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Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews
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Nemo 3.2.0 With Unity Patches And Without Cinnamon Dependencies Available In New PPA For Ubuntu 16.04 And 16.10

Tuesday 29th of November 2016 01:03:00 PM
Nemo 3.2.0 with Unity patches and without Cinnamon dependencies is available for Ubuntu 16.04 and 16.10. To make it easy to go back to Nemo 2.8.0 for Ubuntu 16.04 users in case something doesn't work properly (because there were quite a few under the hood changes in Nemo), I decided to upload the latest Nemo 3.2.0 to a new PPA.

For those not familiar with Nemo, this is the default Cinnamon file manager, forked from the old Nautilus 3.4. Nemo features include:
  • dual pane (can be enabled from the View menu or using the F3 key)
  • unified, configurable toolbar (you can show or hide the up, next, home, open in terminal, new folder, search button and more);
  • built-in actions, scripts and extensions manager;
  • treeview sidebar option;
  • re-worked statusbar with zoom controls, free space info, as well as options to toggle displaying the places sidebar, treeview or completely hide the sidebar;
  • the main toolbar, menubar, and statusbar can be hidden;
  • built-in "Open as root" and "Open in terminal" context menu items;
  • "Set as Wallpaper" context menu for images;
  • sidebar: indicators under each drive, displaying the free/used space;
  • improved the Open With dialog;
  • option to resize individual desktop icons;
  • much more.

Nemo 3.2.0 with two panes and plugin manager
Nemo has received quite a few improvements since version 2.8.x (which is available in the WebUpd8 Nemo PPA), such as:
  • option to choose on which monitor to show the desktop folder (icons). This can be changed via Dconf Editor (org > nemo > desktop > desktop-layout), and can be set to show desktop icons on primary monitor, on remaining monitors, or on all monitors (default is primary only).
  • fixed wrong desktop size with GTK 3.20;
  • re-enabled desktop type-to-select feature;
  • option to double-click empty area to go to parent directory (can be enabled in the Nemo Preferences, under Behavior);
  • only append .desktop to desktop files when they actually need it. Trusted desktop files (ones that typically get made and placed on the desktop) don't show their extension, so when you try to rename them, the new name needs .desktop appended to it;
  • many other improvements and bug fixes.

For a complete Nemo changelog, see THIS page.

This PPA provides Nemo without Cinnamon dependencies (well, one is needed for translations: cinnamon-l10n, and is provided by the PPA) and with Unity patches, such as Unity Launcher quicklists and progress bar support, GNOME / Unity Control Center support, patch to draw the desktop background (wallpaper), and various other minor tweaks / fixes for Unity.
While Nemo from this PPA is patched for Unity, it should work with other desktop environments as well, like GNOME (Shell) or Xfce, although I didn't test it.
Note that for Ubuntu 16.10, I disabled the "Recent" sidebar item, because it doesn't work. It does work, and is enabled by default, in Ubuntu 16.04. Update: It looks like a bug in the gvfs-daemon service is causing this. To get it to work, add "Environment=DISPLAY=:0" in /usr/lib/systemd/user/gvfs-daemon.service, then restart the system. To re-enable the "Recent" item in Nemo's sidebar, use Dconf Editor and enable org > nemo > privacy > remember-recent-files.



Install Nemo with Unity patches and without Cinnamon dependencies in Ubuntu 16.10 or 16.04
Important: do not use this PPA if you use Linux Mint or if you use the Cinnamon desktop in Ubuntu! Also, if you've added any Cinnamon PPAs, you'll have to purge them before using this Nemo PPA.
To add the Nemo 3 PPA (new PPA; the old WebUpd8 Nemo PPA still has Nemo 2.8.x!) and install Nemo with Unity patches and without Cinnamon dependencies, use the following commands:sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/nemo3
sudo apt update
sudo apt install nemo
To install Nemo extensions, you can either search for "nemo" in Synaptic, or install them via command line - you can find the available extensions HERE.
Optional: set Nemo as the default file manager
To set Nemo as the default file manager (including setting Nemo to manage the desktop), use the following commands:gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.background show-desktop-icons false
xdg-mime default nemo.desktop inode/directory application/x-gnome-saved-search(the first command above disables Nautilus from handling the desktop, and the second command sets Nemo as the default app to open directories)

Then restart the session (logout/login) and you're done!


