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Updated: 5 hours 35 min ago

Open Source API Gateway KrakenD Becomes Linux Foundation Project

Tuesday 11th of May 2021 10:00:00 PM

KrakenD framework becomes the Lura Project and gets home at Linux Foundation where it will be the only enterprise-grade API Gateway hosted in a neutral, open forum

SAN FRANCISCO, May 11, 2021 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it is hosting the Lura Project, formerly the KrakenD open source project. Lura is a framework for building Application Programming Interfaces (API) Gateways that goes beyond simple reverse proxy, functioning as an aggregator for many microservices and is a declarative tool for creating endpoints. 

Partners include 99P Labs (backed by Ohio State University), Ardan Studios, Hepsiburada, Openroom, Postman, Skalena and Stayforlong. 

“By being hosted at the Linux Foundation, the Lura Project will extend the legacy of the KrakenD open source framework and be better poised to support its massive adoption among more than one million servers every month,” said Albert Lombarte, CEO, KrakenD. “The Foundation’s open governance model will accelerate development and community support for this amazing success.”

API Gateways have become even more valuable as the necessary fabric for connecting cloud applications and services in hybrid environments. KrakenD was created five years ago as a library for engineers to create fast and reliable API Gateways. It has been in production among some of the world’s largest Internet businesses since 2016 As the Lura Project, it is a stateless, distributed, high-performance API Gateway that enables microservices adoption. 

“The Lura Project is an essential connection tissue for applications and services across open source cloud projects and so it’s a natural decision to host it at the Linux Foundation,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and general manager of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We’re looking forward to providing the open governance structure to support Lura Project’s massive growth.” 

For more information about the Lura Project, please visit: https://www.luraproject.org

Supporting Comments

Ardan Studios

“I’m excited to hear that KrakenD API Gateway is being brought into the family of open source projects managed by the Linux Foundation. I believe this shows the global community the commitment KrakenD has to keeping their technology open source and free to use. With the adoption that already exists, and this new promise towards the future, I expect amazing things for the product and the community around it,” said William Kennedy, Managing Partner at Ardan Studios.

Hepsiburada

“At Hepsiburada we have a massive amount of traffic and a complex ecosystem of around 500 microservices and different datacenters. Adding KrakenD to our Kubernetes clusters has helped us reduce the technical and organizational challenges of dealing with a vast amount of resources securely and easily. We have over 800 containers running with KrakenD and looking forward to having more,” said Alper Hankendi, Engineering Director Hepsiburada.

Openroom

“KrakenD allowed us to focus on our backend and deploy a secure and performant system in a few days. After more than 2 years of use in production and 0 crash or malfunction, it also has proven its robustness,” said Jonathan Muller, CTO Openroom Inc.

Postman

“KrakenD represents a renaissance of innovation and investment in the API gateway and management space by challenging the established players with a more lightweight, high performance, and modern gateway for API publisher to put to work across their API operations, while also continuing to establish the LInux Foundation as the home for open API specifications and tooling that are continuing to touch and shape almost every business sector today,” said Kin Lane, chief evangelist, Postman.

Stayforlong

“KrakenD makes it easier for us to manage authentication, filter bots, and integrate our apps. It has proved to be stable and reliable since day one. It is wonderful!” said Raúl M. Sillero, CTO Stayforlong.com.

Skalena

“The Opensource model always was a great proof of innovation and nowadays a synonym of high-quality products and incredible attention with the real needs from the market (Customer Experience). The Linux Foundation is one of the catalysts of incredible solutions, and KrakenD and now Lura would not have a better place to be. With this move, I am sure that it is a start of a new era for this incredible solution in the API Gateway space,  the market will be astonished by a lot of good things about to come,” said Edgar Silva, founder and partner at Skalena. 

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. The Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Jennifer Cloer
for the Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

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Save up to 50% on Cloud Training Bundles and Bootcamps!

Tuesday 11th of May 2021 09:00:04 PM

We probably don’t need to tell you how in demand cloud skills are right now, and how big of a shortage there is of qualified professionals. Just read these articles from TechHQ, CRN, TechRepublic, or our own 2020 Open Source Jobs Report which found hiring managers are more influenced by knowledge of cloud technologies than any other skill. If you are looking for a career change or to advance in your current IT career, cloud is the best place to start, and now is the time.

To make it easier to get started, Linux Foundation Training & Certification is offering 40% off our cloud training plus certification bundles, and 50% off our cloud engineer bootcamps through May 18! These offerings provide the knowledge you need to be successful in an entry-level cloud position, and the industry-leading certifications to prove it. 

Bundles, which include a training course and certification exam, are discounted by 40%:

Kubernetes Fundamentals (LFS258) + CKA Exam Bundle

This course will teach you how to use the container management platform used by companies like Google to manage their application infrastructure. It prepares you for the CKA exam, which demonstrates the ability to install, configure and manage production-grade Kubernetes clusters, in addition to your understanding of key concepts such as Kubernetes networking, storage, security, maintenance, logging and monitoring, application lifecycle, troubleshooting, API object primitives and the ability to establish basic use-cases for end users.

Kubernetes for Developers (LFD259) + CKAD Exam Bundle

This course will teach you how to containerize, host, deploy, and configure an application in a multi-node cluster. It prepares you for the CKAD exam, which demonstrates the ability to design, build, configure and expose cloud native applications for Kubernetes, define application resources and use core primitives to build, monitor, and troubleshoot scalable applications and tools in Kubernetes.

Kubernetes Security Essentials (LFS260) + CKS Exam Bundle

This course exposes you to knowledge and skills needed to maintain security in dynamic, multi-project environments. It prepares you for the CKS exam, which demonstrates the requisite abilities to secure container-based applications and Kubernetes platforms during build, deployment and runtime, and is qualified to perform these tasks in a professional setting.

The above bundles are reduced from $499 to $299 with coupon code CLOUD21.

Bootcamps, which are self-paced programs presented in a structured format with a dedicated mentor and access to live online video office hours with instructors, are discounted 50%:

Cloud Engineer Bootcamp

This program will prepare an absolute beginner to learn the most in-demand cloud computing skills in as little as 6 months. Components of the bootcamp include:

Essentials of Linux System Administration (LFS201) – This course will teach you how to administer, configure and upgrade Linux systems, which serve as the foundation of modern cloud infrastructures.
Linux Networking and Administration (LFS211) – Learn how to design, deploy and maintain a network running under Linux, administer network services and securely configure the network interfaces.
Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator Exam (LFCS) – Take some time to study and redo labs from the previous courses to improve your speed before taking your first certification exam. The performance-based LFCS certification will demonstrate your Linux skills to future employers.
Containers Fundamentals (LFS253) – In our app-driven world, containers and microservices are the perfect home for an application. Containers bundle an application with all its dependencies and deploy it on the platform of our choice. This course will help you build a solid foundation on container technologies.
DevOps and SRE Fundamentals (LFS261) – The DevOps movement is changing the way applications are built, tested, and deployed. This course will teach you the skills to deploy software with confidence, agility and high reliability using modern practices such as Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery, which are essential to modern cloud administration.
Kubernetes Fundamentals (LFS258) – This course will teach you how to use Kubernetes, the container management platform used by companies like Google to manage their application infrastructure. This includes learning how to install and configure a production-grade Kubernetes cluster, from network configuration to upgrades to making deployments available via services.
Certified Kubernetes Administrator Exam (CKA) – Revisit the labs from LFS253 and LFS258 before sitting for your final exam of the bootcamp. Earning your CKA will demonstrate you have the skills, knowledge, and competency to perform the responsibilities of a Kubernetes administrator and cloud engineer.

