Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux.com

Syndicate content
News For Open Source Professionals
Updated: 4 hours 39 min ago

How to create Bash scripts using external variables and embedded scripts

Thursday 29th of July 2021 08:31:15 PM

Use external variables and embedded scripts to enhance your Bash programming with interactive scripts.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post How to create Bash scripts using external variables and embedded scripts appeared first on Linux.com.

Learn the networking basics every sysadmin needs to know

Wednesday 28th of July 2021 07:55:39 PM

Networking is one of a sysadmin’s most important duties, so make sure you have the essentials covered.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Learn the networking basics every sysadmin needs to know appeared first on Linux.com.

Announcing new event focused on Building Cybersecurity into the Software Supply Chain, August 18, Virtual

Wednesday 28th of July 2021 02:24:53 AM

Modern day supply chains leave greater potential for vulnerabilities, and supply chain security should be a high priority for organizations. Vulnerabilities could be catastrophic, and lead to unnecessary costs, inefficient delivery schedules and a loss of intellectual property. 

In addition, over the last few years, supply chains have increasingly been exposed as a major weak point in organizational security. While security may be top of mind within company walls, you are only as strong as your most vulnerable supplier.

We are excited to bring the community a new event where folks can learn directly from experts who have been working on how to solve these vulnerabilities for almost a decade, to find out how to best protect their supply chain and mitigate potential disaster.

Anyone involved in ensuring their company’s supply chain is secure including security professionals, executive leadership and tech leaders.

The event is free to attend, and will take place virtually on August 18. It is comprised of nine sessions covering all aspects of protecting the supply chain, including talks on:

Generating SBOMs for IoT at Build TimeSecuring GCC & GLIBCBuilding Signing, Distributing SPDX SBOMs as Artifact Reference TypeSoftware Supply Chain Integrity with Sigstore

View all sessions, speakers and register to attend here.

The post Announcing new event focused on Building Cybersecurity into the Software Supply Chain, August 18, Virtual appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Announcing new event focused on Building Cybersecurity into the Software Supply Chain, August 18, Virtual appeared first on Linux.com.

The Linux Foundation, Prometeo, IBM, and Partners Announce New Firefighter Safety Open Source Project

Tuesday 27th of July 2021 10:31:36 PM

Prometeo Platform S.L. is open sourcing ‘Pyrrha’ to monitor and act on firefighters’ health and safety as they battle blazes, with support from Samsung

SAN FRANCISCO — The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host Pyrrha, created and contributed by Prometeo Platform S.L., in collaboration with IBM to help accelerate the development and deployment of firefighter safety technology around the world. In 2019, Prometeo was named the winner of the Call for Code Global Challenge and since then their technology has been further developed with updated hardware and enhanced software through work with the IBM volunteer Service Corps and leading ecosystem partners.

Climate change has created more dangerous conditions for firefighters by increasing the risk and extent of wildfires around the world. From Australia’s 2020 brushfires, to record-breaking wildfires in Spain and the Western United States, fires in recent years have increased in number, severity, and destruction, while posing greater immediate and long-term health risks to firefighters who battle these blazes. According to Cal Fire, California is already experiencing a 26% increase in 2021 wildfire activity and a 58% increase in acres burned compared to 2020.

Through the Pyrrha open source project, Prometeo, the Linux Foundation, and IBM aim to accelerate innovation around firefighter health monitoring and safety. By partnering with leading companies from the Call for Code ecosystem like Samsung, the goal is to customize and scale the solution around the world in an effort to help save lives.

“Samsung and IBM have collaborated for many years to create industry leading technologies that solve challenging societal and business problems. Now we’re excited to work together to advance tech for good and help combat the effects of climate change,” said Executive Vice President of Samsung B2B Mobile KC Choi. “As a huge proponent of open source technology, we see Call for Code as a unique opportunity to deploy real world solutions based on open source technologies. We’re excited to be able to equip award-winning teams like Prometeo with resources to strengthen their solution as it is actively tested, deployed, and now made available in open source. We also look forward to increasing our own participation in Call for Code.”

The Prometeo solution was created by a nurse, a firefighter, and developers as a system that uses artificial intelligence and the internet of things to guard the safety of firefighters. Over the past two years through collaboration with Call for Code ecosystem partners, Prometeo has improved its technology across offline usage, through integration with mobile phones and watches to provided two-way alerts, and in capturing the averages of toxin exposure over time. Through field tests in Spain in early 2020 and 2021, the technology has incorporated firefighter feedback and amassed anonymized technical data to improve the solution end-to-end.

“Pyrrha is another example of the power of open source to accelerate technology innovation that can save lives,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and GM of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We are happy to support and host the development of Pyrrha and the community that is building and using it.”

“On behalf of the Prometeo team, we want to extend our deepest thanks to our many partners who have contributed to improve this solution and help protect firefighters,” said Salome Valero, co-founder of Prometeo. “We set out to create technology that would equip firefighters with personalized monitoring of their exposure to toxic substances. Through the contributions of our partners and the open source community, that dream is becoming a reality through the Pyrrha open source project.”

In addition to the Linux Foundation, IBM and Samsung, Prometeo’s ecosystem partners in the Pyrrha community include a variety of leading tech companies and institutions:

Arrow Electronics has helped improve Prometeo’s IoT devices.GRAF/Bombers de la Generalitat de Catalunya facilitated multiple rounds of field testing of  testing with Prometeo’s technology during controlled burns in Spain. The Pau Costa Foundation is helping connect Prometeo with a global community of firefighters, and exploring opportunities for further field testing.Peli has contributed their expertise in creating firefighter gear to help enhance Prometeo’s hardware.Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona has contributed lab access and technical expertise to help calibrate devices.

IBM and The Linux Foundation have a rich history of deploying projects that help drive progress in society through innovation. The winner of the 2018 Call for Code Global Challenge, Project OWL, contributed its IoT device firmware in March 2020 as the ClusterDuck Protocol. Since then, more than a dozen Call for Code deployment projects have been open sourced for communities that need them most, with solutions ranging from disaster-response, to mitigating climate change, and promoting racial justice.