How to revert the changes
To revert the changes, use Nautilus to draw the desktop instead of Nemo:
gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.background show-desktop-icons true
And set Nautilus back as the default file manager:
xdg-mime default nautilus.desktop inode/directory application/x-gnome-saved-search
To remove the PPA and all the Nemo packages (including the Nemo extensions), use:
sudo apt remove nemo nemo-*
sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/webupd8team-nemo-*.list

Vivaldi Browser Sees New Stable Release

Tuesday 22nd of November 2016 10:39:00 AM

Vivaldi, the browser aimed at power users, was updated to version 1.5 today, bringing support for bulk tab commands, smart-home lighting integration, and more.
As a reminder, Vivaldi browser is built using open source technologies, like the Blink engine, Node.js, and React.js, but is not open source software. It includes features such as tab stacks, Opera-like Speed dial which supports multiple folders, as well as built-in notes, and a tool called Quick Commands, that can be used to search through the Vivaldi history, open tabs, settings, bookmarks and more.
Vivaldi 1.5 reader view
Changes in Vivaldi 1.5 include:
  • Vivaldi now integrates with Hue color lights from Philips, which allows the browser to "synchronize your physical surroundings with the color of the web";
  • you can now apply bulk commands to tabs, including dragging them into stacks or to a new window (hold Ctrl to select multiple tabs);
  • the build-in notes can now automatically attach a screenshot of a web page;
  • a reader mode button is now available in the address bar, and a configurable keyboard shortcut for it was added;
  • built-in Chromecast support;
  • support for delta updates on Windows

For more information and a complete changelog, see THIS page.


Download Vivaldi
Download Vivaldi (available for Linux: 32bit and 64bit deb and rpm, Windows and Mac)

Recent Notifications Indicator Lets You Access Missed Desktop Notifications

Friday 18th of November 2016 12:36:00 PM
Recent Notifications is an Ubuntu Indicator that collects desktop notifications, displaying them in its menu. This is useful if you missed some important notification for various reasons, like being away from the computer, etc.

I've covered Recent Notifications before, however, the last article on WebUpd8 dates back to 2011, so I decided to post another article about it (and redirect the old ones to this one), especially since the indicator changed / improved since then.
Recent Notifications indicator collects notifications sent with libnotify to a notification daemon, such as NotifyOSD, and supports Unity, Xfce, MATE and GNOME Flashback session.
Features:
  • collect notifications and display the 5 (this is configurable) most recent notifications. Older notifications can be accessed by clearing some of the most recent notifications;
  • clear individual or all notifications;
  • option to ignore notifications by application name;
  • GTK3 version only: links in notifications are clickable;
  • keyboard support: you can dismiss notifications using your keyboard. Press space to dismiss the notification but leave the indicator open, or press enter to dismiss the notification and close the indicator menu.

The Recent Notifications indicator menu allows removing individual notifications or clearing all notifications, without any other options. However, the indicator does support some customization via Dconf Editor. If you don't have Dconf Editor, you can install it using the following command:sudo apt install dconf-editor
Using Dconf Editor, navigate to net > launchpad > indicator > notifications (or notifications-gtk2), and you'll find 3 configurable options for Recent Notifications: blacklist, hide-indicator, and max-items:

Note that if you had to install the GTK2 version (if you're using Ubuntu MATE older than 16.10), both "notifications" and "notifications-gtk2" will show up - you'll need to change the options for "notifications-gtk2".
The last two options are self-explanatory, so I'll only explain the blacklist option. This allows blacklisting applications so their notifications are not collected by Recent Notifications.
The blacklist feature can be used to filter out less important notifications, like those sent by a music player, or the Sound Indicator (which displays notifications when changing the volume, something that's not really useful to have in Recent Notifications).
For example to blacklist Sound Indicator notifications from showing up in Recent Notifications, set the "blacklist" value using Dconf Editor to:['indicator-sound']Blacklisting the Sound Indicator worked in my test under Unity, but it didn't under Xfce (Xubuntu).
For applications, simply enter the application name. Note that the app name is case sensitive. For instance, to blacklist Rhythmbox, use:['Rhythmbox']
To blacklist multiple items, separate them with a comma, then a space. For instance, to blacklist both the Sound Indicator and Rhythmbox, use:['indicator-sound', 'Rhythmbox']

Install Recent Notifications
For MATE and Xfce, the Indicator Applet / Indicator Plugin is required for this to work (it must be added to the panel). Also, for Ubuntu MATE versions older than 16.10, you'll need to install the GTK2 version of Recent Notifications.