Advanced Cloud Engineer Bootcamp

This program is designed for existing IT professionals who want to transition into a cloud administrator or engineer role. It assumes you already have basic knowledge of Linux, networking and related technologies. Components of this bootcamp include:

Containers Fundamentals (LFS253) – In our app-driven world, containers and microservices are the perfect home for an application. This course will help you build a solid foundation for container technologies.
Kubernetes Fundamentals (LFS258) – This course will teach you how to install and configure a production-grade Kubernetes cluster, from network configuration to upgrades to making deployments available via services.
Certified Kubernetes Administrator Exam (CKA) – Earning your CKA will demonstrate you have the skills, knowledge, and competency to perform the responsibilities of a Kubernetes administrator and cloud engineer.
Service Mesh Fundamentals (LFS243) – With the growth of microservices and Kubernetes, production environments need to have tools to monitor and manage network traffic. This course explores the use of Envoy Proxy and Istio to take control of network access.
Monitoring Systems and Services with Prometheus (LFS241) – Prometheus is a monitoring system and time series database that is especially well suited for monitoring dynamic cloud environments. This course walks through installation and deployment, many of its major features, best practices, and use cases.
Cloud Native Logging with Fluentd (LFS242) – Known as the “unified logging layer”, Fluentd provides fast and efficient log transformation and enrichment, as well as aggregation and forwarding. This course is designed to introduce you to a technical background to the Fluentd log forwarding and aggregation tool for use in Cloud Native Logging.
Managing Kubernetes Applications with Helm (LFS244) – Deploying complex and interrelated microservices can be challenging. The course explains how to use Helm to package, install, and verify Kubernetes components in a production cluster.

The following benefits are included with both Bootcamps:

Daily, Live Instructor Office Hours
Access to a Dedicated Mentor
Dedicated Discussion Forum
And More…

 Bootcamps are regularly $999 but currently discounted to $499 with coupon code BOOTCAMP21.

Keep in mind that standard pricing on both the bundles and bootcamps will be increasing on July 1, so by enrolling now you’re saving even more.

Visit the promotion page for more information and to start your journey to a new cloud career!

The post Save up to 50% on Cloud Training Bundles and Bootcamps! appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

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The Linux Foundation and NGMN Collaborate on End-to-End 5G and Beyond

Monday 10th of May 2021 11:00:00 PM

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.  and FRANKFURT, GERMANY – May 10, 2021 – The Linux Foundation and the Next Generation Mobile Network Alliance (NGMN), today announce the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for formal collaboration regarding end-to-end 5G and beyond. 

NGMN’s mission is to provide impactful industry guidance to achieve innovative and affordable mobile telecommunication services for the end user, placing a particular focus on Mastering the Route to Disaggregation, Sustainability and Green Future Networks, as well as on 6G and the continuous support of 5G’s full implementation.

Creating and providing open, scalable building blocks for operators and service providers is critical to the industry adoption of 5G and beyond. Therefore, the collaboration between NGMN and the Linux Foundation will focus on end-to-end 5G architecture and beyond 5G. Specific areas of alignment may include sustainability, network automation and network autonomy based on Artificial Intelligence, security, edge cloud, virtualization, disaggregation, cloud native, and service-based architecture, to name a few. 

“We very much look forward to a mutually inspiring and beneficial collaboration with The Linux Foundation. Open Source is gaining increasing relevance for the strategic topics of our Work Programmes such as Mastering the Route to Disaggregation, Green Future Networks and 6G. We are delighted to partner with The Linux Foundation to jointly drive our mission for the benefit of the global ecosystem”, said Anita Doehler, CEO, NGMN Alliance.

“We are thrilled to be aligning with such an innovative, industry-leading organization,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge and IoT, the Linux Foundation. “Integrating NGMN’s expertise across pivotal areas like Disaggregation, Green Future Networks, cloud native, automation, and early work on 6G into LF Networking’s 5G Super Blueprint initiative is a natural next step for the industry.”

The Linux Foundation’s vision of harmonizing open source software with open standards has been in effect for several years, including collaborations with ETSI, TMF, MEF, GSMA, the O-RAN Alliance, and more. NGMN also maintains longstanding co-operations with all of these organisations. The alignment between The Linux Foundation and NGMN represents the latest in a long-standing effort to integrate open source and open standards across the industry. 

About NGMN

About NGMN Alliance (www.ngmn.org)

The NGMN Alliance (Next Generation Mobile Networks Alliance) is a forum founded by world-leading Mobile Network Operators and open to all partners in the mobile industry. Its goal is to ensure that next generation network infrastructure, service platforms and devices will meet the requirements of operators and, ultimately, will satisfy end user demand and expectations. The vision of the NGMN Alliance is to provide impactful industry guidance to achieve innovative and affordable mobile telecommunication services for the end user with a particular focus on supporting 5G’s full implementation, Mastering the Route to Disaggregation, Sustainability and Green Networks, and work on 6G.

NGMN seeks to incorporate the views of all interested stakeholders in the telecommunications industry and is open to three categories of participants (NGMN Partners): Mobile Network Operators (Members), vendors, software companies and other industry players (Contributors), as well as research institutes (Advisors).

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

The post The Linux Foundation and NGMN Collaborate on End-to-End 5G and Beyond appeared first on Linux Foundation.

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Btrfs: Advantages of upgrading from UEK5 to UEK6

Monday 10th of May 2021 10:00:00 PM

Advantages in btrfs you will receive when you upgrade from UEK5 to UEK6
Click to Read More at Oracle Linux Kernel Development

The post Btrfs: Advantages of upgrading from UEK5 to UEK6 appeared first on Linux.com.

OpenPOWER Foundation announces LibreBMC, a POWER-based, fully open-source BMC

Monday 10th of May 2021 05:56:02 PM

News from the OpenPOWER Blog:

Baseboard management controllers (BMCs) are a mainstay in data centers. They enable remote monitoring and access to servers, and they’re responsible for the rise of “lights out management.” But from a hardware perspective, there has been little innovation in this space for years. BMC processors are built on legacy architectures that are proprietary and closed.

The OpenPOWER Foundation is announcing a new workgroup to develop LibreBMC, the first ever baseboard management controller with completely open-source software and hardware. The processor will be based on the POWER ISA, which was open-sourced by IBM at OpenPOWER Summit North America in August, 2019.

Read more at OpenPOWER

The post OpenPOWER Foundation announces LibreBMC, a POWER-based, fully open-source BMC appeared first on Linux.com.

Interview with Masato Endo, OpenChain Project Japan

Monday 10th of May 2021 07:37:06 AM

Linux Foundation Editorial Director Jason Perlow had a chance to speak with Masato Endo, OpenChain Project Automotive Chair and Leader of the OpenChain Project Japan Work Group Promotion Sub Group, about the Japan Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry’s (METI) recent study on open source software management.

JP: Greetings, Endo-san! It is my pleasure to speak with you today. Can you tell me a bit about yourself and how you got involved with the Japan Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry?

遠藤さん、こんにちは!本日はお話しできることをうれしく思います。あなた自身について、また経済産業省とどのように関わっていますか。

ME: Hi, Jason-san! Thank you for such a precious opportunity. I’m a manager and scrum master in the planning and development department of new services at a Japanese automotive company. We were also working on building the OSS governance structure of the company, including obtaining OpenChain certification.

As an open source community member, I participated in the OpenChain project and was involved in establishing the OpenChain Japan Working Group and Automotive Working Group. Recently, as a leader of the Promotion SG of the Japan Working Group, I am focusing on promoting OSS license compliance in Japan.

In this project, I contribute to it as a bridge between the Ministry of Economic, Trade, and Industry and the members of OSS community projects such as OpenChain.

For example, I recently gave a presentation of OpenChain at the meeting and introduced the companies that cooperate with the case study.

Jasonさん、こんにちは。このような貴重な機会をありがとうございます。

私は、自動車メーカーの新サービスの企画・開発部署でマネージャーやスクラムマスターを務めています。また、OpenChain認証取得等の会社のオープンソースガバナンス体制構築についても取り組んでいました。

一方、コミュニティメンバーとしてもOpenChainプロジェクトに参加し、OpenChain Japan WGやAutomotive WGの設立に関わりました。最近では、Japan WGのPromotion SGのリーダーとして日本におけるOSSライセンスコンプライアンスの啓発活動に注力しています。

今回のプロジェクトにおいては、経済産業省のタスクフォースとOpenChainとの懸け橋として、ミーティングにてOpenChainの活動を紹介させて頂いたり、ケーススタディへの協力企業を紹介させて頂いたりすることで、コントリビューションさせて頂きました。

JP: What does the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) do?

