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News For Open Source Professionals
Updated: 3 hours 4 min ago

16 AnsibleFest presentations for sysadmins

Tuesday 31st of August 2021 12:41:18 AM

AnsibleFest offers a lot of information to help sysadmins automate better.

Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post 16 AnsibleFest presentations for sysadmins appeared first on Linux.com.

Happy 30th, Linux!

Wednesday 25th of August 2021 09:00:35 PM

“I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing since april, and is starting to get ready. I’d like any feedback on things people like/dislike in minix, as my OS resembles it somewhat (same physical layout of the file-system (due to practical reasons) among other things).

I’ve currently ported bash(1.08) and gcc(1.40), and things seem to work. This implies that I’ll get something practical within a few months, and I’d like to know what features most people would want. Any suggestions are welcome, but I won’t promise I’ll implement them :-)”

With that note to an online newsgroup 30 years ago today, Linus Torvalds announced what would become arguably the most significant piece of software in history – Linux. Since August 25, 1991, Linux has grown to power all the world’s supercomputers, most mobile devices, financial exchanges, space stations and rovers, and serve as the backbone of the cloud and the internet itself. Companies, organizations, governments and individuals around the world rely on it to conduct business and live their lives every single day.

Our upcoming 2021 Open Source Jobs Report, which will be released in late September, will reveal that demand for Linux talent is as strong as ever, especially as companies rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic. That means now is the perfect time to improve your Linux skills, which is why through the end of 2021 we are offering 30% off select Linux-focused training courses and certification exams in recognition of the 30th anniversary (use code LINUX30 at checkout).

Programs in this offer include:

Certifications:

Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate (LFCA) – Demonstrates knowledge of fundamental IT concepts including operating systems, software application installation and management, hardware installation, use of the command line and basic programming, basic networking functions, security best practices, and other related topics to validate your capability and preparedness for an entry-level IT position.
Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) – Demonstrates you have the ability to design, install, configure, and manage a system installation, and understand key concepts such as networking, storage, security, maintenance, logging and monitoring, application lifecycle, troubleshooting, API object primitives and the ability to establish basic use-cases for end users. The discount is valid for the standalone exam or bundled with the associated training course.
Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) – Demonstrates your ability to deploy and configure the Linux operating system at enterprise scale, and shows you possess all the necessary skills to work as a Linux engineer. The discount is valid for the standalone exam or bundled with the associated training course.

eLearning Courses:

Essentials of Linux System Administration (LFS201) – In this eLearning course, you’ll learn how to administer, configure and upgrade Linux systems running one of the three major Linux distribution families (Red Hat, SUSE, Debian/Ubuntu). You’ll also learn all the tools and concepts you need to efficiently build and manage a production Linux infrastructure. This course also serves as preparation for the LFCS exam.
Linux Networking and Administration (LFS211) – In this eLearning course, you will learn how to design, deploy and maintain a network running under Linux; how to administer the network services; the skills to create and operate a network in any major Linux distribution; how to securely configure the network interfaces; and how to deploy and configure file, web, email and name servers. This course also serves as preparation for the LFCE exam.

To take advantage of this offer, use code LINUX30 at checkout. 

Here’s to 30 more years of Linux innovation!

The post Happy 30th, Linux! appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post Happy 30th, Linux! appeared first on Linux.com.

Set the order of task execution in Ansible with these two keywords

Wednesday 25th of August 2021 06:58:06 PM

Extend Ansible’s flexibility by adding pre_tasks and post_tasks to your playbooks.

Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Set the order of task execution in Ansible with these two keywords appeared first on Linux.com.

How to back up your Linux desktop without rsync

Friday 20th of August 2021 05:10:32 PM

How to back up your Linux desktop without rsync

Restic is a fantastic open source backup application that works smoothly with many cloud and local back-end storage systems.
Anthony Critelli
Fri, 8/20/2021 at 10:10am

Image

Image by Hebi B. from Pixabay

I’ll admit that I’ve always been terrible about backing up my personal computers. I used to be a frequent user of different file sync and sharing platforms before I became a full-time Linux user. While some of these services work with desktop Linux, I always found them clunky to use, and their necessity disappeared once I started using only one computer daily. Moving away from these platforms left many of my files unprotected, and I recently decided to fix that.