The Pyrrha project community encourages new users to contribute and to deploy the software in new environments around the world. Priorities for short term updates include adapting the hardware for usage in new locations, improving the analysis of toxin exposure  over time, and further improving the mobile and smartphone capabilities. For more information, please visit: ​https://pyrrha-platform.org.

The 2021 Call for Code Global Challenge invites the world’s software developers and innovators to combat climate change with open source-powered technology. Call for Code’s diverse and like-minded global ecosystem of experts, companies, foundations, universities, and celebrities continues to expand. It includes UN World Food Programme Innovation Accelerator experts, Arrow Electronics, Black Girls Code, Caribbean Girls Hack, charity: water, Clinton Foundation, Clinton Global Initiative University, Heifer International, Ingram Micro, Intuit, Kode With Klossy, NearForm, United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, United Way, and World Institute on Disability.

For more information and to begin contributing, please visit: https://developer.ibm.com/callforcode/solutions/projects/get-started/ & https://github.com/Pyrrha-Platform

About Call for Code 
Developers have revolutionized the way people live and interact with virtually everyone and everything. Where most people see challenges, developers see possibilities. That’s why David Clark, the CEO of David Clark Cause, created Call for Code in 2018, and launched it alongside Founding Partner IBM and Charitable Partner UN Human Rights. Since then, Call for Code has scaled to include an annual University Challenge in addition to regional prizes and the creation of Call for Code for Racial Justice. This multi-year global initiative is a rallying cry to developers to use their mastery of the latest technologies to drive positive and long-lasting change across the world through code. Call for Code Global Challenge winning solutions are further developed, incubated, and deployed as sustainable open source projects to ensure they can drive positive change. To learn more about past winners and their progress, visit IBM Developer.

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. The Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Jennifer Cloer
for the Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

The post The Linux Foundation, Prometeo, IBM, and Partners Announce New Firefighter Safety Open Source Project appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post The Linux Foundation, Prometeo, IBM, and Partners Announce New Firefighter Safety Open Source Project appeared first on Linux.com.

Interested in a Cloud Computing Career? This Roadmap Can Point the Way

Tuesday 27th of July 2021 09:00:43 PM

Like many people, you might be thinking about a career in the fast growing field of cloud computing. It’s a smart move, with the Open Source Jobs Report finding that possessing cloud computing skills has the biggest impact on hiring decisions amongst technical hiring managers surveyed. And recent data have shown that job openings for cloud computing professionals have skyrocketed the last few years. 

The problem for most is determining how and where to start. If you are new to the IT sector, jumping straight into cloud and cloud native technologies is nearly impossible without first gaining an understanding of the infrastructure technologies on which the cloud is built. That’s why we’ve developed the roadmap below, outlining the knowledge and skills needed to successfully pursue a cloud career.

To start, you need to understand Linux. Over 90% of public cloud instances are running on Linux, and if you aren’t proficient in the Linux command line interface, you won’t get very far working in the cloud. You also need to understand DevOps – a term referring to the combination of development and operations which traditionally were separate in the IT space. The vast majority of organizations today use DevOps practices to deploy to the cloud, so you need to understand those practices. 

Once you’ve learned the fundamentals underpinning the cloud, you can start to learn the cloud technologies themselves. 91% of organizations running in the cloud are using Kubernetes, so it’s an ideal technology to focus on. 

To get your feet wet, you can start with some of our free courses:

Introduction to Linux
Introduction to DevOps and Site Reliability Engineering
Introduction to Cloud Infrastructure Technologies
Introduction to Kubernetes

After that, consider our Cloud Engineer Bootcamp if you want a more structured learning program, or check out our full array of cloud training and certification offerings

And don’t forget to view the Cloud Career Roadmap below for more insights!

Download full size version

The post Interested in a Cloud Computing Career? This Roadmap Can Point the Way appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post Interested in a Cloud Computing Career? This Roadmap Can Point the Way appeared first on Linux.com.

What’s a TAM and why might you want to be one?

Tuesday 27th of July 2021 05:49:53 AM

The technical account manager (TAM) is a key customer service role in the enterprise. Here’s everything you need to know.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post What’s a TAM and why might you want to be one? appeared first on Linux.com.

Measuring the Health of Open Source Communities

Monday 26th of July 2021 03:03:43 PM

Abstract: Tracking different types of metrics is essential for free and open source communities. Metrics give project insights into specific efforts and help get a feel of the community’s general perception. For that, tools that can pull data from various sources and develop a visualization of this data will help projects make informed decisions.

If you manage or want to be part of an open source project, you might have wondered if the project is healthy or not and how to measure key performance indicators relating to project health. 

You could choose to analyze different aspects of the project, such as the technical health (such as number of forks on GitHub, number of contributors over time, and number of bugs reported over time), the financial health (such as the donations and revenues over time), the social aspects (such as social media mentions, post shares, and sentiment analysis across social media channels), and diversity and inclusion aspects (such as having a code of conduct, create event inclusion activities, color-blind-accessible materials in presentations, and project front-end designs). 

The question is, how do you measure such aspects? To determine if a project’s overall health, metrics should be computed and analyzed over time. It’s helpful to have such metrics in a dashboard to facilitate analysis and decision-making.

Why do metrics matter?

“The goal here is not to construct an enormous vacuum cleaner to suck every tiny detail of your community into a graph. The goal is instead to identify what we don’t know about our community and to use measurements as a means to understand those things better.”

The Art of Community – Jono Bacon

Open source software needs community. By knowing more about the community through different metrics, stakeholders can make informed decisions. For example, developers can select the best project to join, maintainers can decide which governance measures are effective, end-users can select the healthier project that will live longer (and prosper), and investors can select the best project to invest in [1]. 

Furthermore, Open Source Program Offices (OSPO), i.e., offices inside companies that aim to manage the open source ecosystems that the company depends on [5], can assess the project’s health and sustainability by analyzing different metrics. OSPO is becoming very popular because around 90% of the components of modern applications are open source [6]. Thus, measuring the risks of consuming, contributing to, and releasing open source software is very important to OSPO [5].