経済産業省(METI)はどのような役割の役所ですか?

ME: METI has jurisdiction over the administration of the Japanese economy and industry. This case study was conducted by a task force that examines software management methods for ensuring cyber-physical security of the Commerce and Information Policy Bureau’s Cyber Security Division.

経済産業省は経済や産業に関する行政を所管しています。今回のケーススタディは商務情報政策局サイバーセキュリティ課によるサイバー・フィジカル・セキュリティ確保に向けたソフトウェア管理手法等検討タスクフォースにより実施されたものです。

JP: Why did METI commission a study on the management of open source program offices and open source software management at Japanese companies?

なぜ経済産業省は、日本企業のオープンソースプログラムオフィスの管理とオープンソースソフトウェアの管理に関する調査を実施したのですか?

ME: METI itself conducted this survey. The Task Force has been considering appropriate software management methods, vulnerability countermeasures, license countermeasures, and so on.

Meanwhile, as the importance of OSS utilization has increased in recent years, it concluded that sharing the knowledge of each company regarding OSS management methods helps solve each company’s problems.

今回の調査は、METIが主体的に行ったものです。タスクフォースは適切なソフトウェアの管理手法、脆弱性対応やライセンス対応などについて検討してきました。

そんな中、昨今のOSS利活用の重要性が高まる中、OSSの管理手法に関する各企業の知見の共有が各社の課題解決に有効だという結論に至りました。

JP: How do Japanese corporations differ from western counterparts in open source culture?

日本の企業は、オープンソース文化において欧米の企業とどのように違いますか?

ME: Like Western companies, Japanese companies also use OSS in various technical fields, and OSS has become indispensable. In addition, more than 80 companies have participated in the Japan Working Group of the OpenChain project. As a result, the momentum to promote the utilization of OSS is increasing in Japan.

On the other hand, some survey results show that Japanese companies’ contribution process and support system are delayed compared to Western companies. So, it is necessary to promote community activities in Japan.

欧米の企業と同様、日本の企業でもOSSは様々な技術領域で使われており、欠かせないものになっています。また、OpenChainプロジェクトのJPWGに80社以上の企業が参加するなど、企業としてOSSの利活用を推進する機運も高まってきています。

一方で、欧米企業と比較するとコントリビューションのプロセスやサポート体制の整備が遅れているという調査結果も出ているため、コミュニティ活動を促進する仕組みをより強化していく必要があると考えられます。

JP: What are the challenges that the open source community and METI have identified due to the study that Japanese companies face when adopting open source software within their organizations?

日本企業が組織内でオープンソースソフトウェアを採用する際に直面する調査の結果、オープンソースコミュニティと経済産業省が特定した課題は何ですか?

ME: In this case study, many companies mentioned license compliance. It was found that each company has established a company-wide system and rules to comply with the license and provides education to engineers. The best way to do this depends on the industry and size of the company, but I believe the information from this case study is very useful for each company of all over the world.

In addition, it was confirmed that Software Bill of Materials (SBOM) is becoming more critical for companies in the viewpoint of both vulnerability response and license compliance. Regardless of whether companies are using OSS internally or exchanging software with an external partner, it’s important to clarify which OSS they are using. I recognize that this issue is a hot topic as “Software transparency” in Western companies as well.

In this case study, several companies also mentioned OSS supply chain management. In addition to clarifying the rules between companies, it is characterized by working to raise the level of the entire supply chain through community activities such as OpenChain.

今回のケーススタディでは、多くの企業がライセンスコンプライアンスに言及していました。各企業はライセンスを遵守するために、全社的な体制やルールを整え、エンジニアに対してライセンス教育を実施していることがわかりました。ベストな方法は産業や企業の規模によっても異なりますが、各社の情報はこれからライセンスコンプライアンスに取り組もうとしている企業やプロセスの改善を進めている企業にとって非常に有益なものであると私は考えます。

また、脆弱性への対応、ライセンスコンプライアンスの両面から、企業にとってSBOMの重要性が高まっていることが確認できました。社内でOSSを利用する場合であっても、社外のパートナーとソフトウエアをやりとりする場合であっても、どのOSSを利用しているかを明確にすることが最重要だからです。この課題はソフトウエアの透過性といって欧米でも話題になっているものであると私は認識しています。

このケーススタディの中で複数の企業がOSSのサプライチェーンマネジメントについても言及していました。企業間でのルールを明確化する他、OpenChainなどのコミュニティ活動によって、サプライチェーン全体のレベルアップに取り組むことが特徴になっています。

Challenge 1: License compliance

When developing software using OSS, it is necessary to comply with the license declared by each OSS. If companies don’t conduct in-house licensing education and management appropriately, OSS license violations will occur.

Challenge 2: Long term support

Since the development term of OSS depends on the community’s activities, the support term may be shorter than the product life cycle in some cases.

Challenge 3:OSS supply chain management

Recently, the software supply chain scale has expanded, and there are frequent cases where OSS is included in deliveries from suppliers. OSS information sharing in the supply chain has become important to implement appropriate vulnerability countermeasures and license countermeasures.

Challenge 1: ライセンスコンプライアンス

OSSを利用してソフトウエアを開発する場合は、各OSSが宣言しているライセンスを遵守する必要があります。社内におけるライセンスに関する教育や管理体制が不十分な場合、OSSライセンスに違反してしまう可能性があります。

Challenge 2: ロングタームサポート

OSSの開発期間はコミュニティの活性度に依存するため、場合によっては製品のライフサイクルよりもサポート期間が短くなってしまう可能性があります。

Challenge 3: サプライチェーンにおけるOSSの使用

最近はソフトウエアサプライチェーンの規模が拡大しており、サプライヤからの納品物にOSSが含まれるケースも頻繁に起こっています。適切な脆弱性対応、ライセンス対応などを実施するため、サプライチェーンの中でのOSSの情報共有が重要になってきています。

JP: What are the benefits of Japanese companies adopting standards such as OpenChain and SPDX?

OpenChainやSPDXなどの標準を採用している日本企業のメリットは何ですか?

ME: Companies need to do a wide range of things to ensure proper OSS license compliance, so some guidance is needed. The OpenChain Specification, which has become an ISO as a guideline for that, is particularly useful. In fact, several companies that responded to this survey have built an OSS license compliance process based on the OpenChain Specification.

Also, from the perspective of supply chain management, it is thought that if each supply chain company obtains OpenChain certification, software transparency will increase, and appropriate OSS utilization will be promoted.

In addition, by participating in OpenChain’s Japan Working Group, companies can share the best practices of each company and work together to solve problems.

Since SPDX is a leading international standard for SBOM, it is very useful to use it when exchanging information about OSS in the supply chain from the viewpoint of compatibility.

Japanese companies use the SPDX standard and actively contribute to the formulation of SPDX specifications like SPDX Lite.

企業がOSSライセンスコンプライアンスを適切に行うために行うべきことは多岐に渡るために何かしらの指針が必要です。そのための指針としてISOになったOpenChain Specificationは非常に有用なものです。実際、今回の調査に回答した複数の企業がOpenChain Specificationに基づいてOSSライセンスコンプライアンスプロセスを構築し、認証を取得しています。

また、サプライチェーンマネジメントの観点からも、サプライチェーン各社がOpenChain認証を取得することで、ソフトウエアの透過性が高まり、適切なOSSの利活用を促進されると考えられます。

更にOpenChainのJPWGに参加することで、各社のベストプラクティスを共有したり、協力して課題解決をすることもできます。

SPDXは重要性の高まっているSBOMの有力な国際標準であるため、サプライチェーン内でOSSに関する情報を交換する場合に、SPDXを利用することは互換性等の観点から非常に有益です。

日本企業はSPDXの標準を利用するだけではなく、SPDX LiteのようにSPDXの使用策定にも積極的にコントリビューションしています。

JP: Thank you, Endo-san! It has been great speaking with you today.

遠藤さん、ありがとうございました!本日は素晴らしい議論になりました。

The post Interview with Masato Endo, OpenChain Project Japan appeared first on Linux Foundation.