Topics:  
Command line utilities  
Linux Administration  
Backups  
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post How to back up your Linux desktop without rsync appeared first on Linux.com.

How I went through burnout and came out stronger

Thursday 19th of August 2021 09:52:28 PM

There are many causes of job burnout. Learning to identify the signals and make changes early is the best way to avoid catastrophic failure.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post How I went through burnout and came out stronger appeared first on Linux.com.

How to handle complex dated and timed tasks in Bash

Thursday 19th of August 2021 08:35:33 PM

Dealing with dates and times can be challenging, but there are plenty of tools to help you in your coding tasks.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post How to handle complex dated and timed tasks in Bash appeared first on Linux.com.

Expanded Keynote Line-Up for Open Networking and Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day Includes Industry Luminaries

Wednesday 18th of August 2021 11:00:00 PM

Four additional keynotes speakers will grace the main stage at Open Networking and Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day to share expertise across Automation and AI, 5G, and the power of Open Ecosystems 

SAN FRANCISCO, August 18, 2021The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-hosts LF Edge, LF Networking, and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), ​​today announced four top keynote speakers for Open Networking and Edge (ONE) Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day, taking place October 11-12 in Los Angeles, Calif. The events will be produced in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual participation available, and are co-located with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America (October 11-15). 

ONE Summit  is the industry’s premier open networking & edge computing event gathering developers, architects and business leaders across enterprises, government, global services providers and cloud for education, inspiration and collaboration. This year, it is joined by Kubernetes on Edge Day which gathers developers and adopters to share their lessons learned in building, breaking, and bettering their edge infrastructure on top of Kubernetes.

“I am especially eager to learn from our newest confirmed keynote speakers, who represent not only the diversity of our community, but the diversity of expertise across the space,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge, and IoT, The Linux Foundation. “Join us either in-person or virtually to learn from some of the best and brightest innovators.”

With an extensive program of 80+ talks, ONE Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day will cover the latest trends across networking & edge across business & technical sessions. Conference tracks include: Enterprise Networking & Edge; Cloud Networking & Edge; Kubernetes on Edge; The New Service Provider (Open Core, Unified Edge & Universal Access); and Business Critical & Innovation.

New Keynote speakers:

Dr. Junlan Feng, Chief Scientist & General Manager, China Mobile Research. Dr. Feng also chairs the LF Networking Governing Board. Her presentation will focus on Network Automation and AIJennifer Kyriakakis, Founder & VP Marketing, MATRIXX Software. Ms. Kyriakakis’ session will focus on Making 5G Real Leveraging Open SourceVanessa Little, Global CTO, Interdynamix (IDX). Ms. Little will speak about Challenges & Innovation in Integration of Open Ecosystem Amy Zwarico, Director – Cybersecurity, Chief Security Office, AT&T. Ms. Zwarico will participate on a keynote panel, “Security across Cloud, Telecom and Edge – in an open world”

Registration

Registration (in-person) is offered at the standard price of US$1125 through September 20. In-Person Academic and Hobbyist Passes are available for US$575 and Student Passes for US$275. Registration to attend virtually is US$50 for all attendee types. Given the current COVID pandemic, all registration funds are fully refundable up until the day before the event.

Members of The Linux Foundation, LF Networking, LF Edge and CNCF receive a 20 percent discount off registration and can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. 

Attendees looking to attend ONE Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day and KubeCon + CloudNativeCon can register for all events through the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon registration form and add their ONE Summit registration at a discounted rate (US$599 for Corporate or US$399 for Individual or Academic).

Health and Safety

In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. Note, in-person registrations are 100 percent refundable until October 10, 2021. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post

Sponsor

Open Networking & Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day is made possible thanks to our sponsors, including Diamond Sponsors: Intel and Juniper Networks, Platinum Sponsors: Huawei, IBM and Zededa, and Gold Sponsor: Cloud Native Computing Foundation. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email  for more information and to speak to the team.

Press & Analysts

Members of the press and analyst communities who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Jill Lovato. 

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact

Jill Lovato

The Linux Foundationjlovato@linuxfoundation.org

The post Expanded Keynote Line-Up for Open Networking and Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day Includes Industry Luminaries appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Expanded Keynote Line-Up for Open Networking and Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day Includes Industry Luminaries appeared first on Linux.com.

