Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OMG! Ubuntu!

Syndicate content OMG! Ubuntu!
An online Ubuntu magazine bringing you the latest Ubuntu news, apps, interview and reviews. Daily.
Updated: 6 hours 51 min ago

Okay Dash to Panel, That Does Look Super Slick…

Thursday 6th of June 2019 04:04:27 PM

I haven’t used a Windows desktop “properly” for around 8 years or so (and can’t say I miss it, either). Back when I first started this blog I had a multi-boot set up on my […]

This post, Okay Dash to Panel, That Does Look Super Slick…, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Zorin OS 15 Released, Based on Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS

Wednesday 5th of June 2019 05:01:24 PM

Zorin OS 15 is now available to download, based on Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS. In this you'll learn more about Zorin OS 15's new features and improvements.

This post, Zorin OS 15 Released, Based on Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Google Chrome 75 Released with Minor Improvements & Security Fixes

Wednesday 5th of June 2019 01:42:16 PM

Google Chrome 75 is the latest stable release of Google's popular web browser, but it's pretty low on any major user-facing changes or features.

This post, Google Chrome 75 Released with Minor Improvements & Security Fixes, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

LibreOffice 6.3 Drops 32-bit Linux Builds

Tuesday 4th of June 2019 04:08:10 PM

The LibreOffice 6.3 beta is out, but it brings some bad news for 32-bit Linux desktop users. The free office suite is dropping 32-bit support for Linux.

This post, LibreOffice 6.3 Drops 32-bit Linux Builds, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

How to Play Tetris in the Linux Terminal

Tuesday 4th of June 2019 01:06:56 PM

Tetris turns 35 on June 6, so to mark the occasion we show you how to play Tetris in the terminal on Linux desktops like Ubuntu. It's quick, easy and fun!

This post, How to Play Tetris in the Linux Terminal, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Wine 4.0 Backported to Linux Mint 19, Here’s How to Install It

Monday 3rd of June 2019 01:16:13 PM

It just got easier to install Wine 4.0 on Linux Mint 19 thanks to a backport by Linux Mint developers and a new meta package to streamline install.

This post, Wine 4.0 Backported to Linux Mint 19, Here’s How to Install It, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

KDE Plasma 5.16 Unveils Its ‘Cool’ New Wallpaper

Sunday 2nd of June 2019 12:57:45 PM

KDE Plasma 5.16 will include this ice cool new desktop wallpaper by default. The background was selected by way of a KDE community wallpaper competition.

This post, KDE Plasma 5.16 Unveils Its ‘Cool’ New Wallpaper, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Authenticator, a 2FA Token Generator for Linux, Gets Updated

Friday 31st of May 2019 02:21:09 PM

The Authenticator GTK app lets you generate 2FA tokens for over 500 well-known services, straight from the Linux desktop. We look at the new release.

This post, Authenticator, a 2FA Token Generator for Linux, Gets Updated, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Foliate is an Epic eBook Reader App for Linux Desktops

Thursday 30th of May 2019 10:03:58 PM

Foliate is a new GTK eBook reader app for Linux desktops. Foliate supports .epub files and has a range of font, layout and other customization options.

This post, Foliate is an Epic eBook Reader App for Linux Desktops, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

After 14 Years, Open Source Partition Editor GParted Finally Hits v1.0

Thursday 30th of May 2019 01:53:06 PM

Open-source GUI partition editor GParted has finally reached the version 1.0 milestone, after more than 14 years of 0.x numbered releases.

This post, After 14 Years, Open Source Partition Editor GParted Finally Hits v1.0, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Snapception: The Snap Store is Now Available as a Snap App

Wednesday 29th of May 2019 04:52:53 PM

Canonical's Snap store is now available to install as a Snap app on Snap-supported Linux distributions, including Ubuntu. Learn more about it here.

This post, Snapception: The Snap Store is Now Available as a Snap App, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Krita 4.2 Debuts with 1000+ Bug Fixes, New Features

Tuesday 28th of May 2019 03:08:53 PM

Krita 4.2.0 is the latest version of the powerful open-source graphics app written in Qt. We recap its new features and show you where to download it.