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‘Master,’ ‘Slave’ and the Fight Over Offensive Terms in Computing (Kate Conger, New York Times, April 13, 2021)

Friday 7th of May 2021 12:14:49 AM

Nearly a year after the Internet Engineering Task Force took up a plan to replace words that could be considered racist, the debate is still raging.

Anyone who joined a video call during the pandemic probably has a global volunteer organization called the Internet Engineering Task Force to thank for making the technology work. The group, which helped create the technical foundations of the internet, designed the language that allows most video to run smoothly online. It made it possible for someone with a Gmail account to communicate with a friend who uses Yahoo, and for shoppers to safely enter their credit card information on e-commerce sites.

Now the organization is tackling an even thornier issue: getting rid of computer engineering terms that evoke racist history, like “master” and “slave” and “whitelist” and “blacklist.”

But what started as an earnest proposal has stalled as members of the task force have debated the history of slavery and the prevalence of racism in tech. Some companies and tech organizations have forged ahead anyway, raising the possibility that important technical terms will have different meanings to different people — a troubling proposition for an engineering world that needs broad agreement so technologies work together.

While the fight over terminology reflects the intractability of racial issues in society, it is also indicative of a peculiar organizational culture that relies on informal consensus to get things done.

The Internet Engineering Task Force eschews voting, and it often measures consensus by asking opposing factions of engineers to hum during meetings. The hums are then assessed by volume and ferocity. Vigorous humming, even from only a few people, could indicate strong disagreement, a sign that consensus has not yet been reached.

The I.E.T.F. has created rigorous standards for the internet and for itself. Until 2016, it required the documents in which its standards are published to be precisely 72 characters wide and 58 lines long, a format adapted from the era when programmers punched their code into paper cards and fed them into early IBM computers.

“We have big fights with each other, but our intent is always to reach consensus,” said Vint Cerf, one of the founders of the task force and a vice president at Google. “I think that the spirit of the I.E.T.F. still is that, if we’re going to do anything, let’s try to do it one way so that we can have a uniform expectation that things will function.”

The group is made up of about 7,000 volunteers from around the world. It has two full-time employees, an executive director and a spokesman, whose work is primarily funded by meeting dues and the registration fees of dot-org internet domains. It cannot force giants like Amazon or Apple to follow its guidance, but tech companies often choose to do so because the I.E.T.F. has created elegant solutions for engineering problems.

Its standards are hashed out during fierce debates on email lists and at in-person meetings. The group encourages participants to fight for what they believe is the best approach to a technical problem.

While shouting matches are not uncommon, the Internet Engineering Task Force is also a place where young technologists break into the industry. Attending meetings is a rite of passage, and engineers sometimes leverage their task force proposals into job offers from tech giants.

In June, against the backdrop of the Black Lives Matter protests, engineers at social media platforms, coding groups and international standards bodies re-examined their code and asked themselves: Was it racist? Some of their databases were called “masters” and were surrounded by “slaves,” which received information from the masters and answered queries on their behalf, preventing them from being overwhelmed. Others used “whitelists” and “blacklists” to filter content.

Mallory Knodel, the chief technology officer at the Center for Democracy and Technology, a policy organization, wrote a proposal suggesting that the task force use more neutral language. Invoking slavery was alienating potential I.E.T.F. volunteers, and the terms should be replaced with ones that more clearly described what the technology was doing, argued Ms. Knodel and the co-author of her proposal, Nielsten Oever, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Amsterdam. “Blocklist” would explain what a blacklist does, and “primary” could replace “master,” they wrote.

On an email list, responses trickled in. Some were supportive. Others proposed revisions. And some were vehemently opposed. One respondent wrote that Ms. Knodel’s draft tried to construct a new “Ministry of Truth.”

Amid insults and accusations, many members announced that the battle had become too toxic and that they would abandon the discussion.

The pushback didn’t surprise Ms. Knodel, who had proposed similar changes in 2018 without gaining traction. The engineering community is “quite rigid and averse to these sorts of changes,” she said. “They are averse to conversations about community comportment, behavior — the human side of things.”

In July, the Internet Engineering Task Force’s steering group issued a rare statement about the draft from Ms. Knodel and Mr. ten Oever. “Exclusionary language is harmful,” it said.

A month later, two alternative proposals emerged. One came from Keith Moore, an I.E.T.F. contributor who initially backed Ms. Knodel’s draft before creating his own. His cautioned that fighting over language could bottleneck the group’s work and argued for minimizing disruption.

The other came from Bron Gondwana, the chief executive of the email company Fastmail, who said he had been motivated by the acid debate on the mailing list.

“I could see that there was no way we would reach a happy consensus,” he said. “So I tried to thread the needle.”

Mr. Gondwana suggested that the group should follow the tech industry’s example and avoid terms that would distract from technical advances.

Last month, the task force said it would create a new group to consider the three drafts and decide how to proceed, and members involved in the discussion appeared to favor Mr. Gondwana’s approach. Lars Eggert, the organization’s chair and the technical director for networking at the company NetApp, said he hoped guidance on terminology would be issued by the end of the year.

The rest of the industry isn’t waiting. The programming community that maintains MySQL, a type of database software, chose “source” and “replica” as replacements for “master” and “slave.” GitHub, the code repository owned by Microsoft, opted for “main” instead of “master.”

In July, Twitter also replaced a number of terms after Regynald Augustin, an engineer at the company, came across the word “slave” in Twitter’s code and advocated change.

But while the industry abandons objectionable terms, there is no consensus about which new words to use. Without guidance from the Internet Engineering Task Force or another standards body, engineers decide on their own. The World Wide Web Consortium, which sets guidelines for the web, updated its style guide last summer to “strongly encourage” members to avoid terms like “master” and “slave,” and the IEEE, an organization that sets standards for chips and other computing hardware, is weighing a similar change.

Other tech workers are trying to solve the problem by forming a clearinghouse for ideas about changing language.

That effort, the Inclusive Naming Initiative, aims to provide guidance to standards bodies and companies that want to change their terminology but don’t know where to begin.

The group got together while working on an open-source software project, Kubernetes, which like the I.E.T.F. accepts contributions from volunteers. Like many others in tech, it began the debate over terminology last summer.

“We saw this blank space,” said Priyanka Sharma, the general manager of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, a nonprofit that manages Kubernetes. Ms. Sharma worked with several other Kubernetes contributors, including Stephen Augustus and Celeste Horgan, to create a rubric that suggests alternative words and guides people through the process of making changes without causing systems to break. Several major tech companies, including IBM and Cisco, have signed on to follow the guidance.

Priyanka Sharma and several other tech workers in the Inclusive Naming Initiative came up
with a rubric to suggest alternative words

Although the Internet Engineering Task Force is moving more slowly, Mr. Eggert said it would eventually establish new guidelines. But the debate over the nature of racism — and whether the organization should weigh in on the matter — has continued on its mailing list.

In a subversion of an April Fools’ Day tradition within the group, several members submitted proposals mocking diversity efforts and the push to alter terminology in tech.

Two prank proposals were removed hours later because they were “racist and deeply disrespectful,” Mr. Eggert wrote in an email to task force participants, while a third remained up.

“We build consensus the hard way, so to speak, but in the end the consensus is usually stronger because people feel their opinions were reflected,” Mr. Eggert said. “I wish we could be faster, but on topics like this one that are controversial, it’s better to be slower.”

Kate Conger is a technology reporter in the San Francisco bureau, where she covers the gig economy and social media. @kateconger

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Open Mainframe Project Launches Call for Proposals for the 2nd Annual Open Mainframe Summit on September 22-23

Wednesday 5th of May 2021 10:00:00 PM

Registration for the Virtual Event is now Open

SAN FRANCISCO, May 5, 2021 The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, today announced plans for its 2nd annual Open Mainframe Summit, the premier mainframe event of 2021. The event, set for September 22-23, is open to students, developers, users and contributors of Open Mainframe projects from around the globe looking to learn, network and collaborate. As a virtual event again this year, Open Mainframe Summit will feature content tracks that tackle both business and technical strategies for enterprise development and deployment.