The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group Announce the Schedule for OSPOCon Europe 2021, Oct 6

Wednesday 18th of August 2021 09:31:29 PM

OSPOCon, held in North America and Europe this year, is a new event dedicated to creating better, more efficient open source ecosystems, covering the creation and best practices of open source program offices (OSPOs), open source corporate sustainability, and much more.

SAN FRANCISCO, August 18, 2021 —  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-host the TODO Group, an open group of organizations who collaborate on practices, tools and other ways to run successful and effective open source programs and projects, today announced the conference agenda for OSPOCon Europe 2021. The event takes place October 6 in London, England. The schedule can be viewed here

Open Source Program Offices (OSPOs) face many obstacles, such as ensuring high-quality and frequent releases, engaging with developer communities, and contributing back to other projects effectively. OSPOCon events will empower the collaboration of those working to create a center of competency for open source in their organizations through sharing experiences, best practices and tooling. 

OSPOCon Europe session highlights include:

What TODO in the EU: Updates from the TODO Group European Chapter – Leslie Hawthorn, Red Hat & Alexios Zavras, Intel
Innersource: The Key to Your OSPO’s Success – John Mark Walker, Fannie Mae
Exploring OSPOs and Open Methods in Humanitarian Response – Heather Leson, Solferino Academy, & International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies & Peter Masters, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
Good Governance Practices for Healthy Open Source Projects – Dawn Foster, VMware

In addition to OSPOCon Europe, OSPOCon North America is being held September 27-29 in Seattle, Washington alongside Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021. To view the schedule, click here. These events are being produced in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual participation available. To learn more, click here

Registration
Registration is offered at the early price of 140 GBP through August 24. Members of The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group receive a 20 percent discount – members can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code.

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and wear a mask while onsite at the event. Additionally, all attendees will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Academic Registration Scholarships & Travel Funding
Support for Academic Scholarships and Travel Funding is provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and is intended to enable participation in OSPOCon by faculty, staff, students, and/or administrators actively engaged with or interested in learning more about Open Source Program Offices in Academic/Research institutions. To learn more and apply, click here.

Diversity & Need-Based Scholarships and Travel Funding
Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. We place an emphasis on funding applicants who are from historically underrepresented or untapped groups and/or those of lower socioeconomic status. To learn more and apply, click here

Sponsor
For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team. The sponsorship deadline is September 9. 

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group Announce the Schedule for OSPOCon Europe 2021, Oct 6 appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group Announce the Schedule for OSPOCon Europe 2021, Oct 6 appeared first on Linux.com.

Edit sshd_config using a Bash script

Wednesday 18th of August 2021 08:06:52 PM

Using Bash scripts can ensure consistency, security, and proper configuration of SSH and other services.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Edit sshd_config using a Bash script appeared first on Linux.com.

How to create dynamic configuration files using Ansible templates

Wednesday 18th of August 2021 07:12:19 PM

Ansible templates extend your ability to configure applications quickly and easily. This example uses a template to configure Vim.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post How to create dynamic configuration files using Ansible templates appeared first on Linux.com.

Our Back to School Sale is On!

Tuesday 17th of August 2021 09:00:26 PM

It’s that time of year again – school is back in session. This makes it the perfect time to learn a new open source skill, and obtain the certification to demonstrate it. 

Our 2021 Open Source Jobs Report, which will be released in late September, found that demand for certified talent is skyrocketing, with 72% of technical hiring managers surveyed reporting they are more likely to hire a candidate who holds a certification, up from 52% in 2020. 

That is why we are discounting our bundled offerings, which include registration for one of our widely-respected certification exams as well as the related training course. This will give you the skills and knowledge to be successful working with a particular technology while getting you ready to take your exam. During this sale period, you only pay for the exam ($375) but you receive the training course for free. Make sure to select “Buy Bundle” from the product page, and use code FREE21 at checkout to take advantage. 