How do we define which metrics to evaluate?
  • Set your goals: Measuring without a goal is just pointless. Goals are concrete targets to know what the community wants to achieve [3].
  • Find reliable statistical sources: After defining your goals, you can then identify the source to help you achieve your goals. It is essential to find ways to get statistics on the most important goals [4]. Some statistics are apparent, such as on GitHub, you can collect the number of stars, number of forks, and number of contributors to a repository. It is also possible to get mailing lists subscribers and the project website visits. Some statistics are not so obvious, though, and you might need tools to help extract such numbers.
  • Interpret the statistics: Interpret the statistics regarding the “4 P’s”: People, Project, Process, and Partners [4]. 
    • Look at the numbers mostly related to the People in the community, such as contributors’ productivity, which channels have the most impact, etc. 
    • Then, look at the velocity and maturity of your Project, such as the number of PRs, and the number of issues. 
    • After that, look at the maturity of your Process, i.e., what’s your review process? How long does it take to solve an issue? 
    • Finally, look at the ecosystem view regarding your Partnersthat is, statistics on project dependencies and projects that depend on you.
  • Use dashboards to evaluate your metrics: Many existing tools help to create dashboards to analyze and measure open source community healthiness, such as LFX Insights, Bitergia, and GrimoireLab.
  • Make changes: After measuring, it is necessary to make changes based on those measurements.
Learning from examples

Different projects use different strategies to measure the project’s health. 

The CHAOSS Community creates analytics and metrics to help understand project health. They have many working groups, each one focusing on a specific kind of metric. For example,

  • The Diversity and Inclusion working group focuses on the diversity and inclusion in events, how diverse and inclusive the governance of a community is, and how healthy the community leadership is. 
  • The Evolution working group creates metrics for analyzing the type and frequency of activities involved in software development, improving the project quality, and community growth. 
  • The Value working group creates metrics for identifying the degree to which a project improves people’s lives beyond the software project, the degree to which the project is valuable to a user or contributor, and the degree to which the project is monetarily valuable from an organization point of view. 
  • The Risk working group creates metrics to understand the quality of a specific software package, potential intellectual property issues, and understand how transparent a given software package is concerning licenses, dependencies, etc.

The Mozilla project collaborated with Bitergia and Analyse & Tal to build an interactive network visualization of Mozilla’s contributor communities. By visualizing different metrics, they were able to find that Mozilla has not only one community but many communities concerning other areas of contributions, motivations, engagement levels, etc. Based on that, they built a report to visualize how these different communities are interconnected.

LFX Insights

Many projects such as Kubernetes and TARS use the LFX Insights tool to analyze their community. 

The LFX Insights dashboard helps project communities evaluate different metrics concerning open source development to grow a sustainable open source ecosystem. The tool has distinct features to support various stakeholders [2], such as

  • Maintainers and project leads can get a multi-dimensional reporting of the project, avoid maintainer burnout, ensure the project’s health, security, and sustainability.
  • Project marketers and community evangelists can use the metrics to attract new members, engage the community, and identify opportunities to increase awareness.
  • Members and corporate sponsors can know which community and software to engage in, communicate the impact within the community, and evaluate their employees’ open source contributions.
  • Open source developers can know where to focus their efforts, showcase their leadership and expertise, manage affiliations and their impact.

The source code repository includes the number of commits in total and by contributor, the number of contributors, the top contributors by commits, and the companies that mainly contribute to the project. Users can extract Pull requests (PRs) from many tools such as Gerrit and GitHub. Furthermore, users, maintainers, and contributors to Linux Foundation projects, such as TARS, can extract various metrics from LFX Insights. 

Similarly to commits, the number of PRs in total, by contributor, and by company. The tool also calculates the average time to review the PR and the PRs that are still to be merged. You can also extract metrics for issues and continuous integration tools. Besides that, LFX Insights allows projects to collect communication and collaboration information from different communication channels such as mailing lists, Slack, and Twitter.

Projects might have different goals when using LFX Insights. The TARS project, part of the TARS Foundation, uses the LFX Insights tool to have a big picture of each sub-project (such as TARSFramework, TARSGo, etc.). Through the dashboards created by the LFX Insights tool, the TARS community can know the statistics of each project and the community as a whole (see Figure 1 and 2).

Using LFX Insights tools, the TARS community analyzes how many people contribute to each project and which organizations contribute to TARS. Additionally, they extract the number of commits and lines of code contributed by each contributor. The TARS community believes that by analyzing such metrics, they can attract and retain more contributors.

About the authors: 

Isabella Ferreira is an Ambassador at the TARS Foundation, a cloud-native open-source microservice foundation under the Linux Foundation.

Mark Shan is the Chair at Tencent Open Source Alliance and also Board Chair of the TARS Foundation Governing Board. 

REFERENCES

[1] Jansen, Slinger. “Measuring the health of open source software ecosystems: Beyond the scope of project health.” Information and Software Technology 56.11 (2014): 1508-1519.

[2] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwTOrDg3LsI

[3] https://opensource.com/bus/16/8/measuring-community-health

[4] https://dzone.com/articles/-measuring-metrics-in-open-source-projects

[5] https://opensource.com/article/20/5/open-source-program-office

[6] https://fossa.com/blog/building-open-source-program-office-ospo/

The post Measuring the Health of Open Source Communities appeared first on Linux.com.

Seven (more) things I wish I’d known before becoming a sysadmin

Friday 23rd of July 2021 10:39:43 PM

These seven things are given to you on a need-to-know basis, and you need to know.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Seven (more) things I wish I’d known before becoming a sysadmin appeared first on Linux.com.

The Linux Foundation Announces Conference Schedule for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021

Thursday 22nd of July 2021 10:59:03 PM

Premier open source event covering the most critical and innovative open source topics gathers developers and technologists both in-person and virtually this September.

SAN FRANCISCO, July 22, 2021 —  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the full schedule for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021, the leading conference for open source developers, technologists, and community leaders. The events are taking place September 27-30 in Seattle, Washington and are co-located with OSPOCon and Linux Security Summit, among others. The schedule can be viewed here and the keynote speakers can be viewed here.