In Open Mainframe Project’s inaugural event last year, more than 380 registrants from 175 companies joined the two-day conference that featured 36 sessions. Some of the most popular sessions were the Women in Tech panel, COBOL sessions, new mainframer journey and project overview sessions for Ambitus, Feilong, Polycephaly, and Zowe. The event report can be found here and all of the videos can be watched here.

“Open Mainframe Project is becoming the gateway to all educational tools and initiatives that run some of the world’s biggest enterprise systems,” said John Mertic, Director of Program Management at the Linux Foundation. “For our inaugural event last year, we merely dipped our toes in the water as a new summit. This year, we’ll see more change makers speaking about open source innovation, creativity and diversity in mainframe related technologies. We look forward to igniting conversations that are going to positively impact all facets of mainframes.”

Call for Proposals

The Call for Proposals is now open and will be accepting submissions until July 16, 2021. Interested speakers can submit proposals in five tracks such as business overview, Linux on Z, z/OS, education and training and diversity, equity and inclusion. Options for presentations include lightning talks, 30-minute sessions and panel discussions.

A program committee, which will include maintainers, active community members and project leaders, will review and rate the proposals once all the submissions are in. This year, Open Mainframe Project welcomes Greg MacKinnon, Distinguished Engineer at Broadcom, Inc; Joe Winchester, Technical Staff Member at IBM; Kimberly Andersson, Director of Experience Design at Rocket Software; Stacey Miller, Product Marketing Manager at SUSE; and Harry Williams, Chief Technology Officer at Marist College as the 2021 Open Mainframe Summit program committee.

Submit a proposal here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-mainframe-summit/program/cfp/.

Whether a company is a member or contributor of Open Mainframe Project or is sponsoring the event has no impact on whether talks from their developers will be selected. However, being a community leader does have an impact, as program committee members will often rate talks from the creators or leaders of an open source project more highly. Focus on work with an open source project, whether it is one of the Open Mainframe Project’s 18 hosted projects or working groups that adds value to the ecosystem.

Conference Registration for the online event is $50 for general attendance and $15 for academia. Registration is now open, click here to register.

Thank you Sponsors

Open Mainframe Summit is made possible with support from our Platinum Sponsors Broadcom Mainframe Software, Rocket Software, and SUSE; our Gold Sponsor Vicom Infinity; and our Academic and Community Sponsors CD Foundation and the Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS). To become a sponsor, click here.

For more about Open Mainframe Project, visit https://www.openmainframeproject.org/

About the Open Mainframe Project

The Open Mainframe Project is intended to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. With a vision of Open Source on the Mainframe as the standard for enterprise class systems and applications, the project’s mission is to build community and adoption of Open Source on the mainframe by eliminating barriers to Open Source adoption on the mainframe, demonstrating value of the mainframe on technical and business levels, and strengthening collaboration points and resources for the community to thrive. Learn more about the project at https://www.openmainframeproject.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Linux Foundation Launches Open Source Digital Infrastructure Project for Agriculture, Enables Global Collaboration Among Industry, Government and Academia

Wednesday 5th of May 2021 08:00:00 PM

AgStack Foundation will build and sustain the global data infrastructure for food and agriculture to help scale digital transformation and address climate change, rural engagement and food and water security

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., May 5, 2021 –  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the launch of the AgStack Foundation, the open source digital infrastructure project for the world’s agriculture ecosystem. AgStack Foundation will improve global agriculture efficiency through the creation, maintenance and enhancement of free, reusable, open and specialized digital infrastructure for data and applications.

Founding members and contributors include leaders from both the technology and agriculture industries, as well as across sectors and geographies. Members and partners include Agralogics, Call for Code, Centricity Global, Digital Green, Farm Foundation, farmOS, HPE, IBM, Mixing Bowl & Better Food Ventures, NIAB, OpenTeam, Our Sci, Produce Marketing Association, Purdue University / OATS & Agricultural Informatics Lab, the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC-ANR) and University of California Santa Barbara SmartFarm Project.

“The global Agriculture ecosystem desperately needs a digital makeover. There is too much loss of productivity and innovation due to the absence of re-usable tools and data. I’m excited to lead this community of leaders, contributors and members – from across sectors and countries – to help build this common and re-usable resource – AgStack – that will help every stakeholder in global agriculture with free and open digital tools and data,” said Sumer Johal, Executive Director of AgStack.

Thirty-three percent of all food produced is wasted, while nine percent of the people in the world are hungry or undernourished. These societal drivers are compounded with legacy technology systems that are too slow and inefficient and can’t work across the growing and more complex agricultural supply chain. AgStack will use collaboration and open source software to build the 21st century digital infrastructure that will be a catalyst for innovation on new applications, efficiencies and scale.

AgStack consists of an open repository to create and publish models, free and easy access to public data, interoperable frameworks for cross-project use and topic-specific extensions and toolboxes. It will leverage existing technologies such as agriculture standards (AgGateway, UN-FAO, CAFA, USDA and NASA-AR); public data (Landsat, Sentinel, NOAA and Soilgrids; models (UC-ANR IPM), and open source projects like Hyperledger, Kubernetes, Open Horizon, Postgres, Django and more.

“We’re pleased to provide the forum for AgStack to be built and to grow,” said Mike Dolan, general manager and senior vice president of projects at the Linux Foundation. “It’s clear that by using open source software to standardize the digital infrastructure for agriculture, that AgStack can reduce cost, accelerate integration and enable innovation. It’s amazing to see industries like agriculture use open source principles to innovate.”

For more information about AgStack, please visit: http://www.agstack.org

Member/Partner Statements

Call for Code

“Through Call for Code and IBM’s tech-for-good programs, we’ve seen amazing grassroots innovation created by developers who build solutions to address local farming issues that affect them personally,” said Daniel Krook, IBM CTO for Call for Code. “As thriving, sustainable open source projects hosted at the Linux Foundation, applications like Agrolly and Liquid Prep have access to a strong ecosystem of partners and will be able to accelerate their impact through a shared framework of open machine learning models, data sets, libraries, message formats, and APIs such as those provided by AgStack.”

Centricity Global

“Interoperability means working together and open source has proven to be the most practical means of doing so. Centricity Global looks forward to bringing our teams, tools and applications to the AgStack community and to propelling projects that deliver meaningful value long-term,” said Drew Zabrocki, Centricity Global. “Now is the time to get things done. The docking concept at AgStack is a novel way to bring people and technology together under a common, yet sovereign framework; I see great potential for facilitating interoperability and data sovereignty in a way that delivers tangible value on the farm forward across the supply value chain.”

Digital Green

“The explosion of agri-tech innovations from large companies to startups to governments to non-profits represents a game changer for farmers in both the Global South and North.  At the same time, it’s critical that we build digital infrastructure that ensures that the impact of these changes enables the aspirations of those most marginalized and builds their resilience, particularly in the midst of climate change. We’re excited about joining hands with AgStack with videos produced by & for farmers and FarmStack, a secure data sharing protocol, that fosters community and trust and puts farmers back in the center of our food & agricultural system,” said Rikin Gandhi, Co-founder and Executive Director.

Farm Foundation

“The advancements in digital agriculture over the past 10 years have led to more data than ever before—data that can be used to inform business decisions, improve supply and demand planning and increase efficiencies across stakeholders. However, the true potential of all that data won’t be fully realized without achieving interoperability via an open source environment. Interoperable data is more valuable data, and that will lead to benefits for farmers and others throughout the food and ag value chain,” said Martha King, Vice President of Programs and Projects, Farm Foundation.

farmOS

“AgStack’s goal of creating a shared community infrastructure for agricultural datasets, models, frameworks, and tools fills a much-needed gap in the current agtech software landscape. Making these freely available to other software projects allows them to focus on their unique value and build upon the work of others. We in the farmOS community are eager to leverage these shared resources in the open source record keeping tools we are building together,” said Michael Stenta, founder and lead developer, farmOS.