Options include:

Kubernetes Fundamentals + Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA)
Kubernetes for Developers + Certified Kubernetes Application Developer (CKAD)
Kubernetes Security Essentials + Certified Kubernetes Security Specialist (CKS)
Essentials of Linux System Administration + Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS)
Linux Networking and Administration + Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE)
Hyperledger Fabric Administration + Certified Hyperledger Fabric Administrator (CHFA)
Hyperledger Fabric for Developers + Certified Hyperledger Fabric Developer (CHFD)
Node.js Application Development + Certified OpenJS Node.js Application Developer (JSNAD)
Node.js Services Development + Certified OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD)
Cloud Foundry for Developers + Cloud Foundry Certified Developer (CFCD)
ONAP Fundamentals + Certified ONAP Professional (COP)

View full sale details

If you aren’t sure what to pursue, that’s ok! Check out our Plan Your Training page to view learning paths, or take our Career Path Quiz to figure out which area of technology best fits your interests and personality.

The post Our Back to School Sale is On! appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post Our Back to School Sale is On! appeared first on Linux.com.

Level up your Ansible skills while having fun: Sysadmin after dark

Tuesday 17th of August 2021 04:11:34 PM

Gaming is a great way to clear your head after a long workday, and automating game installations with Ansible means you can start playing sooner.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Level up your Ansible skills while having fun: Sysadmin after dark appeared first on Linux.com.

How and Why to Link WebAssembly Modules

Friday 13th of August 2021 08:55:27 PM

By Marco Fioretti

WebAssembly, or Wasm for brevity, is a Web-optimized executable software format, designed to give programmers the greatest possible flexibility. Wasm binary modules can be compiled once, and then safely run anywhere, alone or embedded in other applications. In practice, Wasm needs at least three key components to keep that promise. Two of them, already presented in this series, are the WebAssembly System Interface (WASI), and Wasm Interface Types.

WASI gives Wasm modules standard, language-independent ways to interact with any host environment in which they may land. The Interface Types, instead, are equally standardized definitions, but for all kinds of software variables. By using them, Wasm modules can pass complex data structures to each other without risking corrupting them, even if they were written by independent programmers in very different source languages. The other main piece of this puzzle is called module linking. This is what allows distinct binary files to interact directly – for example using each other’s functions – as if they were both written as different sections of the same source code and then compiled together.

The pros and cons of linking Wasm modules

The first reason to link Wasm modules is one that is always valid in every area of programming, which is reuse. If a library of, say, mathematical or networking functions can be written (and maintained!) once, but in a way that allows thousands of programmers to use it with little or no effort, everybody wins.

The other reason is even simpler, but particularly important for a format like Wasm: speed. At least for the foreseeable future, most Wasm modules will be downloaded by some remote server, possibly on a slow mobile link, to be executed on the fly. In all such cases, every extra second spent downloading and preparing code can make a difference. If a large Wasm application is split in separate, interlinkable modules, its host can download only the ones its own users need, and only when they actually need them. To further reduce downloads, frequently requested modules can even be cached locally.

Of course, there can be too much of a good thing. Using many modules, especially from many independent sources, speeds up software development, but can make its maintenance more complex in the long run. At the same time, on any stable network, downloading and linking several modules takes, almost by definition, more time than getting just one blob of code that does exactly the same thing. In addition, function calls between linked Wasm modules “can be slower than function calls within one module”. Overall, all these factors may lead to a real-world performance hit of a few percentage points. In many cases, this will be a very reasonable price to pay.

The Wasm way to link modules

Independently developed Wasm modules can always be “linked” in the same way used for countless software applications, which is at compile time. This produces one executable file that has all the desired features and is ready to run inside any Wasm/WASI compliant virtual machine. Besides depending on the specific languages and toolchain used to generate each executable file, however, this static linking is almost the opposite of the desired result: a “portable, host- and language-independent ecosystem” of WebAssembly modules that are composable as needed after, not before downloading them, and regardless of where they came from.

A first, if small step in this direction consists of using the already mentioned Wasm Interface Types: they can, in fact, let different Wasm modules exchange copies of their data structures, without actually sharing them but as if they were parts of the same program. This limited form of cooperation among modules is called “Shared-Nothing Linking”.

The kind of linking that is really consistent with the core Wasm philosophy, however, is the one that happens only when and where it is really needed, does not waste resources and, above all, doesn’t put unnecessary constraints on the providers of Wasm modules. The linking, that is, should happen on the host that actually needs it, but without requiring any preparation for the modules that are linked, or any application-specific customization for the programmers who wrote them.