OSS + ELC 2021 will feature a robust program of 250+ talks (keynote presentations, conference sessions, tutorials, and BoFs) covering the most essential and cutting edge topics touching open source today: Linux Systems, Dependability, AI & Data, DEI, Community Leadership, IoT, Cloud Infrastructure, Cloud Native Development, Databases, and of course, Embedded Linux. Plus the co-located OSPOCon, also announcing its conference agenda today, covers critical topics affecting open source program management offices. The events are being produced in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual participation available.

“These events cover the pivotal technologies at the core of software and hardware today, and shine a magnifying glass on innovation driving the change of tomorrow. This breadth of coverage, along with an audience ranging from students to kernel developers, is what makes this event a cornerstone gathering and learning place for the open source community,” says Angela Brown, SVP & General Manager of Events at The Linux Foundation. “We are so excited to gather in person with everyone again, and look forward to kicking off our fall schedule of in-person events in Seattle and engaging the community with wide ranging learning opportunities.”

Conference Session Highlights from Open Source Summit:

Wayfair Same-day Delivery: A Narrative in Painful Anecdotes about CI at Scale – Lelia Bray-Musso & Gary Preston White Jr., Wayfair EVE: A Secure API for the Edge that Delights App Developers – Kathy Giori, ZEDEDA Inc.A Rolling Stable Kernel Model – Sasha Levin, GoogleFunctional Safety Basics for Open Source Software Developers – Nicole Pappler & Prof. Dr. Andreas Bärwald, AlektoMetisSelf-serve Feature Engineering Platform Using Flyte and Feast – Ketan Umare, Union.ai

From Embedded Linux Conference:

OP-TEE: When Linux Loses Control – Clément Léger, BootlinFrom an Idea to a Patch in the Linux Mainline – Marta Rybczynska, SyslinbitYocto Continuous Integration in a Kube – Joshua Watt, Garmin

And from OSPOCon:

Ensuring OSS License Compliance the Easy Way – Tony Aiuto, GoogleEverything We’ve Learned from Three Years of Funding Open Source – Duane O’Brien, IndeedMVG – Minimum Viable Governance for Your Organization’s Open Collaboration Needs – Ashley Wolf & Justin Colannino, GitHub

Registration (in-person) is offered at the early price of US$850 through July 27. Academic, Student and Hobbyist Passes are available for US$275. Registration to attend virtually is US$50. 

Members of The Linux Foundation receive a 20 percent discount off registration and can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. 

Diversity & Need-Based Scholarships and Travel Funding
Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. We place an emphasis on funding applicants who are from historically underrepresented or untapped groups and/or those of lower socioeconomic status. To learn more and apply, click here.

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Sponsor
Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 is made possible thanks to our sponsors, including Diamond Sponsors: Google, IBM, Microsoft and Red Hat, Platinum Sponsors: Huawei, Snyk, and SUSE, and Gold Sponsors: Cloud Native Computing Foundation, SODA Foundation, Styra, WhiteSource and Witekio. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team.

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

###

Media Contact

Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post The Linux Foundation Announces Conference Schedule for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post The Linux Foundation Announces Conference Schedule for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 appeared first on Linux.com.

Women Who Code and Linux Foundation Launch Open Source Scholarship

Thursday 22nd of July 2021 09:00:24 PM

Linux Foundation Training & Certification is thrilled to announce that we are partnering with Women Who Code (WWCode), an international community dedicated to inspiring women to succeed in technology, to provide scholarships to promising women to help them get started working with open source software. 

WWCode will award 50 scholarships per quarter to deserving women, with Linux Foundation Training & Certification providing each of these recipients with a voucher to register for any Linux Foundation eLearning course and certification exam at no charge, such as the Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate, Certified Kubernetes Administrator, Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator and more. 

All Linux Foundation certification exams are conducted online with a proctor monitoring virtually via webcam and screen sharing. Scholarship recipients will have one year to sit for their exam, and should they fail to pass on the first attempt, one retake will be provided. Upon passing a certification exam, they will receive a PDF certificate and a digital badge which can be displayed on digital resumes and social media profiles, and which can be independently verified by potential employers. 

“Open source technology is leading so much digital transformation today, from cloud computing to networking, web development, blockchain and more, yet there is a continual shortage of qualified talent generally, and fewer women pursuing these roles specifically,” said Linux Foundation SVP & GM of Training & Certification Clyde Seepersad. “At the same time, despite so much opportunity, barriers to entry and simply figuring out where to start can be daunting. We hope that this program makes it easier for many women to launch successful open source careers, and go on to inspire the next generation of developers, DevOps engineers, cloud architects and more.”

“Continuous learning is one of the cornerstones of tech industry leadership and success for diverse women,” said WWCode CEO Alaina Percival. “We are proud to be partnering with The Linux Foundation to provide these invaluable scholarship opportunities to our global community.”

Those interested in applying for a Women Who Code/Linux Foundation scholarship can do so here.

About Women Who Code

Women Who Code (WWCode) is an international nonprofit dedicated to inspiring women to excel in technology careers. WWCode is building a world where women are proportionally representative as technical leaders, executives, founders, VCs, board members, and software engineers. The organization has executed more than 14,000 free events around the world, garnered a membership exceeding 290,000 in 134 countries. Help empower even more women to advance in tech with the training and community they need to succeed by supporting WWCode. Learn more at womenwhocode.com.

The post Women Who Code and Linux Foundation Launch Open Source Scholarship appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post Women Who Code and Linux Foundation Launch Open Source Scholarship appeared first on Linux.com.

