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Linux Hardware Reviews & News
Updated: 1 hour 24 min ago

Reiser4 File-System Port Updated For The Linux 5.1 + Linux 5.2 Kernels

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 10:15:00 PM
Up until today the newest Linux kernel version supported by the official Reiser4 out-of-tree file-system driver patch was Linux 5.0, but that has now changed with the belated Linux 5.1 kernel support arriving as well as a separate patch for Linux 5.2 kernel support...

Cooling The Raspberry Pi 4 With The Fan SHIM & FLIRC For Better Performance

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:30:00 PM
With the Raspberry Pi 4, a passive heatsink is an absolute minimum for running this new ARM SBC unless you want to deal with potentially drastic performance limitations based upon your operating conditions. However, if you will be enduring the Raspberry Pi 4 with significant load for any measurable length of time, an active cooler is almost warranted or otherwise a very capable passive cooler. In this article we're looking at the Raspberry Pi 4 performance with a Fan SHIM as an active fan designed for running on the Raspberry Pi off the GPIO pins as well as the FLIRC as a metal case that passively cools the device.

NVIDIA 435.17 Linux Beta Driver Adds Vulkan + OpenGL PRIME Render Offload

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 05:15:50 PM
NVIDIA this morning introduced their 435 Linux driver series currently in beta form with the release of the 435.17 Linux build. With this new driver comes finally the best PRIME/multi-GPU support they have presented to date...

Vulkan Video Decoding Coming In H1'2020, Ray-Tracing Progressing

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 05:00:01 PM
The Khronos Group has posted their material from the SIGGRAPH 2019 graphics conference and includes some interesting updates on Vulkan and their ongoing efforts...

NVIDIA Continues To Be Involved With Making Vulkan More Appropriate For Machine Learning

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 04:41:57 PM
NVIDIA engineers continue to be among those in the Vulkan technical sub-group working to advance machine learning for this API...

Fedora Developers Discuss Ways To Improve Linux Interactivity In Low-Memory Situations

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 01:25:29 PM
Similar to the recent upstream Linux kernel discussions over the poor Linux desktop experience when in memory pressure situations particularly with systems having limited amounts of RAM, Fedora developers are discussing ways to improve this experience as well...

Oracle's Kernel Test Framework Might Be Added To The Linux Kernel Tree

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 12:12:24 PM
Knut Omang of Oracle is working on integrating the Kernel Test Framework into the Linux kernel source tree/repository...

Mir 1.4 Released With Fix For GTK3, Support For Exclusive Zones

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 11:01:43 AM
The Canonical team led by Alan Griffiths for maintaining the Mir display server with Wayland support today rolled out Mir version 1.4...

Qt PDF Being Discussed For Qt 5.14

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 10:48:13 AM
Being evaluated for Qt 5.14 is shipping Qt PDF that allows PDF documents to be rendered/viewed inside QWidget-based applications...

Linux Finally Has A Fix For Crackling Audio Input On Recent AMD Systems

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 05:50:00 AM
Queued now for Linux 5.3 and also marked for back-porting to existing kernel stable series is a fix to address distorted and crackling analog audio input that has affected AMD systems for at least the past two years with certain Realtek audio codecs...

ROCK Pi 4 Is Becoming A Good Arm SBC With Panfrost Graphics & Wayland Support

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 04:02:17 AM
At $39 to $66 USD depending upon model, the ROCK Pi 4 is evolving to offer nice open-source support down to the Arm Mali graphics thanks to the Panfrost Mesa driver and also works nicely with Wayland...

Intel's Linux Graphics Driver Developers Discover 3~20% Boost For Current-Gen Hardware

Monday 12th of August 2019 10:48:04 PM
Last week was the Intel Gallium driver one line patch to boost performance by 1%. Today's code churn within Mesa for Intel's open-source Linux graphics drivers were larger but also with a more profound performance impact with some workloads now being faster by around 20%. Making this more exciting is that today's round of driver optimizations apply to the very common and mature "Gen 9" graphics hardware...