HPE

“The world’s food supply needs digital innovation that currently faces challenges of adoption due to the lack of a common, secure, community-maintained digital infrastructure. AgStack – A Linux Foundation’s Project, is creating this much needed open source digital infrastructure for accelerating innovation. We at Hewlett Packard Enterprise are excited about contributing actionable insights and learnings to solve data challenges that this initiative can provide and we’re committed to its success!” said Janice Zdankus, VP, Innovation for Social Impact, Office of the CTO, Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

Mixing Bowl & Better Food Ventures

“There are a lot of people talking about interoperability; it is encouraging to see people jump in to develop functional tools to make it happen. We share the AgStack vision and look forward to collaborating with the community to enable interoperability at scale,” said Rob Trice, Partner, The Mixing Bowl & Better Food Ventures.

NIAB

“Climate change is a global problem and agriculture needs to do its part to reduce greenhouse gas emissions during all stages of primary production. This requires digital innovation and a common, global, community-maintained digital infrastructure to create the efficient, resilient, biodiverse and low-emissions food production systems that the world needs. These systems must draw on the best that precision agriculture has to offer and aligned innovations in crop science, linked together through open data solutions. AgStack – A Linux Foundation Project, is creating this much needed open-source digital infrastructure for accelerating innovation. NIAB are excited to join this initiative and will work to develop a platform that brings together crop and data science at scale. As the UK’s fastest growing, independent crop research organization NIAB provides crop science, agronomy and data science expertise across a broad range of arable and horticultural crops,” said Dr Richard Harrison, Director of NIAB Cambridge Crop Research.

OpenTEAM

“Agriculture is a shared human endeavor and global collaboration is necessary to translate our available knowledge into solutions that work on the ground necessary to adapt and mitigate climate change, improve livelihoods, and biodiversity as well as the produce of abundant food fiber and energy.  Agriculture is at the foundation of manufacture and commerce and AgStack represents a collaborative effort at a scale necessary to meet the urgency of the moment and unlock our shared innovative capacity through free, reusable, open digital infrastructure.  OpenTEAM is honored to join with the mission to equip producers with tools that both support data sovereignty for trusted transactions while also democratizing site specific agricultural knowledge regardless of scale, culture or geography,” said Dr. Dorn Cox, project lead and founder of Open Technology Ecosystem for Agricultural Management and research director for Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment.

Our Sci

“AgStack provides a framework for a scalable base of open source software, and the shared commitment to keep it alive and growing.  We’re excited to see it succeed!” said Greg Austic, owner, Our Sci.

Produce Marketing Association

“The digitization of data will have tremendous benefits for the Fresh Produce and Floral industry in the areas of traceability, quality management, quality prediction and other efficiencies through supply chain visibility. The key is challenges to adoption is interoperability and the development of a common, community-maintained digital infrastructure. I am confident that AgStack – A Linux Foundation’s Project, can create this much needed open-source digital infrastructure for accelerating innovation. We at Produce Marketing Association are excited about this initiative and we are committed to its success,” said Ed Treacy, VP of Supply Chain and Sustainability.

Purdue University

“We need fundamental technical infrastructure to enable open innovation in agriculture, including ontologies, models, and tools. Through the AgStack Project, the Linux Foundation will provide valuable cohesion and development capacity to support shared, community-maintained infrastructure. At the Agricultural Informatics Lab, we’re committed to enabling resilience food and agricultural systems through deliberate design and development of such infrastructure,” said Ankita Raturi, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Informatics Lab, Purdue University.

“True interoperability requires a big community and we’re excited to see the tools that we’ve brought to the open-source ag community benefiting new audiences.  OATS Center at Purdue University looks forward to docking the Trellis Framework for supply chain, market access and regulatory compliance through AgStack for the benefit of all,” said Aaron Ault, Co-Founder OATS Center at Purdue University.

UC Davis

“Translating 100+ years of UC agricultural research into usable digital software and applications is a critical goal in the UC partnership with the AgStack open source community. We are excited about innovators globally using UC research and applying it to their local crops through novel digital technologies,” said Glenda Humiston, VP of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California.

“Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are critical to food and agriculture transformation, and will require new computational models and massive data sets to create working technology solutions from seed to shelf. The AI Institute for Next Generation Food Systems is excited to partner with the AgStack open source community to make our work globally available to accelerate the transformation,” said Ilias Tagkopoulos, Professor, Computer Science at UC Davis and Director, AI Institute of Next Generation Food Systems.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Jennifer Cloer
for Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

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10 great sysadmin articles you might have missed from April 2021

Tuesday 4th of May 2021 08:40:49 PM

10 great sysadmin articles you might have missed from April 2021

The best of April 2021 from Enable Sysadmin. Thank you to our contributors and to our readers.
tcarriga
Tue, 5/4/2021 at 1:40pm

Image

Image by msandersmusic from Pixabay

April 2021 was a great month for Enable Sysadmin. We published 30 articles and received 549,684 pageviews from over 370k unique visitors. Today, we are looking back at our top ten articles to give readers a chance to catch up on any of the great content they may have missed. In this list, you will see various topics covered and we are confident that some, if not all will be of interest to you.

Topics:  
Linux  
Linux Administration  
Automation  
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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Linux Foundation & CNCF Launch Free Kubernetes on Edge Training

Tuesday 4th of May 2021 03:00:36 PM

Offered on the edX.org learning platform, the new online course explores use cases and applications of Kubernetes at the edge

SAN FRANCISCO, May 4, 2021 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which builds sustainable ecosystems for cloud native software, today at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe (Virtual) announced the availability of a new online training course on edX.org, the online learning platform founded by Harvard and MIT. The course, Introduction to Kubernetes on Edge with K3s (LFS156x), takes a deep dive into the use cases and applications of Kubernetes at the edge using examples, labs, and a technical overview of the K3s project and the cloud native edge ecosystem.

In this 15 hour course, participants will learn the use cases for running compute in edge locations and about various supporting projects and foundations such as LF Edge and CNCF. The course covers how to deploy applications to the edge with open source tools such as K3s and k3sup, and how those tools can be applied to low-power hardware such as the Raspberry Pi. Students will learn the challenges associated with edge compute, such as partial availability and the need for remote access. Through practical examples, students will gain experience of deploying applications to Kubernetes and get hands-on with object storage, MQTT, and OpenFaaS. It also introduces the fleet management and GitOps models of deployment, and helps the student understand messaging, and how to interface with sensors and real hardware.

LFS156x is designed primarily for developers who need to learn about the growing impact the cloud native movement is having on modernizing edge deployments, though others working with Kubernetes or edge computing will find the content of use.

The course was developed by Alex Ellis, a CNCF Ambassador and the Founder of OpenFaaS and inlets. Ellis is a respected expert on serverless and cloud native computing. He founded OpenFaaS, one of the most popular open-source serverless projects, where he has built the community via writing, speaking, and extensive personal engagement. As a consultant and CNCF Ambassador, he helps companies around the world navigate the cloud native landscape and build great developer experiences. Ellis also authored the existing Introduction to Serverless on Kubernetes (LFS157x) course.

“K3s fills a very specific need and helps lower the barrier to entry for development and operation teams,” said Alex Ellis, Founder of Inlets and OpenFaaS, CNCF Ambassador. “I’ve seen the project grow from Darren’s initial post on Hacker News, to a GA, production-ready Kubernetes distribution housed within CNCF. I’m excited to share this course with the community and customers alike, and am looking forward to seeing increased use of Kubernetes at the edge.”

Introduction to Kubernetes on Edge with K3s is available to begin immediately. Auditing the course through edX is free for ten weeks, or participants can opt for a paid verified certificate of completion, which provides access to the course for a full year and additional assessments and content to deepen the learning experience. 

About the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing empowers organizations to build and run scalable applications with an open source software stack in public, private, and hybrid clouds. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of the global technology infrastructure, including Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy. CNCF brings together the industry’s top developers, end users, and vendors, and runs the largest open source developer conferences in the world. Supported by more than 500 members, including the world’s largest cloud computing and software companies, as well as over 200 innovative startups, CNCF is part of the nonprofit Linux Foundation. For more information, please visit www.cncf.io

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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2021 State of the Edge Report Shows Impact of COVID-19 on Edge Use

Tuesday 4th of May 2021 12:47:37 AM

Christine Hall writes in ITPRo:

A recent edge report by the Linux Foundation concluded that COVID-19 has changed the prognosis on which industries will have the largest edge computing architecture footprint going forward.