Chris Aniszczyk Talks About The Open 3D Foundation

Thursday 22nd of July 2021 06:55:51 PM

The Linux Foundation recently announced a new foundation called the Open 3D Foundation for multi-platform 3D gaming technologies. Amazon’s Lumberyard has become the anchor project for the foundation, leading to creating the ‘first’ purely community-driven gaming engine. However, AAA games are not the only consumer of 3D gaming technologies; they have a wider usage in many other industries, including film production, automotive, healthcare, and so on. Under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation, O3DF will be able to bring different players from different industries and verticals to collaborate on technologies that have so far remained solely proprietary and dominated by a few companies. It’s going to commoditize and democratize gaming technologies, enabling many more players to build great services and products based on these technologies. In this interview, we sat down with Chris Aniszczyk, CTO, CNCF & VP of Developer Relations, The Linux Foundation to discuss the new foundation.

The post Chris Aniszczyk Talks About The Open 3D Foundation appeared first on Linux.com.

Happy SysAdmin Day! Save $100 on All Products – Plus a Free Gift

Tuesday 20th of July 2021 09:00:18 PM

We love our SysAdmins at The Linux Foundation! You are the ones who keep so much of the technology we rely on running smoothly so we can all do our jobs. That’s why we want to recognize you with a special offer ahead of SysAdmin Day on July 30.

From now through July 30, 2021, everyone can save $100 on any of our products, simply by using code SYSADMIN100 at checkout. That means you can get the training or certification you’ve been considering at a significant discount, helping to improve your skills and credentials with products like:

Essentials of Linux System Administration (LFS201)
Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS)
Linux Networking & Administration (LFS211)
Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE)

With the most recent Open Source Jobs Report finding 93% of hiring managers are having difficulty finding enough open source talent, and 57% prioritizing hiring of certified professionals, this is a great time to learn a new skill. If you aren’t sure what to pursue, that’s ok! Check out our Plan Your Training page to view learning paths, or take our Career Path Quiz to figure out which area of technology best fits your interests and personality.

If you already know what you want to study, head straight to our product catalog and get started!

The post Happy SysAdmin Day! Save $100 on All Products – Plus a Free Gift appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post Happy SysAdmin Day! Save $100 on All Products – Plus a Free Gift appeared first on Linux.com.

The 5 things I wish I’d known before becoming a sysadmin

Monday 19th of July 2021 11:00:58 PM

Being an IT professional, you know that information is important. Here are five bits of information I wish I’d known before signing on the dotted line as a sysadmin.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post The 5 things I wish I’d known before becoming a sysadmin appeared first on Linux.com.

The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021

Friday 16th of July 2021 06:57:08 AM

Premier event for open source developers and community will feature visionaries sharing insights on Machine Learning, Security, Linux, Gaming, Cloud, the Mars Ingenuity Mission and more.

SAN FRANCISCO, July 15, 2021The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021, taking place September 27-30 in Seattle, Washington. The events are being produced in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual participation available, and are co-located with OSPOCon and Linux Security Summit, among others.

Open Source Summit (OSS) is the leading conference for developers, architects and other technologists – as well as open source community and industry leaders – to collaborate, share information, learn about the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions. Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is the leading, vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded and industrial IoT products. Over 4,000 are expected to participate in the event. 

Keynote speakers include:

Anima Anandkumar, Bren Professor of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) & Director, Machine Learning Research, NVIDIA, sharing on machine learning.

Tim Canham, Software and Operations Lead for the Mars Helicopter, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, discussing the use of Linux in the Mars Ingenuity mission.

Hilary Carter, Vice President of Research, and Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation, sharing insights on new initiatives at The Linux Foundation for the open source community.

Chris DiBona, Director of Open Source & Making and Science, Google

Heather E. McGowan, Future of Work Strategist, speaking on the future of work and the human capital era.

Todd Moore, Vice President – Open Technology and Developer Advocacy & Chief Technology Officer, DEG, IBM

Royal O’Brien, Game Tech Chief Evangelist, Amazon, speaking on the new Open 3D Engine Foundation.

Sanath Kumar Ramesh, Founder & Chief Executive Officer, OpenTreatments Foundation, sharing on OpenTreatment’s life-altering
initiative.

Brent Schroeder, Head of Office of CTO, Americas Chief Technology Officer, SUSE

Window Snyder, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Thistle Technologies, discussing IoT security.

Kate Stewart, Vice President of Dependable Embedded Systems and Dr. David A. Wheeler, Director of Open Source Supply Chain Security, The Linux Foundation, speaking on supply chain security.

Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux & Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, Vice President & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware, discussing 30 years of Linux.

Chris Wright, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Red Hat

The full schedule of sessions will be announced on July 22, with additional keynotes also being announced in the coming weeks. 

Registration (in-person) is offered at the early price of $850 through July 27. Registration to attend virtually is $50. Members of The Linux Foundation receive a 20 percent discount off registration and can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted. For information on eligibility and how to apply, please click here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. To learn more and apply, please click here.

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Sponsor
Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 is made possible thanks to our sponsors, including Diamond Sponsors: Google, IBM, Microsoft and Red Hat, Platinum Sponsors: Huawei, Snyk, and SUSE, and Gold Sponsors: SODA Foundation, Styra, WhiteSource and Witekio. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team.

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

###

Media Contact
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 appeared first on Linux.com.

Understanding US Export Controls and Open Source Projects (2021 Update)

Friday 16th of July 2021 04:39:37 AM

One of the greatest strengths of open source development is how it enables collaboration across the entire world. However, because open source development is a global activity, it necessarily involves making available software across national boundaries. Some countries’ export control regulations, such as the United States, may require taking additional steps to ensure that an open source project is satisfying obligations under local laws.

In July of 2020, The Linux Foundation published a whitepaper on how to address these issues in detail, which can be downloaded here. In 2021, the primary update in the paper is to reflect a change in the US Export Administration Regulations.

Previously, in order for publicly available encryption software under ECCN 5D002 to be not subject to the EAR, email notifications were required regardless of whether or not the cryptography it implemented was standardized.Following the change, email notifications are only required for software that implements “non-standard cryptography”.

Please see the updated paper and the EAR for more specific details about this change.

The post Understanding US Export Controls and Open Source Projects (2021 Update) appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Understanding US Export Controls and Open Source Projects (2021 Update) appeared first on Linux.com.

