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Linux Hardware Reviews & News
Updated: 1 hour 37 min ago

Hisilicon Hibmc DRM Driver Being Added For Linux 4.10

Tuesday 22nd of November 2016 11:31:46 AM
David Airlie has pulled the newest DRM/KMS driver into DRM-Next for merging in the Linux 4.10 kernel...

OpenCL Image Support For Gallium3D's Clover

Tuesday 22nd of November 2016 09:18:19 AM
While AMD hasn't been doing much work lately on the Clover-based OpenCL support with focusing their open-source OpenCL efforts around ROCm / Radeon Open Compute, Edward O'Callaghan has been working on some much-needed love for the Clover OpenCL Gallium3D state tracker...

RadeonSI Patches For Compiling Optimized Shader Variants Asynchronously

Tuesday 22nd of November 2016 05:00:08 AM
AMD developer Marek Olšák pushed his latest RadeonSI Gallium3D patch series into Mesa Git a few hours ago for further improving the open-source Radeon OpenGL driver stack...

AMD Sends Out Revised DAL Patches, Various Cleanups

Tuesday 22nd of November 2016 01:00:00 AM
The latest DAL (Display Abstraction Layer) patches are now available for testing that represent the past four weeks of work by AMD developers on working towards getting the code reworked into a state that it can be merged in the mainline Linux kernel...

GTK+ 3.89.1 Released As First Development Step Towards GTK4

Tuesday 22nd of November 2016 12:34:37 AM
Matthias Clasen tagged the release today of GTK+ 3.89.1 as the first development snapshot leading towards GTK+ 4.0...

DatArcs Is Aiming For Dynamically-Tuned, Self-Optimizing Linux Servers

Monday 21st of November 2016 07:24:09 PM
DatArcs is a new software start-up aiming to provide software to dynamically tune Linux servers for maximum performance and energy efficiency in the data-center. The DatArcs optimizer analyzes the server's workload over time and optimizes the server "several times per minute" to achieve better performance or lower power use...

AMDGPU-PRO 16.40 Tests On Deus Ex: Mankind Divided With Ubuntu 16.04

Monday 21st of November 2016 06:24:18 PM
Earlier this month when Feral released Deus Ex: Mankind Divided for Linux, the game wasn't launching with AMDGPU-PRO during my testing on Ubuntu 16.10. The game didn't start at all and would crash immediately -- unlike the NVIDIA binary driver on the same system or when ultimately running AMDGPU+RadeonSI tests for this game. Under Ubuntu 16.04 with AMDGPU-PRO 16.40, I've now got the game running...

Rspamd 1.4 Comes With Many Spam Filtering Improvements

Monday 21st of November 2016 05:06:36 PM
For those using Rspamd for open-source e-mail spam filtering, the new version 1.4 release is now available as a big, stable feature update...

Cinnamon 3.2 Desktop Officially Released

Monday 21st of November 2016 03:52:01 PM
Earlier this month we wrote when Cinnamon 3.2 was tagged in Git while now finally the Linux Mint developers have formally announced this next version of their GNOME3-derived desktop...

AMD Planning To Enable GLAMOR By Default For R600 & Newer GPUs

Monday 21st of November 2016 02:41:05 PM
Currently the xf86-video-ati DDX driver only uses GLAMOR acceleration (2D via OpenGL) when using GCN GPUs where there isn't any hardware-specific EXA 2D code-paths implemented. However, AMD developers are now planning to switch over all R600 GPUs and newer to using GLAMOR by default...

Total War: WARHAMMER Linux Requirements Announced - AMD & NVIDIA GPUs

Monday 21st of November 2016 12:51:23 PM
With Feral Interactive releasing Total War: WARHAMMER for Linux this week, today they published the system requirements...

Fedora 25 Turned Out Great, Definitely My Most Favorite Fedora Release

Monday 21st of November 2016 12:40:45 PM
While I generally wait until a few days/weeks past a Fedora release to upgrade, this past weekend I already switched my main production system over to Fedora 25 ahead of tomorrow's release. That's the first time I've been so ambitious with a Fedora release, but in testing it over the past few weeks (and months) on a multitude of test systems, the quality has been excellent and by far is most favorite release going back to the Fedora Core days -- and there's Wayland by default too, as just the icing on the cake.

NVIDIA Posts Initial Signed PMU Firmware Support Patches - Currently For GM20B

Monday 21st of November 2016 11:35:41 AM
NVIDIA developer Alexandre Courbot has sent out his latest version of Nouveau DRM patches to carry out Secure Boot refactoring of the code for dealing with NVIDIA's signed firmware requirements for Maxwell GPUs and newer. But these latest patches come with a bit of a twist...

Early Independent Benchmarks Of The MuQSS Scheduler

Monday 21st of November 2016 11:28:01 AM
MuQSS is the successor to the BFS scheduler and its first major release was last month for this scheduler that currently doesn't have any ambitions to go mainline. On OpenBenchmarking.org this weekend were some independent benchmarks of the new scheduler...

GLobjects 1.0.0 Released For OpenGL Aide

Monday 21st of November 2016 11:17:06 AM
GLobjects 1.0.0 has been released as an open-source library designed to make OpenGL usage "modern, less cluttered, and less error-prone."..

LLVM Developer Meeting 2016 Videos Posted

Monday 21st of November 2016 11:08:36 AM
The videos from the LLVM Developer Meeting 2016 conference that took place at the beginning of November are now online...

Linux 4.9-rc6 Released, Final Might Be Pushed Back By Another Week

Sunday 20th of November 2016 10:10:57 PM
The sixth weekly test release of the Linux 4.9 kernel is now available while Linus Torvalds is still deciding how many more RCs to go before officially releasing this huge kernel update...