“Our 2021 analysis shows demand for edge infrastructure accelerating in a post-COVID-19 world,” said Matt Trifiro, co-chair of State of the Edge and CMO of the edge data center company Vapor IO, in a statement. “We’ve been observing this trend unfold in real-time as companies re-prioritize their digital transformation efforts to account for a more distributed workforce and a heightened need for automation. The new digital norms created in response to the pandemic will be permanent. This will intensify the deployment of new technologies like wireless 5G and autonomous vehicles, but will also impact nearly every sector of the economy, from industrial manufacturing to healthcare.”

Read more at ITPro

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Open-source software economics and community health analytics: Enter CHAOSS

Monday 3rd of May 2021 04:21:57 PM

George Anadiotis at ZDNet writes:

CHAOSS stands for Community Health Analytics Open Source Software. It’s a Linux Foundation project, and its roots go back 15 years ago. A research team at the University of Juan-Carlos in Madrid, Spain, was trying to understand how software is being built in open source.

There was no tooling to help them do that, so they built their own open-source software. That was the foundation of what is now called GrimoireLab: A set of free, open-source software tools for software development analytics.

The tools gather data from several platforms involved in software development (Git, GitHub, Jira, Bugzilla, Gerrit, Mailing lists, Jenkins, Slack, Discourse, Confluence, StackOverflow, and more), merge and organize it in a database, and produce visualizations, actionable dashboards, and analytics.

Read more at ZDNet

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Certification Exam Prices Increase July 1 – Lock in Current Pricing

Friday 30th of April 2021 09:00:41 PM

Since we launched our first certification exam in August of 2014, all Linux Foundation performance-based certification exams have been priced at $300. To address the rise in costs associated with administering these exams, we will be implementing a modest price increase effective July 1, 2021. 

All performance-based exams will increase in price from $300 to $375. Bundles of performance-based certifications and their associated training courses will increase from $499 to $575. Bootcamp pricing will also increase in price from $999 to $1,200, and the Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate (LFCA) knowledge-based exam will increase from $200 to $250. We continue to provide the industry’s only free-retake guarantee (an automatic second attempt if your first is unsuccessful on most exams), and are in the process adding other features for exam takers such as an enhanced interface and exam simulation labs.

We strive to make quality open source certifications as accessible as possible so we want to provide plenty of notice, and the old pricing will remain in place through June 30th.

Don’t forget that our Linux exams and training courses including LFCA, LFCE and LFCS are discounted 30% through the end of 2021 in recognition of the 30th anniversary of Linux. Use code LINUX30 at checkout to take advantage of these savings.

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May the Fourth be with you via Podman

Thursday 29th of April 2021 07:47:37 PM

A unique approach to rewatching the original Star Wars movie in a container.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post May the Fourth be with you via Podman appeared first on Linux.com.

The Linux Foundation Announces Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 Will Move From Dublin, Ireland to Seattle, Washington

Wednesday 28th of April 2021 07:40:00 AM

Calls for Speaking Proposals close June 13OSPOCon and Linux Security Summit will also move to SeattleAll events will take place September 27 – October 1

SAN FRANCISCO, April 27, 2021The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced today that Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021, along with Linux Security Summit and OSPOCon, will take place in Seattle, Washington, USA, from September 27 – October 1. 

Earlier in the year, it was announced that instead of separate North America and Europe editions of Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference (OS Summit + ELC), only one would be held in 2021, located in Dublin, Ireland. The decision to move these events from Dublin, Ireland to Seattle, Washington, USA, has been made due to the current state of vaccination rates in Europe and upon review of past attendee survey results regarding where and when they would feel comfortable traveling this year.  

OS Summit + ELC will be held in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual offerings, to ensure that everyone who wants to participate is able to do so.

KVM Forum, which was also scheduled to take place in Dublin, will now be a virtual event taking place September 15 -16. New details on Linux Plumbers Conference and Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit, also previously scheduled in Dublin, will be announced shortly. A second OSPOCon – OSPOCon Europe, will be held in London on October 6, 2021, with more details coming soon.

Registration for all events will open in June, after more details on local regulations and venue safety plans are available. 

Calls for Speaking Proposals
The Call for Speaking Proposals for OS Summit + ELC and OSPOCon are open through Sunday, June 13 at 11:59pm PDT.  Interested community members are encouraged to apply here. Speakers will be able to speak in person or remotely. 

Linux Security Summit’s Call for Proposals is open through Sunday, June 27 at 11:59pm PDT.  Applications are being accepted here.

Sponsorships
Sponsorships are available for all events. Benefits include speaking opportunities, prominent branding, opportunities to support diversity and inclusion, lead generation activities, event passes, and more. View the sponsorship prospectus here or email us to learn more.  

Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 is made possible thanks to Diamond Sponsors IBM and Red Hat, Platinum Sponsor Huawei and Gold Sponsor Soda Foundation, among others. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here.

OSPOCon is presented by The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group and is made possible by Host Sponsors Eclipse Foundation and Huawei, and Supporter Sponsor Sauce Labs. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here

Linux Security Summit is made possible by General Sponsor Technology Innovation Institute, and Supporter Sponsors IBM and Indeed. For information on becoming a sponsor, click here

Members of the press who would like to request a media pass should contact Kristin O’Connell at koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

About The Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

Follow The Linux Foundation on TwitterFacebook, and LinkedIn for all the latest news, event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

####

Media Contact:

Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post The Linux Foundation Announces Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 Will Move From Dublin, Ireland to Seattle, Washington appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post The Linux Foundation Announces Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 Will Move From Dublin, Ireland to Seattle, Washington appeared first on Linux.com.

Edit Post

Wednesday 28th of April 2021 07:18:03 AM
The Linux Foundation Announces Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 will move from Dublin, Ireland to Seattle, Washington

Calls for Speaking Proposals close June 13OSPOCon and Linux Security Summit will also move to SeattleAll events will take place September 27 – October 1

SAN FRANCISCO, April 27, 2021The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced today that Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021, along with Linux Security Summit and OSPOCon, will take place in Seattle, Washington, USA, from September 27 – October 1. 

Earlier in the year, it was announced that instead of separate North America and Europe editions of Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference (OS Summit + ELC), only one would be held in 2021, located in Dublin, Ireland. The decision to move these events from Dublin, Ireland to Seattle, Washington, USA, has been made due to the current state of vaccination rates in Europe and upon review of past attendee survey results regarding where and when they would feel comfortable traveling this year.  

OS Summit + ELC will be held in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual offerings, to ensure that everyone who wants to participate is able to do so.

KVM Forum, which was also scheduled to take place in Dublin, will now be a virtual event taking place September 15 – 16. New details on Linux Plumbers Conference and Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit, also previously scheduled in Dublin, will be announced shortly. A second OSPOCon – OSPOCon Europe, will be held in London on October 6, 2021, with more details coming soon.

Registration for all events will open in June, after more details on local regulations and venue safety plans are available. 

Calls for Speaking Proposals
The Call for Speaking Proposals for OS Summit + ELC and OSPOCon are open through Sunday, June 13 at 11:59pm PDT.  Interested community members are encouraged to apply here. Speakers will be able to speak in person or remotely. 

Linux Security Summit’s Call for Proposals is open through Sunday, June 27 at 11:59pm PDT.  Applications are being accepted here.

Sponsorships
Sponsorships are available for all events. Benefits include speaking opportunities, prominent branding, opportunities to support diversity and inclusion, lead generation activities, event passes, and more. View the sponsorship prospectus here or email us to learn more.  

Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 is made possible thanks to Diamond Sponsors IBM and Red Hat, Platinum Sponsor Huawei and Gold Sponsor Soda Foundation, among others. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here.

OSPOCon is presented by The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group and is made possible by Host Sponsors Eclipse Foundation and Huawei, and Supporter Sponsor Sauce Labs. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here

Linux Security Summit is made possible by General Sponsor Technology Innovation Institute, and Supporter Sponsors IBM and Indeed. For information on becoming a sponsor, click here

Members of the press who would like to request a media pass should contact Kristin O’Connell at koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

About The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

####

Media Contact:
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post Edit Post appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Edit Post appeared first on Linux.com.