Understanding US export controls with open source projects (2021)

Friday 16th of July 2021 04:19:45 AM

One of the greatest strengths of open source development is how it enables collaboration across the entire world. However, because open source development is a global activity, it necessarily involves making available software across national boundaries. Some countries’ export control regulations, such as the United States, may require taking additional steps to ensure that an open source project is satisfying obligations under local laws.

In July of 2020, The Linux Foundation published a whitepaper on how to address these issues in detail, which can be downloaded here. In 2021, the primary update in the paper is to reflect a change in the US Export Administration Regulations.

Previously, in order for publicly available encryption software under ECCN 5D002 to be not subject to the EAR, email notifications were required regardless of whether or not the cryptography it implemented was standardized.Following the change, email notifications are only required for software that implements “non-standard cryptography”.

Please see the updated paper and the EAR for more specific details about this change.

The post Understanding US export controls with open source projects (2021) appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Understanding US export controls with open source projects (2021) appeared first on Linux.com.

Linux Foundation Launches 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey

Thursday 15th of July 2021 11:34:06 PM
Linux Foundation Launches 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey

In partnership with AWS, CHAOSS, Comcast, Fujitsu, GitHub, GitLab, Hitachi, Huawei, Intel, NEC, Panasonic, Renesas, Panasonic, RedHat, VMware

Linux Foundation Research and its partners are assessing the state of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) within open source communities. The purpose of this research is to understand the demographics and dynamics concerning overall contributor participation and to identify gaps to be addressed as a means to advancing inclusive cultures within these environments.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion are core values of the Linux Foundation, and we are constantly looking for ways to improve our communities for the benefit of their contributors. Our initiatives include DEI efforts across our global events, training, and open source member programs. For example, we founded the Inclusive Naming Initiative (November 2020) with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, and we began awarding training scholarships with TransTech (Spring 2021) for qualified LGBTQ individuals.

This research aims to drive data-driven decisions on future programming and interventions to benefit the people who use and develop open source technologies. The survey results will enable greater understanding of the people who use and develop open source technologies within the Linux Foundation and its partner communities.

To take the survey in Russian, Chinese (simplified), Japanese, Korean, Hindi, Arabic, German, French, Spanish, or Portuguese (Br), click on the upper right-hand corner on the survey landing page.

Participate in the Survey (15 Minutes)

Open source software is created by people of vastly different backgrounds, nationalities, orientations, and identities — all of whose opinions must be respected, included, and recognized. As the leader in running the world’s most important open source communities, it is incumbent upon us to elevate those opinions and concerns regarding important DEI issues with quantifiable data.

Jim Zemlin
Executive Director, Linux Foundation

We are pleased to have the support of several members of the LF community in this research. Hear from those supporters who have offered comments:

In today’s digital world, open source software powers nearly all of our modern society and economy. Understanding the people who build, maintain, and use these projects is important to anyone concerned about the sustainability of open source and the critical network of services and technologies that depend on it. As the home to over 65 million developers, we are proud to join The Linux Foundation in the 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey.

Demetris CheathamSr. Director, Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Strategy, GitHub

Building an environment where everyone feels a sense of belonging is not just the right thing to do; it’s also good for business. Our Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging (DIB) values have been fundamental to GitLab’s success, in which we collaborate alongside our open source community to build a product that best represents our estimated 30 million users. When thinking about a DIB strategy, plan, or philosophy, you have to consider all the things you can’t see, and you don’t hear. For that reason, we have joined the Linux Foundation to launch the 2021 Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey, and we look forward to hearing the voices of the wider open source community. Together, we’ll uncover insights that we hope will lead to a lasting impact across the entire open source ecosystem.

Candace WilliamsManager, Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging, GitLab

Creating an open and inclusive community for all people is a great mission to have, and underpinning this is data on where we are and what is needed to achieve the mission.  I am proud to support this groundbreaking work being done by the Linux Foundation to get a baseline of where we are in including all people in our open source communities and keeping this data and questions open and ensuring people’s privacy.

Nithya A. RuffHead, Comcast Open Source Program Office, Comcast

CHAOSS was honored to be a core contributor to the creation of this survey, and watching it evolve as part of a collaboration of a diverse and experienced team was an amazing process. We fully support this initiative, as the results of this survey will be crucial for many of us working to help others improve the health of their open source projects.

Elizabeth BarronCommunity Manager, CHAOSS

Open Source has become critically fundamental for today’s ICT infrastructure. Its sustainability relies on the developers and users, many of whom have very diverse backgrounds and opinions. The LF Research DEI Survey will provide key insights into these different aspects of our open source communities. As one of the active open source users and contributors, Huawei is happy to support this research and hopes this will help open source, the greatest collaborative development in human history, to achieve a more bright and sustainable future.

Peixin HouChief Open Source Expert, Huawei

Our best is achieved when work environments are as supportive, inclusive, and diverse as they are innovative. Through new insights about both the people who are the open source community, and their work cultures, we can understand shortcomings and work toward that vision. Intel is proud to support the Linux Foundation’s diversity, equity, and inclusion research as part of its broad commitment to creating innovative environments through diverse teams.

Melissa E. EversVice President, Architecture, Graphics and Software, Software and Ecosystem Strategy, Intel

Open and inclusive communities and ecosystems are at the heart of innovation for Red Hat. Diversity and equity are key to organizational health, and we’re hopeful this important research will increase awareness and opportunities for underrepresented groups, introduce new perspectives and ideas, and inform plans to create more welcoming communities.

Deborah BryantSenior Director, OPSO, Office of the CTO, Red Hat

Renesas fully supports the Linux Foundation’s effort to better understand open source community participation and desire to make the community more inclusive for users and contributors. We consider Diversity and Inclusion as part of our core values and applaud the Linux Foundation for striving to advance a culture of inclusion across the open source ecosystem.

Hisao MunakataSenior Director, Renesas

VMware sees it as critical that we create a digital future that is equitable, accessible, and inclusive for all. We are proud to align ourselves with open source communities like the Linux Foundation and do our part to help build a culture of inclusion across the tech industry. Together, we can enable everyone, regardless of background, to succeed and further innovation.