This means that Wasm binaries should use some virtualization technique to declare and import the other modules (or parts of them) that they want to link. This mechanism, called “link-time virtualization” would eventually allow so-called “Shared-Everything Dynamic Linking”, in which all the linked modules could directly share their memory and data tables, without duplications. The low-level, gory details of this approach are described in the corresponding section of the official Explainer for linking Wasm modules linking. Here, we only mention two of the general properties, or constraints, that every “pure-Wasm” linking solution should include.

The first one is the “Principle of Least Authority”, by which every Wasm module must always expose to its host, or demand from it, only the smallest possible subset of capabilities that it needs to do its job. The other is, to put it simply, that linking modules should not make Garbage Collection in Wasm more complicated than it already is.

In practice: Emscripten, JavaScript APIs and WAPM

The most elementary tools to create and use from scratch linked Wasm modules are functions like dlopen() in C or C++ or, in JavaScript, the equivalent WebAssembly APIs. With the proper instructions, the Emscripten toolchain can add, to the glue logic that makes JavaScript virtual machines load and run Wasm code, a dynamicLibraries array that lists all the modules that should be downloaded and then linked. To study or use complete linkable modules instead, check out the official registry of the WebAssembly Package Manager (WAPM), an open source tool whose purpose is exactly to facilitate the publication and installation of such modules.

The post How and Why to Link WebAssembly Modules appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post How and Why to Link WebAssembly Modules appeared first on Linux.com.

Open Mainframe Project Announces the Full Schedule for the 2nd Annual Open Mainframe Summit on September 22-23

Friday 13th of August 2021 03:06:00 AM

The open source mainframe virtual event features keynote speakers from DeployHub, FINOS, Jono Bacon Consulting, the Linux Foundation, ZEDEDA and more 

SAN FRANCISCO, August 12, 2021 The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, today announces the complete schedule of the 2nd annual Open Mainframe Summit. This year’s virtual event, which takes place on September 22-23, will feature keynote speakers Gabriele Columbro, Executive Director of Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS); Jason Shepherd, Vice President of Ecosystem at ZEDEDA and Chair of the LF Edge Governing Board; Jono Bacon, a leading community and collaboration speaker and founder of Jono Bacon Consulting; Steve Winslow, Vice President of Compliance and Legal at The Linux Foundation; Tracy Ragan, CEO and Co-Founder of DeployHub and Continuous Delivery Foundation Board Member, and more.

The theme of this year’s Open Mainframe Summit expands beyond the mainframe to highlight influencers with strengths in the areas supporting or leveraging the technology like continuous delivery, edge computing, financial services and open source. It will also highlight projects, diversity and business topics that will offer seasoned professionals, developers, students and leaders an opportunity to share best practices and network with like-minded individuals.

Conference Sessions highlight projects, diversity and business topics such as:

Mainframe Mavens: 5 Women to Know – Stacey Miller, Global Product Marketing Manager at SUSE and Yvette LaMar, Director of the IBM Z Influencer Ecosystem at IBMThe Facts about COBOL – Misty Decker, Product Marketing Director at Micro Focus; Derek Britton, Director of Communications and Brand Strategy at Micro Focus; and Cameron Seay, Adjunct Instructor at East Carolina UniversityMaking Our Strong Community Stronger moderated by Dr. Gloria Chance, CEO at Mousai Group -Jeanne Glass, CEO and Founder of VirtualZ Computing; David Jeffries, Vice President of Development IBM z/OS Software at IBM; Greg Lotko, Broadcom; Andy Youniss, Rocket SoftwareConsoleZ – Accessing z/VM Console Data from a Browser – Mike MacIsaac, Systems Programmer at ADPWorkflow wiZard: A Flexible Workflow Creation Tool for z/OSMF – Ray Cole, Product Architect at BMC SoftwareFeilong: The Open Source API for z/VM Automation – Mike Friesenegger, Solutions Architect at SUSEIntegrating Tessia for Self-Provisioning of Linux Distributions on Z – Alexander Efremkin, Tessia Architect, Linux Workload Enablement on IBM Z at IBMIntroducing ZEBRA – an Incubation Project for Zowe – Salisu Ali, Student at Bayero University Kano, Andrew Twydell, Intern at IBM and Alex Kim, Enterprise Solutions Architect at Vicom InfinityDIY: Zowe Explorer Starter Kit – Jessielaine Punongbayan, Product Marketing Engineer at Broadcom and Richelle Anne Craw, Senior Software Engineer at Broadcom