BPF: Application Development and libbpf

Tuesday 27th of April 2021 10:00:00 PM

Notes on BPF: Building applications using libbpf
Click to Read More at Oracle Linux Kernel Development

The post BPF: Application Development and libbpf appeared first on Linux.com.

Introducing the Production Engineering Track of the MLH Fellowship, powered by Facebook

Tuesday 27th of April 2021 09:27:07 PM

This article was originally posted at Major League Hacking

This Summer, Major League Hacking (MLH) is launching the Production Engineering Track of the MLH Fellowship, powered by Facebook. This is a 12-week educational program that will use industry leading curriculum from the Linux Foundation Training & Certification and hands-on project-based learning to teach students how to become Production Engineers. The program will provide opportunities to 100 aspiring software engineers to broaden their skills and career options, by learning important Production Engineering and DevOps skills. The program will run between June 7 – August 30, 2021 and will be open to United States, Mexico, and Canada based students who are enrolled in a 4 year degree granting program. Applications are open and will run until May 28, 2021.

What is Production Engineering anyway?

Early career software engineers are passionate and motivated to learn new skills and create a positive impact on the world, but many have not been exposed to the wider array of career options that are available to them. Production Engineering, also known as Site Reliability Engineering and DevOps, is one of the most in-demand skill sets that leading technology companies are hiring for, yet it is not widely available as an educational option in university settings. 

Production Engineers (PEs) at Facebook are a hybrid between software and systems engineers and are core to engineering efforts that keep Facebook running smoothly and scaling efficiently. PEs work within Facebook’s product and infrastructure teams to make sure their products and services are reliable and scalable. This means writing code and debugging hard problems in production systems across Facebook services like Instagram, WhatsApp, and Oculus as well as backend services like Storage, Cache and Network.

What is the Production Engineering Track of the MLH Fellowship?

Initially launched in Summer 2020, the MLH Fellowship pairs early career software engineers with widely used open source projects like React, Jest, Docusaurus. This gives them the opportunity to apply their knowledge to real world projects, which helps them learn important concepts and patterns while also having production-level code to showcase in their portfolio. Through the Fellowship, MLH has created opportunities for hundreds of developers from around the world to level up and hone their skills in a 12-week cohort surrounded by peers and expert mentors. The Production Engineering Track takes this proven model and expands it to a broader range of technology disciplines, creating even more valuable opportunities for developers starting off their careers. 

Program participants will gain practical skills thanks to educational content from Linux Foundation Training & Certification’s LFS201 – Essentials of System Administration training course, which covers how to administer, configure and upgrade Linux systems, along with the tools and concepts necessary to efficiently build and manage a production Linux infrastructure. By pairing this industry leading curriculum with hands-on project-based learning, students in the Production Engineering Track can build on their foundational software engineering knowledge to learn a broader array of technology skills and open the door to a variety of exciting and challenging new career options. Creating these types of non-traditional learning experiences helps  empower developers from many diverse backgrounds and educational institutions to accelerate their careers and make an impact on the world.

Who is eligible?

The Production Engineering Track starts in June, and guarantees a $3,600 educational stipend to each participant. Applications are open now until May 28, 2021. Eligible students are rising sophomores or juniors who are United States, Mexico, and Canada based, enrolled in a 4 year degree granting program, and able to code. MLH invites and encourages people to apply who identify as women or non-binary. MLH also invites and encourages people to apply who identify as Black/African American or LatinX. In partnership with Facebook, MLH is committed to building a more diverse and inclusive tech industry and providing learning opportunities to under-represented technologists.

Learn more and apply

The post Introducing the Production Engineering Track of the MLH Fellowship, powered by Facebook appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

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More in Tux Machines

Videos/Shows: Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 21.04, Coder Radio, and KDE Breeze Redesign and Blue Ocean

NetBSD: aiomixer, X/Open Curses and ncurses, and other news

aiomixer is an application that I've been maintaining outside of NetBSD for a few years. It was available as a package, and was a "graphical" (curses, terminal-based) mixer for NetBSD's audio API, inspired by programs like alsamixer. For some time I've thought that it should be integrated into the NetBSD base system - it's small and simple, very useful, and many developers and users had it installed (some told me that they would install it on all of their machines that needed audio output). For my particular use case, as well as my NetBSD laptop, I have some small NetBSD machines around the house plugged into speakers that I play music from. Sometimes I like to SSH into them to adjust the playback volume, and it's often easier to do visually than with mixerctl(1). However, there was one problem: when I first wrote aiomixer 2 years ago, I was intimidated by the curses API, so opted to use the Curses Development Kit instead. This turned out to be a mistake, as not only was CDK inflexible for an application like aiomixer, it introduced a hard dependency on ncurses. Read more

Core Scheduling Looks Like It Will Be Ready For Linux 5.14 To Avoid Disabling SMT/HT

It looks like the years-long effort around CPU core scheduling that's been worked on by multiple vendors in light of CPU security vulnerabilities threatening SMT/HT security will see mainline later this summer with Linux 5.14. Linux core scheduling has been worked on by pretty much all of the hyperscalers and public cloud providers to improve security without disabling Hyper Threading. Core scheduling is ultimately about what resources can share a CPU core and ensuring potentially unsafe tasks don't run on a sibling thread of a trusted task. Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Automating RHEL for Edge image rollback with GreenBoot

    With the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.3, Red Hat announced an rpm-ostree version of RHEL targeted for Edge use cases called RHEL for Edge. One of the unique features of rpm-ostree is that when you update the operating system, a new deployment is created, and the previous deployment is also retained. This means that if there are issues on the updated version of the operating system, you can roll back to the previous deployment with a single rpm-ostree command, or by selecting the previous deployment in the GRUB boot loader. While this ability to manually roll back is very useful, it still requires manual intervention. Edge computing use case scenarios might be up in the tens or hundreds of thousands of nodes, and with this number of systems, automation is critical. In addition, in Edge deployments, these systems might be across the country or across the world, and it might not be practical to access a console on them in the event of issues with an updated image. This is why RHEL for Edge includes GreenBoot, which can automate RHEL for Edge operating system rollbacks. This post will cover an overview of how to get started with GreenBoot and will walk through an example of using GreenBoot.

  • Using Ansible to configure Podman containers

    In complex IT infrastructure, there are many repetitive tasks. Running those tasks successfully is not easy. Human error always presents a chance of failure. With help of Ansible, you perform all of the tasks through a remote host and, as the tasks are executed with playbooks, and those playbooks can be reused as many times as you need. In this article you will learn how to install and configure Ansible on Fedora Linux and describe how to use it to manage and configure Podman containers. Ansible Ansible is an open source infrastructure automation tool sponsored by Red Hat. It can deal with all the problems that come with large infrastructure, like installing & updating packages, taking backups, ensuring specific services are always running, and much more. You do this with a playbook which is written in YAML. Ansible playbooks can be used again and again, making the system administrator’s job less complex. Playbooks also eliminate repetitive tasks and can be easily modified. But we have many automation tools like Ansible, why use it? Unlike some other configuration management tools, Ansible is agentless: you don’t have to install anything on managed nodes. For more information about Ansible, see the Ansible tag in Fedora Magazine.

  • Getting better at counting rpm-ostree based systems

    Since the release of Fedora 32, a new mechanism has been in place to better count the number of Fedora users while respecting their privacy. This system is explicitly designed to make sure that no personally identifiable information is sent from counted systems. It also insures that the Fedora infrastructure does not collect any personal data. The nickname for this new counting mechanism is “Count Me”, from the option name. Details are available in DNF Better Counting change request for Fedora 32. In short, the Count Me mechanism works by telling Fedora servers how old your system is (with a very large approximation). This occurs randomly during a metadata refresh request performed by DNF.

  • Cockpit 244

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from Cockpit version 244 and Cockpit Machines 244.

  • A brief introduction to Ansible Vault

    Ansible Vault is an Ansible feature that helps you encrypt confidential information without compromising security.