOCC 2.0.

F2FS Case-Insensitive Support Is Pending Ahead Of The Linux 5.4 Kernel

Friday 9th of August 2019 10:00:00 AM
EXT4 set off the new trend for opt-in, per-directory case-insensitive file/folder support on Linux systems. EXT4 picked up that optional case-insensitive support for Linux 5.2 while the for Linux 5.4 kernel cycle the Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) is set to receive similar support...

A Modern Supermicro Kabylake Xeon Motherboard Now Supports Coreboot

Friday 9th of August 2019 09:27:23 AM
While the tide may be eventually turning, as it stands today for those wanting to run Coreboot on x86 desktop/server hardware you are largely limited to generations-old platforms. But now there is a new option and that is a Coreboot port having been completed to a modern Supermicro motherboard for use with Intel Xeon "Kabylake" processors...

Sway 1.2-RC1 Released For The i3-Inspired Wayland Compositor

Friday 9th of August 2019 09:03:39 AM
Drew DeVault is working on buttoning up the Sway 1.2 Wayland compositor release as the newest feature update to this i3 window manager inspired compositor...

Ubuntu's Yaru Desktop Theme Seeing Updates - Big Update Against GTK's Latest Adwaita

Friday 9th of August 2019 08:53:02 AM
Canonical's designers have been working to update their Yaru desktop theme ahead of the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" release...

Proton 4.11-2 Pulls In Newest DXVK While Fixing High Refresh Rates For Older Games

Thursday 8th of August 2019 08:12:40 PM
Following the big Proton 4.11 update for Valve's Steam Play that just arrived over one week ago, a second update to this Wine-derived software is now available for enhancing the Windows games on Linux experience...

Summing Up The AMD EPYC 7742 2P Performance In One Graphic

Thursday 8th of August 2019 04:00:00 PM
If you didn't have a chance since last night to check out our benchmarks of the AMD EPYC 7742 and EPYC 7502 Linux performance, I certainly encourage you to do so. Even if you aren't a server enthusiast, it's incredible to see the engineering achievement of AMD with Zen 2 and how the race is certainly back on in the CPU space. If you are short on time, here's the quick summary of our initial AMD EPYC 7002 benchmark results...

Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Released - Switches To Using 19.04's Linux 5.0 HWE

Thursday 8th of August 2019 02:14:47 PM
Canonical has announced the immediate availability of Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS as the newest update to this long-term support series...

How Can AMD EPYC "Rome" 7002 Series Be Even Better? Open-Source BIOS / Coreboot

Thursday 8th of August 2019 11:00:00 AM
By now you've likely seen the fantastic performance out of AMD's new "Rome" 7002 series processors. The performance is phenomenal and generally blowing well past Intel's Xeon Cascade Lake processors. So that's all good and it can get even better outside of performance: I asked AMD about the prospects of Coreboot / open-source BIOS support and got a surprising response...

LibreOffice 6.3 Released With Better Performance, UI Enhancements

Thursday 8th of August 2019 10:47:46 AM
After a slight delay, The Document Foundation this morning announced the release of the LibreOffice 6.3 cross-platform open-source office suite...

Red Hat Joins The RISC-V Foundation

Thursday 8th of August 2019 09:57:40 AM
Red Hat has joined the RISC-V Foundation to help foster this open-source processor ISA...

GTK-VNC 1.0 Released With GTK3 Requirement & Other Improvements

Thursday 8th of August 2019 09:48:19 AM
Yesterday marked the release of GTK-VNC 1.0 as GNOME's VNC viewer widget for the GTK tool-kit...

AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler 2.0 Released With Zen 2 Support

Thursday 8th of August 2019 09:37:12 AM
Coinciding with yesterday's glorious AMD EPYC "Rome" 7002 series CPU launch, AMD's software folks released AOCC 2.0 as their LLVM/Clang-based compiler optimized for Zen processors. AOCC 2.0 brings optimized compiler support now for Zen 2 processors not just only the EPYC 7002 line-up but also the Ryzen 3000 series consumer processors...

Libinput 1.14 Released With Dell Canvas Totem Support, Touchpad Improvements

Thursday 8th of August 2019 09:28:16 AM
Version 1.14 of the libinput library for unified input handling on Linux X.Org and Wayland systems is now available...

AMD EPYC 7502 + EPYC 7742 Linux Performance Benchmarks

Wednesday 7th of August 2019 11:00:09 PM
Now that you have read our AMD EPYC "Rome" 7002 series overview, here is a look at the initial performance benchmarks from our testing over the past few weeks. This testing focused on the new AMD EPYC 7502 and EPYC 7742 processors in both single (1P) and dual (2P) socket configurations using AMD's Daytona server reference platform. Tests were done on Ubuntu Linux and compared to previous AMD EPYC processors as well as Intel Xeon Scalable.