DragonFlyBSD 5.6.2 Released With Disruptive Change To Help Chromium, Ported Apps

Monday 12th of August 2019 09:47:35 PM
DragonFlyBSD 5.6.2 is out today as the newest version of this popular BSD operating system...

TGSI To NIR Improvements Hit Mesa 19.2 For RadeonSI

Monday 12th of August 2019 09:10:26 PM
AMD Mesa lead developer Marek Olšák has landed a set of improvements to the TGSI-to-NIR pass today for Mesa 19.2 to enhance the RadeonSI driver's support for using this intermediate representation...

AMD Ryzen 3000 Series Playing Nicely With Latest Linux Distros Following BIOS Updates

Monday 12th of August 2019 03:00:00 PM
One month ago we were told that AMD released a BIOS fix to their motherboard partners for addressing the systemd boot issue with Ryzen 3000 series processors that stems from an RdRand instruction issue. Finally over the past week we've seen motherboard vendors pushing out BIOS updates for the prominent motherboards and indeed this takes care of the issue...

Gentoo's 64-bit ARM Support Is Now In Good Shape With Profiles Deemed Stable

Monday 12th of August 2019 02:10:06 PM
Gentoo's AArch64/ARM64 support for 64-bit ARM should now be in good shape...

AMD EPYC Rome Still Conquering Cascadelake Even Without Mitigations

Monday 12th of August 2019 01:43:39 PM
With last week's dramatic EPYC "Rome" launch where AMD has blown past Intel Xeon "Cascadelake" performance in a majority of server benchmarks, helping the successful launch of these Zen 2 server processors has been Intel's repeated delays of 10nm/Icelake CPUs and also the Spectre / Meltdown / Zombieload / Foreshadow mitigations. Out of curiosity, I've run some unmitigated benchmarks for the various relevant CPU speculative execution vulnerabilities on both the Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 Cascadelake and AMD EPYC 7742 Rome processors for seeing how the performance differs.

Intel Tiger Lake Support Added To The LLVM Clang 10 Compiler

Monday 12th of August 2019 11:29:44 AM
We have seen Intel's compiler gurus contributing new enablement patches for Tiger Lake support with GCC 10 due out next year while now they have also landed their initial Tiger Lake support into the LLVM Clang 10 code compiler also due out in H1'2020...

Vulkan 1.1.119 Already Released With Another New Extension

Monday 12th of August 2019 11:10:47 AM
It was just yesterday that Vulkan 1.1.118 was released with two new extensions while now this Monday morning Vulkan 1.1.119 was released as a third extension was accidentally left out of yesterday's weekly revision...

Stepping Towards Better VR Headset Support On Wayland

Monday 12th of August 2019 10:58:31 AM
Sway and WLROOTS creator Drew DeVault on top of his several open-source projects has also been working on improving the VR infrastructure support on Wayland as part of contract work for Status.im. The secure communication company is looking to build a Wayland-driven VR workspace but for that the VR headset support on Wayland needs to be improved...

More in Tux Machines

Security: Open Source Security Podcast, Screwed Drivers, and Voting Machines

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 157 - Backdoors and snake oil in our cryptography

    Josh and Kurt talk about snakeoil cryptography at Black Hat and the new backdoored cryptography fight. Both of these problems will be with us for a very long time. These are fights worth fighting because it's the right thing to do.

  • Screwed Drivers – Signed, Sealed, Delivered

    Our analysis found that the problem of insecure drivers is widespread, affecting more than 40 drivers from at least 20 different vendors – including every major BIOS vendor, as well as hardware vendors like ASUS, Toshiba, NVIDIA, and Huawei. However, the widespread nature of these vulnerabilities highlights a more fundamental issue – all the vulnerable drivers we discovered have been certified by Microsoft. Since the presence of a vulnerable driver on a device can provide a user (or attacker) with improperly elevated privileges, we have engaged Microsoft to support solutions to better protect against this class of vulnerabilities, such as blacklisting known bad drivers.