This post, Krita 4.2 Debuts with 1000+ Bug Fixes, New Features, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

More in Tux Machines

[CentOS-announce] Release for CentOS Linux 7 (1908) on the x86_64 Architecture

Release for CentOS Linux 7 (1908) on the x86_64 Architecture We are pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 7 (1908) for the x86_64 architecture. Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux 7 and is tagged as 1908, derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 Source Code. As always, read through the Release Notes at : http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS7 - these notes contain important information about the release and details about some of the content inside the release from the CentOS QA team. These notes are updated constantly to include issues and incorporate feedback from the users. Read more Also: CentOS 7.7 Released As The Last Stop Before CentOS 8.0

The 32-Bit Packages That Will Continue To Be Supported Through Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Earlier this year Canonical announced they would be pulling 32-bit support from Ubuntu ahead of next year's 20.04 LTS. But following public backlash, they stepped back to provide 32-bit support for select packages. Today they announced the 199 32-bit packages that will continue to be supported through Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Based upon popularity when looking at i386 packages that are not x86_64 (AMD64) packaged as well as feedback from their customers/partners, they have come up with a list of the 32-bit packages they will continue to support. Their list is 52 packages but with dependencies comes out to about 199 packages in the i386 realm they will continue to support. Read more Also: Ubuntu Devs Detail Plan for 32-bit Support in Ubuntu 19.10

AMD EPYC 7302 / 7402 / 7502 / 7742 Linux Performance Benchmarks

Last month we provided launch-day benchmarks of the AMD EPYC 7502 and 7742 under Linux in both 1P and 2P configurations for these exciting "Rome" Zen 2 server processors. For your viewing pleasure today is a fresh look at not only the EPYC 7502 and 7742 processors under the latest Linux 5.3 kernel but we've also expanded it to looking at the EPYC 7302 and EPYC 7402 processors as well with those processors recently being sent over by AMD. Under Ubuntu 19.04 with Linux 5.3, these four different AMD EPYC 7002 series SKUs were benchmarked along with some of the older AMD Naples processors and Intel Xeon Gold/Platinum processors for a fresh look at the Linux server performance. Read more

Mozilla: Media and Truth, Security and More

  • Examining AI’s Effect on Media and Truth

    Today, one of the biggest issues facing the internet — and society — is misinformation. It’s a complicated issue, but this much is certain: The artificial intelligence (AI) powering the internet is complicit. Platforms like YouTube and Facebook recommend and amplify content that will keep us clicking, even if it’s radical or flat out wrong. Earlier this year, Mozilla called for art and advocacy projects that illuminate the role AI plays in spreading misinformation. And today, we’re announcing the winners: Eight projects that highlight how AI like machine learning impacts our understanding of the truth.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Governments should work to strengthen online security, not undermine it

    On Friday, Mozilla filed comments in a case brought by Privacy International in the European Court of Human Rights involving government “computer network exploitation” (“CNE”)—or, as it is more colloquially known, government hacking. While the case focuses on the direct privacy and freedom of expression implications of UK government hacking, Mozilla intervened in order to showcase the further, downstream risks to users and internet security inherent in state CNE. Our submission highlights the security and related privacy threats from government stockpiling and use of technology vulnerabilities and exploits. Government CNE relies on the secret discovery or introduction of vulnerabilities—i.e., bugs in software, computers, networks, or other systems that create security weaknesses. “Exploits” are then built on top of the vulnerabilities. These exploits are essentially tools that take advantage of vulnerabilities in order to overcome the security of the software, hardware, or system for purposes of information gathering or disruption. When such vulnerabilities are kept secret, they can’t be patched by companies, and the products containing the vulnerabilities continue to be distributed, leaving people at risk. The problem arises because no one—including government—can perfectly secure information about a vulnerability. Vulnerabilities can be and are independently discovered by third parties and inadvertently leaked or stolen from government.

  • Time for some project updates

    I’m going to begin with some of the less-loved things I’ve been working on, partially in an attempt to motivate some forward-motion on things that I believe are rather important to Mozilla.