Early Benchmarks Of AMDGPU DRM-Next Code For Linux 4.10

Sunday 20th of November 2016 04:05:58 PM
For those curious if the AMDGPU DRM driver changes that are queued in DRM-Next for Linux 4.10 will bring any performance changes, here are some early numbers...

Fedora 26 Planning For Debug Information In Static Libraries

Sunday 20th of November 2016 03:56:39 PM
With Fedora 25 set to ship this coming week, feature development for Fedora 26 continues to heat up...

Linux 4.9 Has Tear-Free PRIME Offloading Between Intel & AMDGPU

Sunday 20th of November 2016 03:46:11 PM
Quietly landing last week into the mainline Linux kernel as part of the AMDGPU fixes is support for tear-free PRIME offloading between Intel and AMDGPU...

More in Tux Machines

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Understanding SELinux Roles
    I received a container bugzilla today for someone who was attempting to assign a container process to the object_r role. Hopefully this blog will help explain how roles work with SELinux. When we describe SELinux we often concentrate on Type Enforcement, which is the most important and most used feature of SELinux. This is what describe in the SELinux Coloring book as Dogs and Cats. We also describe MLS/MCS Separation in the coloring book.
  • The Internet Society is unhappy about security – pretty much all of it
    The Internet Society (ISOC) is the latest organisation saying, in essence, “security is rubbish – fix it”. Years of big data breaches are having their impact, it seems: in its report released last week, it quotes a 54-country, 24,000-respondent survey reporting a long-term end user trend to become more fearful in using the Internet (by Ipsos on behalf of the Centre for International Governance Innovation). Report author, economist and ISOC fellow Michael Kende, reckons companies aren't doing enough to control breaches. “According to the Online Trust Alliance, 93 per cent of breaches are preventable” he said, but “steps to mitigate the cost of breaches that do occur are not taken – attackers cannot steal data that is not stored, and cannot use data that is encrypted.”
  • UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor
    Among the many unpleasant things in the Investigatory Powers Act that was officially signed into law this week, one that has not gained as much attention is the apparent ability for the UK government to undermine encryption and demand surveillance backdoors. As the bill was passing through Parliament, several organizations noted their alarm at section 217 which obliged ISPs, telcos and other communications providers to let the government know in advance of any new products and services being deployed and allow the government to demand "technical" changes to software and systems.
  • EU budget creates bug bounty programme to improve cybersecurity
    Today the European Parliament approved the EU Budget for 2017. The budget sets aside 1.9 million euros in order to improve the EU's IT infrastructure by extending the free software audit programme (FOSSA) that MEPs Max Anderson and Julia Reda initiated two years ago, and by including a bug bounty approach in the programme that was proposed by MEP Marietje Schaake.
  • Qubes OS Begins Commercialization and Community Funding Efforts
    Since the initial launch of Qubes OS back in April 2010, work on Qubes has been funded in several different ways. Originally a pet project, it was first supported by Invisible Things Lab (ITL) out of the money we earned on various R&D and consulting contracts. Later, we decided that we should try to commercialize it. Our idea, back then, was to commercialize Windows AppVM support. Unlike the rest of Qubes OS, which is licensed under GPLv2, we thought we would offer Windows AppVM support under a proprietary license. Even though we made a lot of progress on both the business and technical sides of this endeavor, it ultimately failed. Luckily, we got a helping hand from the Open Technology Fund (OTF), which has supported the project for the past two years. While not a large sum of money in itself, it did help us a lot, especially with all the work necessary to improve Qubes’ user interface, documentation, and outreach to new communities. Indeed, the (estimated) Qubes user base has grown significantly over that period. Thank you, OTF!
  • Linux Security Basics: What System Administrators Need to Know
    Every new Linux system administrator needs to learn a few core concepts before delving into the operating system and its applications. This short guide gives a summary of some of the essential security measures that every root user must know. All advice given follows the best security practices that are mandated by the community and the industry.
  • BitUnmap: Attacking Android Ashmem
    The law of leaky abstractions states that “all non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky”. In this blog post we’ll explore the ashmem shared memory interface provided by Android and see how false assumptions about its internal operation can result in security vulnerabilities affecting core system code.

GNU/FSF

  • The Three Software Freedoms
    The government can help us by making software companies distribute the source code. They can say it's "in the interest of national security". And they can sort out the patent system (there are various problems with how the patent system handles software which are out of the scope of this article). So when you chat to your MP please mention this.
  • Leapfrog Honoring the GPL
  • A discussion on GPL compliance
    Among its many activities, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) is one of the few organizations that does any work on enforcing the GPL when other compliance efforts have failed. A suggestion by SFC executive director Karen Sandler to have a Q&A session about compliance and enforcement at this year's Kernel Summit led to a prolonged discussion, but not to such a session being added to the agenda. However, the co-located Linux Plumbers Conference set up a "birds of a feather" (BoF) session so that interested developers could hear more about the SFC's efforts, get their questions answered, and provide feedback. Sandler and SFC director of strategic initiatives Brett Smith hosted the discussion, which was quite well-attended—roughly 70 people were there at a 6pm BoF on November 3.
  • Join us as a member to give back for the free software you use
    At the FSF, we run our own infrastructure using only free software, which makes us stand out from nearly every other nonprofit organization. Virtually all others rely on outside providers and use a significant amount of nonfree software. With your support, we set an example proving that a nonprofit can follow best practices while running only free software.
  • The Free Software Foundation is in need of members

today's howtos