  • Most states still aren’t set to audit paper ballots in 2020

    Despite some progress on voting security since 2016, most states in the US aren’t set to require an audit of paper ballots in the November 2020 election, according to a new report out this week from the Brennan Center for Justice.

    The report notes that experts and government officials have spent years recommending states adopt verifiable paper ballots for elections, but a handful still use electronic methods potentially vulnerable to cyberattacks. In 2016, 14 states used paperless machines, although the number today is 11, and the report estimates that no more than eight will use them in the 2020 election.

Linux Candy: WallGen – image generator tool

Who loves eye candy? Don’t be shy — you can raise both hands!! Linux Candy is a new series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We’re only going to feature open-source software in this series. I’m not going to harp on about the tired proverb “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy”. But there’s a certain element of truth here. If you spend all day coding neural networks, mastering a new programming language, sit in meetings feeling bored witless, you’ll need some relief at the end of the day. And what better way by making your desktop environment a bit more memorable. Let’s start our candy adventure with WallGen. It’s a small command-line utility that generates HQ poly wallpapers with only a few text arguments for inputs. Depending on these arguments, you can create shape-based patterns, randomly filled surfaces, and even image-based patterns. Read more

Richard Brown: Changing of the Guard

After six years on the openSUSE Board and five as its Chairperson, I have decided to step down as Chair of the openSUSE Board effective today, August 19. This has been a very difficult decision for me to make, with reasons that are diverse, interlinked, and personal. Some of the key factors that led me to make this step include the time required to do the job properly, and the length of time I’ve served. Five years is more than twice as long as any of my predecessors. The time required to do the role properly has increased and I now find it impossible to balance the demands of the role with the requirements of my primary role as a developer in SUSE, and with what I wish to achieve outside of work and community. As difficult as it is to step back from something I’ve enjoyed doing for so long, I am looking forward to achieving a better balance between work, community, and life in general. Serving as member and chair of the openSUSE Board has been an absolute pleasure and highly rewarding. Meeting and communicating with members of the project as well as championing the cause of openSUSE has been a joyous part of my life that I know I will miss going forward. openSUSE won’t get rid of me entirely. While I do intend to step back from any governance topics, I will still be working at SUSE in the Future Technology Team. Following SUSE’s Open Source policy, we do a lot in openSUSE. I am especially looking forward to being able to focus on Kubic & MicroOS much more than I have been lately. As I’m sure it’s likely to be a question, I wish to make it crystal clear that my decision has nothing to do with the Board’s ongoing efforts to form an independent openSUSE Foundation. The Board’s decision to form a Foundation had my complete backing as Chairperson, and will continue to have as a regular openSUSE contributor. I have absolute confidence in the openSUSE Board; Indeed, I don’t think I would be able to make this decision at this time if I wasn’t certain that I was leaving openSUSE in good hands. On that note, SUSE has appointed Gerald Pfeifer as my replacement as Chair. Gerald is SUSE’s EMEA-based CTO, with a long history as a Tumbleweed user, an active openSUSE Member, and upstream contributor/maintainer in projects like GCC and Wine. Read more

An introduction to bpftrace for Linux

Bpftrace is a new open source tracer for Linux for analyzing production performance problems and troubleshooting software. Its users and contributors include Netflix, Facebook, Red Hat, Shopify, and others, and it was created by Alastair Robertson, a talented UK-based developer who has won various coding competitions. Linux already has many performance tools, but they are often counter-based and have limited visibility. For example, iostat(1) or a monitoring agent may tell you your average disk latency, but not the distribution of this latency. Distributions can reveal multiple modes or outliers, either of which may be the real cause of your performance problems. Bpftrace is suited for this kind of analysis: decomposing metrics into distributions or per-event logs and creating new metrics for visibility into blind spots. Read more