To install Recent Notifications in Ubuntu, Xubuntu, or Ubuntu MATE, you can use its official PPA. To add the PPA and update the software sources, use the following commands:sudo add-apt-repository ppa:jconti/recent-notifications
sudo apt update
Then, to install the Recent Notifications GTK3 indicator, use the command below:sudo apt-get install indicator-notifications
If you use Ubuntu MATE older than 16.10, you'll need the GTK2 version, which you can install using the following command:sudo apt install indicator-notifications-gtk2
Once installed, restart the session (logout/login) and Recent Notifications should start automatically.
Report any bugs you may encounter @ Launchpad.

Bypass ISP Website Censorship With Alkasir 2.0

Thursday 17th of November 2016 04:26:00 PM
Alkasir is a free, open source website censorship circumvention tool, available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Android and iOS versions are "main objectives for 2016". For now it only works with Google Chrome.

Besides allowing users to access censored websites, the application also keeps you informed about URLs that are still blocked and those which have been unblocked.
Alkasir was launched in 2009 as a Windows-only closed source application however, with version 2.0, released in 2016, the application became free, open source software, and it gained support for Linux and Mac.
It's important to mention from the start that Alkasir was created to bypass restrictions imposed by ISPs, "to allow users to access information about their countries and regions that are concealed by the states mainly because of political reasons. An example would be news websites that cover protests, expose corruption, promote open online discussions and debates on political, social and cultural issues, etc.".
Its goal is not to unblock websites / services that exclude certain countries on purpose, like Pandora, Netflix, Spotify and so on, and it will not work with such websites. Its developers can't afford to support bandwidth-hungry websites and keep the service free.
Alkasir features:
  • to unblock restricted websites, Alkasir uses its own proxy servers (and the data is encrypted), which it activates only for blocked websites;
  • keeps you informed about which URLs are still blocked and which have been unblocked;
  • optimized for speed: since Alkasir does not support bandwidth-intensive websites, the strain on the proxy servers is reduced considerably, resulting in fast access to blocked websites;
  • it does not save IP addresses or any personal data that could directly identify a particular device or user on the Internet;
  • automatic updates.

Since the Alkasir website lacks some information that's provided in its web interface, here are some useful links from its GitHub page:
Note that while I like to test everything I post on WebUpd8, I couldn't test Alkasir because my ISP doesn't censor / block any websites.
I decided to write an article about Alkasir because Lantern, a somewhat similar tool which I covered on WebUpd8 a while back, which was initially free to use, requires a paid subscription for unlimited usage for some time.

Download and usage
Alkasir is available for Linux, Windows and Mac. The GUI (tray / AppIndicator) is available on Mac and Linux for 64bit only. For Linux 32bit (without a GUI) there are separate instructions for how to setup Alkasir.
Setting up Alkasir (with a GUI) is fairly easy. Download Alkasir (in case the website is blocked by your ISP, here's a direct link to its GitHub download page - you'll need the "-gui" binary), extract it and simply double click the "alkasir" executable to run it. You'll also need to install the Alkasir Chrome extension.
Next, from the Alkasir tray / AppIndicator menu, select "Open in browser". This will open the Alkasir web UI in your default browser. For the first step, you'll simply have to select the language and location.
In the next (and final) step, called "Browser integration", click the "Copy to clipboard" button:

... then right click the Alkasir Chrome extension icon, select "Options", and on the extension options page, paste the code copied in the step above:


That's it!

The language/location settings as well as the browser integration code can be accessed later, from the Alkasir settings, which can be accessed both via the Chrome extension or by selecting "Open in web browser" from the Alkasir tray / AppIndicator menu.

If you're running a 32bit Linux distribution, there's no GUI binary available, but you can use the Alkasir Client binary, which is available for 32bit.

To set up the Alkasir Client (without a GUI), firstly install the Chrome extension, then download the 32bit alkasir-client binary from GitHub, extract it and run it.
E.g. if you've extracted it in your home folder, open a terminal and run Alkasir by using the following command:~/alkasir-client-linux-386/alkasir-client_linux_386
Next, you'll need the Alkasir client authentication key. You can find this in the settings.json file from the ~/.alkasir folder. To open this file in Gedit so you can copy the key, simply use the following command:
gedit ~/.alkasir/settings.json
The code you're looking for should be on line 6 ("ClientAuthKey") - copy this code, then right click the Alkasir Chrome extension, select "Options" and under "browser code", paste this key and right after it, add "::8899" (without the quotes).
Now you should be able to complete the Alkasir setup process by clicking on the Chrome extension icon and following the instructions.