Shanis WindlandVice President of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, VMware PreviousNext

Participate in the Survey (15 Minutes)

Survey Details

This survey will take 15 minutes or less. It will be used to create an anonymized data set, with non-sensitive portions made freely available where feasible to do so and will avoid re-identification of respondents.

Anyone who uses, contributes to, or thinks about open source software is welcome to participate in the survey. Whether you’re a long-time maintainer, a new contributor, or if you are an open source-curious person, we want to hear from you!

Bonus

As a thank-you for your participation, you will receive a 20% registration discount to attend the Open Source Summit/Embedded Linux Conference event upon completion of the survey. Please note this discount is not transferable and may not be combined with other offers.

Privacy

All questions are optional. The data collected here is anonymous and will not be linked to any other data sources. Please do not include any details that could reasonably identify you or any other person in text responses. We aim not to collect any personally identifying information, and the privacy and confidentiality of all respondents will be maintained; please see https://www.linuxfoundation.org/resources/publications/useaccess/ for more information about the Use and Access Policy for the responses to this survey. This survey uses cookies, but only to prevent duplicate responses. 

References

Questions used in this survey draw from the work of:

Open Demographics Documentation
Diversity in Tech
The CHAOSS Project
GitHub 2017 Open Source Survey

The questions in this survey are made available and may be reused under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike 4.0 International (CC-BY-SA-4.0). The CC-BY-SA-4.0 license is available at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/.

Thank You

Linux Foundation Research and our partners are grateful for the contributions of a dedicated group of individuals, all of whom have contributed their time and talents toward the development of this survey.

Questions

If you have questions regarding this survey, please email us at research@linuxfoundation.org.

The post Linux Foundation Launches 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Linux Foundation Launches 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey appeared first on Linux.com.

Linux GECOS information demystified

Thursday 15th of July 2021 11:07:10 PM

If you ever wanted to know what GECOS is and why it’s important to you, here are the answers
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Linux GECOS information demystified appeared first on Linux.com.

How LFCA Compares to Legacy Entry-Level IT Certifications

Wednesday 14th of July 2021 09:00:30 PM

When we developed the Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate (LFCA) exam, we wanted to create a certification that would help folks get started in an IT career by demonstrating to employers they possess knowledge of the most important and widely used modern infrastructure technologies. Our goal was to make an IT career more accessible, and also close the skills gap that is making it difficult for employers to find enough talented candidates.

Part of this process involved looking at the existing marketplace for entry-level IT certifications, and seeing where they were lacking. For instance, the 2020 Open Source Jobs Report from The Linux Foundation and edX found that knowledge of cloud computing has the biggest impact on hiring decisions amongst employers; but legacy entry-level IT certifications do not test for cloud computing knowledge. 

The new chart below compares the LFCA exam to a typical legacy entry-level IT certification to outline the differences, and highlight why LFCA is becoming the certification of choice for employers who want to hire new talent with the knowledge necessary to get straight to work administering modern IT infrastructure. We encourage you to check it out, and also our IT career roadmap which explores some of the career paths that the LFCA can open. 

And remember to celebrate 30 years of Linux in 2021, the LFCA exam is discounted 30% through December 31 if you use code LINUX30 at checkout!

Download Full Version

The post How LFCA Compares to Legacy Entry-Level IT Certifications appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post How LFCA Compares to Legacy Entry-Level IT Certifications appeared first on Linux.com.

What’s the average age of a Linux sysadmin?

Wednesday 14th of July 2021 08:30:21 PM

This poll attempts to answer a question posed by one of our community members
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post What’s the average age of a Linux sysadmin? appeared first on Linux.com.

More in Tux Machines

You Can Use Raspberry Pi 400 As a PC Keyboard and Mouse Combo

If you’re a fan of Pimoroni, you’re probably familiar with its software lead Phil Howard (aka Gadgetoid) and his developments in the Raspberry Pi community. Today we’re sharing an awesome project he put together using our favorite keyboard PC, the Raspberry Pi 400. Using the right cable and a bit of code, the Raspberry Pi 400 can function as a regular, USB HID keyboard. The best Raspberry Pi projects are easy to recreate and the only accessory you need to pull this project off is a USB Type-C to USB Type-A cable. Read more

today's leftovers

  • DearPyGui 1.0.0 user interface Toolkit Released - itsfoss.net

    Published edition Dear PyGui 1.0.0 (the DPG), a cross-platform toolkit for GUI development in Python. The most important feature of the project is the use of multithreading and outsourcing of operations to the GPU to speed up rendering. The key goal of shaping the 1.0.0 release is to stabilize the API. Compatibility-breaking changes will now be proposed in a separate “experimental” module. To ensure high performance, the bulk of the DearPyGui code is written in C ++ using the Dear ImGui library , designed for creating graphical applications in C ++ and offering a fundamentally different operating model. The Dear PyGui source code is licensed under the MIT license. Declared support for Linux, Windows 10 and macOS platforms.

  • Software testing - a 32-year-old message

    And then, after having tested hundreds of Linux distributions, thousands of applications, every release of Windows since 3.11, and then some, I can definitely say that the slow, steady erosion of professional testing in the software world is noticeable. And by that mean, in those scenarios it actually existed, because in some domains, it's never been there, and it shows. If anything, the longer I keep my hands on this or that application or program, the more I'm convinced that the new, casual approach to quality is simply not working. There will be a moment of reckoning.

  • Issue #373 - Robotic tickles

    We thought we’d lead with the weirdest Raspberry Pi-powered thing, purely because we couldn’t resist the bizarre visual. These robotic hands move according to actions taken on social media. And they’re creepy. We like creepy. Another robot from the blog this week can solve your Sudoku in seconds, and a hackathon-winning student project can photograph any object and automatically turn it into an NFT.