AMD EPYC 7002 Series Unveiled With Primed Linux Support & Strong Server Performance

Wednesday 7th of August 2019 11:00:00 PM
One month ago today we were talking about the AMD Ryzen 3000 series processor and new Radeon RX 5700 series graphics cards, all manufactured on TSMC's 7nm process. Today, for 7th August, the embargo has now lifted and we are talking about something arguably more exciting, or at least the ability to more profoundly impact an industry (data centers): AMD's EPYC 7002 series is ready and their line-up and ultimately the resulting performance is the most exciting and competitive we have seen ever out of AMD in the server space.

NVIDIA Starts Publishing GPU Hardware Documentation To Help Open-Source Drivers

Wednesday 7th of August 2019 06:22:51 PM
Today is a wild one for open-source/Linux users. Let's begin with the unexpected news: NVIDIA is releasing more GPU hardware documentation at long last! Yes, freely-available hardware interface documentation to assist in the development of the open-source NVIDIA Linux driver (Nouveau)...

Initial Benchmarks Of The Spectre "SWAPGS" Mitigation Performance Impact

Wednesday 7th of August 2019 01:30:07 PM
Yesterday the SWAPGS vulnerability was made public as a new variant of Spectre V1 that affects all operating systems and is believed to affect only Intel CPUs. The SWAPGS discovery by Bitdefender was quietly mitigated by Microsoft for Windows 10 last month while yesterday the patches were posted for the mainline Linux kernel as the Grand Schemozzle. As soon as learning of this SWAPGS vulnerability and seeing the kernel code, I began running some preliminary performance tests to look at the impact of this latest CPU mitigation.

Lars Knoll Shares His Technical Vision For The Qt 6 Tool-Kit

Wednesday 7th of August 2019 12:33:54 PM
Longtime KDE/Qt developer Lars Knoll (and current CTO of The Qt Company) has shared his technical vision for the upcoming Qt 6 tool-kit...

More in Tux Machines

Total War: THREE KINGDOMS Comes to GNU/Linux

Security: One More Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day, New FOSS Patches, Major Metapackage Makeover in Kali and Securing Crypto Wallets

  • One more Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day

    Not long ago I published an article about Steam vulnerability. I received a lot of feedback. But Valve didn’t say a single word, HackerOne sent a huge letter and, mostly, kept silence. Eventually things escalated with Valve and I got banned by them on HackerOne — I can no longer participate in their vulnerability rejection program (the rest of H1 is still available though).

    You can read the story in more detail in previous article, here is a couple of words about current situation.

    And it’s sad and simple — Valve keeps failing. Last patch, that should have solved the problem, can be easily bypassed (https://twitter.com/general_nfs/status/1162067274443833344) so the vulnerability still exists. Yes, I’ve checked, it works like a charm.

    But this article is not about an old vulnerability, it’s about new one. Since Valve decided to read a public report instead of private report one more time, I won’t take that pleasure away from them.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (nginx), openSUSE (ImageMagick and putty), Red Hat (Ansible, atomic-openshift-web-console, ceph, and qemu-kvm-rhev), SUSE (kvm, libssh2_org, postgresql96, qemu, and wavpack), and Ubuntu (libzstd and openjpeg2).

  • Major Metapackage Makeover

    With our 2019.3 Kali release imminent, we wanted to take a quick moment to discuss one of our more significant upcoming changes: our selection of metapackages. These alterations are designed to optimize Kali, reduce ISO size, and better organize metapackages as we continue to grow. Before we get into what’s new, let’s briefly recap what a metapackage is. A metapackage is a package that does not contain any tools itself, but rather is a dependency list of normal packages (or other metapackages). This allows us to group related tools together. For instance, if you want to be able to access every wireless tool, simply install the kali-tools-wireless metapackage.

  • Securing Your Crypto Wallet

    When it came time to create my CryptocurrencyOS, based on Linux Mint I wanted to solve some practical user and security issues. The end result was for people to have their own crypto wallets in a secure, opensource, environment and encourage more adoption of cryptocurrency. I applied some of my experience with some of the products I developed for compevo and Techrich. The first problem is that a lot of people don’t even know how to find or download a wallet (at least safely, since there are a lot of fake / malware wallets that steal people’s coins). If they don’t know how to avoid the above, then how would they be able to secure their computer?

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