Get A Live Preview Of A Window From Another Workspace With WindowSpy (Unity)

Thursday 17th of November 2016 11:49:00 AM
WindowSpy is a new Unity AppIndicator that allows displaying a small live (well, almost) preview of a window on another workspace.

Created by Jacob Vlijm as a response to an AskUbuntu question, the tool is useful if you want to keep an eye on a window on another workspace, waiting for something to finish.
For example, you can use it to see the progress of something that's running in a virtual machine. WindowSpy is not exactly useful if you want to use it to watch a video in the preview, because the preview is updated every 3 seconds.

WindowSpy allows some preview window customization, like the size, border width, background color and window position. The interval between preview updates is not configurable, at least for now.
You may also want to check out Jacob's other projects: Take A Break, NoNotifications, SpaceView, Unity WallpaperSwitcher and Unity LauncherSwitcher.


Using WindowSpy
Using WindowSpy may be a bit confusing at first, so here's how it works. The first thing you'll need to do is focus the window that you want to keep an eye on in the preview, then select "Represent active window elsewhere" from the WindowSpy indicator menu.
Next, you can move to another viewport and from the WindowSpy indicator menu, select "Show preview on this viewport" to create the preview.
Once you do this, the window is minimized and set to sticky (is displayed on all workspaces). That's because for the preview to work, the window needs to be on the current workspace. This is undone automatically once you close the preview from the indicator menu.
The preview doesn't have any window borders so to move it, hold Alt and left-click, dragging the window to the desired position.
To close the preview window, simply select "Close preview and move to original viewport" from the WindowSpy indicator menu.
You can cycle through these 3 stages (represent window elsewhere, show preview and close preview) using a keyboard shortcut, which you must set manually. To do this, go to System Settings > Keyboard > Shortcuts, then under "Custom Shortcuts" click "+" to add a new shortcut, use "/opt/windowspy/code/cycle" (without the quotes) for the command and assign it any keyboard shorcut you want (make sure the keyboard shortcut is not already in use).

For more about how WindowSpy works, check out THIS AskUbuntu answer. 
I should also mention that in Ubuntu 16.10, getting a VirtualBox machine in a preview is a bit tricky. That's because at least on my computer, when a virtual machine is focused, indicators are not clickable (bug report). Furthermore, using the keyboard shortcut doesn't work directly because VirtualBox disables the host keyboard shortcuts when a virtual machine is focused.
WindowSpy has a built-in workaround for this - it automatically looks for VirtualBox virtual machine windows if the user clicks on the desktop and then uses the keyboard shortcut. But this didn't work for me in Ubuntu 16.10.
My workaround for this issue was to create a small script which adds a delay before running the "cycle" script, so I can use the keyboard shorcut, then activate the VirtualBox machine window. To do this, simply paste "sleep 2 && /opt/windowspy/code/cycle" (without the quotes; "2" is the number of seconds to delay running the cycle script) in a file, make it executable, and use that for the keyboard shortcut command instead of "/opt/windowspy/code/cycle" directly.


Install WindowSpy in Ubuntu
WindowSpy is available in a PPA for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 and 14.04. To add the PPA and install the application, use the following commands:sudo add-apt-repository ppa:vlijm/windowspy
sudo apt update
sudo apt install windowspyAlternatively, you can download the deb from HERE.

Report any bugs you may find @ Launchpad.

Thanks to Jacob for the tip!