  • ODROID-H2+ SBC discontinued due to supply shortage - CNX Software

    Hardkernel has just discontinued ODROID-H2+ single board computer based on the Intel Celeron J4115 Gemini Lake Refresh processor, which followed ODROID-H2 SBC itself being discontinued shortly after Intel decided to phase out Intel J4105 and other Gemini Lake processors. The reason given is the “uncertain situation of main component supply”, which could mean Celeron J4115 processor is hard to get (or expensive), or the Realtek RTL8125B chipset provides 2.5GbE networking. That means Hardkernel does not offer any x86 SBC at this time. That’s a shame before ODROID-H2+ was a well-supported SBC running Linux or Windows, and great value for money at $119, especially for people interested in the two 2.5 Gbps Ethernet ports found on the board (and upgradeable to six), not to mention support for SO-DIMM memory and M.2 NVMe SSD.

  • Debian blocks VPN and Tor users from reading its Wiki. – BaronHK's Rants

    I understand that they don’t want VPN and Tor users messing up their Wiki anonymously, where it would be difficult to ban any one vandal, but to block people from even _reading it_ unless they unmask themselves is a bit heavy-handed. On Wikipedia, they block Tor and VPN users from editing, but you can read it all you want, and you can view the page’s source code if you are on a VPN. This is the right thing to do. I’m not sure why Debian is requiring us to de-anonymize ourselves just to read their Wiki. I wish that they would stop doing this.

  • Red Hat Announces Updates To Red Hat OpenShift And Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management For Kubernetes
  • How bare metal cloud is powering the telecommunications industry

    Bare metal clouds are gaining a lot of momentum in the telecommunications industry—but why? What is a bare metal cloud, and what are the benefits of using it? In this post, we answer these questions and more.

  • digiKam - digiKam Recipes 21.10.15 released

    It has been a while since the last update of digiKam Recipes. But that doesn’t mean I neglected the book. In the past few months, I’ve been doing a complete language review and adding new material. The new revision of digiKam Recipes features detailed information on how to move digiKam library and databases from one machine to another, how to access digiKam remotely from any machine, and how to import photos from an iOS device. The book now uses the Barlow font for better legibility along with a slightly improved layout.

  • October 2021 Web Server Survey [Ed: Microsoft became so irrelevant in Web servers that it is not even mentioned anymore and most tables don't even list Microsoft (it's miniscule, outside view)]

    In the October 2021 survey we received responses from 1,179,448,021 sites across 265,426,928 unique domains and 11,388,826 web-facing computers. This reflects a loss of 8.59 million sites, but a gain of 1.07 million domains and 20,800 computers. The number of unique domains powered by the nginx web server grew by 789,000 this month, which has increased its total to 79.5 million domains and its leading market share to 29.9%. Conversely, Apache lost 753,000 domains and saw its second-place share fall to 24.7%. Meanwhile, Cloudflare gained 746,000 domains – almost as many as nginx – but it stays in fourth place with an 8.15% share while OpenResty's shrank slightly to 14.5%. Cloudflare also made strong progress amongst the top million websites, where it increased its share by 0.24 percentage points to 18.2%. nginx is in second place with a 22.5% (+0.12pp) share but has closed the gap on Apache which still leads with 24.0% after losing 0.21pp. Apache also continues to lead in terms of active sites, where it has a total of 48.0 million. However, it was the only major vendor to suffer a drop in this metric, with a loss of 277,000 active sites reducing its share down to 23.9% (-0.29pp). In terms of all sites, nginx lost the most (-9.99 million) but remains far in the lead with a total of 412 million.

  • Chrome OS 94 Released - itsfoss.net

    The release of the operating system Chrome OS 94 has been published , based on the Linux kernel, the upstart system manager, the ebuild / portage build toolkit, open components and the Chrome 94 web browser . The user environment of Chrome OS is limited to a web browser, and instead of standard programs, web applications are used, however, Chrome OS includes a full-fledged multi-window interface, desktop and taskbar. Chrome OS 94 is available for most current Chromebooks. Enthusiasts have formed unofficial assemblies for ordinary computers with x86, x86_64 and ARM processors. Source texts are distributed under the free Apache 2.0 license.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (squashfs-tools, tomcat9, and wordpress), Fedora (openssh), openSUSE (kernel, mbedtls, and rpm), Oracle (httpd, kernel, and kernel-container), SUSE (firefox, kernel, and rpm), and Ubuntu (linux-azure, linux-azure-5.4).

  • Apache Releases Security Advisory for Tomcat   | CISA

    The Apache Software Foundation has released a security advisory to address a vulnerability in multiple versions of Tomcat. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to cause a denial of service condition.

  • Security Risks of Client-Side Scanning

    Even before Apple made their announcement, law enforcement shifted their battle for back doors to client-side scanning. The idea is that they wouldn’t touch the cryptography, but instead eavesdrop on communications and systems before encryption or after decryption. It’s not a cryptographic back door, but it still a back door — and brings with it all the insecurities of a back door. I’m part of a group of cryptographers that has just published a paper discussing the security risks of such a system. (It’s substantially the same group that wrote a similar paper about key escrow in 1997, and other “exceptional access” proposals in 2015. We seem to have to do this every decade or so.) In our paper, we examine both the efficacy of such a system and its potential security failures, and conclude that it’s a really bad idea.

  • The Open Source Security Foundation receives $ 10 million in funding - itsfoss.net

    The Linux Foundation has announced a $ 10 million commitment to the OpenSSF (Open Source Security Foundation), an effort to improve the security of open source software. Funds raised through royalties from parent companies of OpenSSF, including Amazon, Cisco, Dell Technologies, Ericsson, Facebook, Fidelity, GitHub, Google, IBM, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Oracle, Red Hat, Snyk, and VMware …

Videos/Shows: Ubuntu 21.10, LHS, and Chris Titus

  • Ubuntu 21.10 - Full Review - Invidious

    Ubuntu 21.10 finally features the GNOME 40 desktop, better Wayland support, and more. In this video, I'll give you my thoughts on "Impish Idri" and we'll go over some of the new features. I'll talk about the installation process, Wayland changes,

  • LHS Episode #435: The Weekender LXXX

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Time to Rice and Make the Best Looking Desktop - Invidious

    We have our script that sets up the system... now we make our script to automatically make our desktop the best looking one out there!