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

  • Improving Storage Performance with Ceph and Flash
    Ceph is a storage system designed to be used at scale, with clusters of Ceph in deployment in excess of 40 petabytes today. At LinuxCon Europe, Allen Samuels, Engineering Fellow at Western Digital, says that Ceph has been proven to scale out reasonably well. Samuels says, “the most important thing that a storage management system does in the clustered world is to give you availability and durability,” and much of the technology in Ceph focuses on controlling the availability and the durability of your data. In his presentation, Samuels talks not just about some of the performance advantages to deploying Ceph on Flash, but he also goes into detail about what they are doing to optimize Ceph in future releases.
  • Ceph and Flash by Allen Samuels, Western Digital
  • Red Hat Opens Up OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    When businesses and enterprises begin adopting data center platforms that utilize containerization, then and only then can we finally say that the container trend is sweeping the planet. Red Hat’s starter option for containerization platforms is OpenShift Dedicated — a public cloud-based, mostly preconfigured solution, which launched at this time last year on Amazon AWS.
  • Volatility Numbers in View for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Rhizome is working on an open-source tool to help archive digital content
    "The stability of this kind of easy archiving for document storage, review and revision is a great possibility, but the workflow for journalists is very specific, so the grant will allow us to figure out how it could function." Another feature of Webrecorder that journalists might find appealing, and one of the software's core purposes, is to preserve material that might be deleted or become unavailable in time. However, the tool is currently operated under a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Takedown policy. This means any individual can ask for a record of their web presence or materials to be removed, so Rhizome will be working to "answer the more complicated questions and figure out policies" around privacy and copyright with the latest round of funding.
  • An ode to releasing software
    There is one particular moment in every Free and Open Source Software project: it’s the time when the software is about to get released. The software has been totally frozen of course, QA tests have been made, all the lights are green; the website still needs to be updated with the release notes, perhaps some new content and of course the stable builds have to be uploaded. The release time is always a special one. The very day of the release, there is some excitement and often a bit of stress. The release manager(s), as well as everyone working on the project’s infrastructure are busy making sure everything is ready when the upload of the stable version of the software, binaries and source, has been completed. In many cases, some attention is paid to the main project’s mirror servers so that the downloads are fluid and work (mostly) flawlessly as soon as the release has been pushed and published.
  • Diversity Scholarship Series: My Time at CloudNativeCon 2016
    CloudNativeCon 2016 was a wonderful first conference for me and although the whirlwind of a conference is tiring, I left feeling motivated and inspired. The conference made me feel like I was a part of the community and technology I have been working with daily.
  • WordPress 4.7 Content Management System Provides New Design Options
    WordPress is among the most widely used open-source technologies in the world, powering more than 70 million websites. WordPress 4.7 was released Dec. 6, providing a new milestone update including new features for both users and developers. As is typically the case with new WordPress releases, there is also a new default theme in the 4.7 update. The 2017 theme provides users with a number of interesting attributes including the large feature image as well as the ability to have a video as part of the header image. The Theme Customizer feature enables users to more intuitively adjust various elements of a theme, to fit the needs of websites that use will upgrade to WordPress 4.7. In addition, the new custom CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) feature within a theme preview lets users quickly see how style changes will change the look of a site. As an open-source project, WordPress benefits from participation of independent contributors and for the 4.7 release there were 482 contributors. In this slideshow eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the WordPress 4.7 release.
  • Psychology Professor Releases Free, Open-Source, Preprint Software
    The Center for Open Science, directed by University of Virginia psychology professor Brian Nosek, has launched three new services to more quickly share research data as the center continues its mission to press for openness, integrity and reproducibility of scientific research. Typically, researchers send preprint manuscripts detailing their research findings to peer-reviewed academic journals, such as Nature and Science. The review process can take months or even years before publication – if the research is published at all. By contrast, “preprinting,” or sharing non-peer-reviewed research results online, enables crucial data to get out to the community the moment it is completed. That, said Nosek, is critical.
  • Integral Ad Science Launches Open Source SDK to Drive Mobile Innovation for the Advertising Industry
  • Tullett Prebon Information, Quaternion and Columbia University form open source risk collaboration
  • Tullett Prebon Information And Quaternion Risk Management Partner To Enhance Transparency And Standardisation In Risk Modelling – Partnership Fuels Columbia University Research To Improve Understanding Of Systemic Risk
  • Integral Ad Science Partners with Google, Others for Open Source Viewability
  • DoomRL creator makes free roguelike open-source to try and counter Zenimax legal threat
  • DoomRL Goes Open-Source in Face of Copyright Claims
    Earlier this week, ZeniMax Medi hit DoomRL, a popular roguelike version of the original first-person shooter, with a cease-and-desist order. This order instructed producer ChaosForge to remove the free downloadable game to prevent further legal action. Instead of taking it down, co-creator Kornel Kisielewicz turned the game open-source.
  • This Indian software company just partnered with the world’s biggest open source community
    In what can be called a major motivation for Indian tech firms, Amrut Software, an end-to-end Software, BPO services and solutions provider has become a GitHub distributor for India region. GitHub hosts world’s biggest open source community along with the most popular version control systems, configuration management and collaboration tools for software developers. It has some of the largest installations of repositories in the world.
  • Python 3.6 released with many new improvements and features
    Python,the high-level interpreted programming language is now one of the most preferred programming language by beginners and professional-level developers.So,here Python 3.6 is now available with many changes,improvements and of course the ease of Python was not left in the work list.

Security Leftovers