With a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion, Open Mainframe Project worked closely with the CHAOSS Diversity & Inclusion Badging Program, which encourages events to obtain D&I badges for leadership, self-reflection, and self-improvement on issues critical to building the Internet as a social good. Open Mainframe Summit earned a Gold Badge for prioritizing diversity and inclusion.

See the full conference schedule here. Conference Registration for the online event is $50 for general attendance and $15 for academia.

Open Mainframe Summit is made possible thanks to Platinum Sponsors Broadcom, IBM, Rocket Software and SUSE; Gold Sponsors Micro Focus and Vicom Infinity; Silver Sponsor BMC; and Academic and Community Sponsors CD Foundation and FINOS. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here

Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Maemalynn at maemalynn@linuxfoundation.org.

About the Open Mainframe Project

The Open Mainframe Project is intended to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. With a vision of Open Source on the Mainframe as the standard for enterprise class systems and applications, the project’s mission is to build community and adoption of Open Source on the mainframe by eliminating barriers to Open Source adoption on the mainframe, demonstrating value of the mainframe on technical and business levels, and strengthening collaboration points and resources for the community to thrive. Learn more about the project at https://www.openmainframeproject.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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The post Open Mainframe Project Announces the Full Schedule for the 2nd Annual Open Mainframe Summit on September 22-23 appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Open Mainframe Project Announces the Full Schedule for the 2nd Annual Open Mainframe Summit on September 22-23 appeared first on Linux.com.

Facebook, Google, Isovalent, Microsoft and Netflix Launch eBPF Foundation as Part of the Linux Foundation

Thursday 12th of August 2021 10:48:01 PM

Industry leaders come together to drive the growth of eBPF as a transformational technology to redefine networking, security, tracing and observability

SAN FRANCISCO, August 12, 2021 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that it is hosting the eBPF Foundation. Founding members include Facebook, Google, Isovalent, Microsoft and Netflix. This comes in advance of the eBPF Summit, a free and virtual event taking place August 18-19, 2021.

eBPF allows developers to safely and efficiently embed programs in any piece of software, including the operating system kernel. As a result, eBPF is quickly becoming the method of choice for achieving a wide range of infrastructure use cases, delivering significant efficiency and performance gains and dramatically reducing the complexity of the system. For example, Facebook is using eBPF as the primary software-defined load balancer in its data centers, and Google is using Cilium to bring eBPF-based networking and security to the managed Kubernetes offerings GKE and Anthos.

“eBPF is a revolutionary technology that allows us to modify operating system behavior in real time without risky or expensive kernel code changes. It’s had a remarkable impact on our ability to iterate quickly on everything from networking to security to containerization,” said Alexei Starovoitov, Co-creator and Maintainer of eBPF, Kernel Developer at Facebook.

eBPF changes the way operating systems and infrastructure services are designed. It bridges the boundary between kernel and user space. It encourages and accelerates innovation and is a significant leap forward in open source technology for networking, security, application profiling/tracing and system observability use cases. eBPF enables users to even combine and apply logic across multiple subsystems which were traditionally completely independent.

“eBPF has redefined the way we think about the operating system and has led to a massive wave of innovation in networking, security, and observability. Because of its deep relevance in the cloud native world, eBPF adoption has been accelerating at an incredible pace,” said Daniel Borkmann, Co-creator and Maintainer of eBPF, Kernel Developer at Isovalent.

By making the OS kernel programmable, infrastructure software can leverage existing layers, making them more intelligent, scalable and feature-rich without continuing to add additional layers of complexity to the system. eBPF has resulted in the development of a completely new generation of tooling in areas such as networking, security, application profiling/tracing and performance troubleshooting that no longer rely on existing kernel functionality but instead actively reprogram runtime behavior without compromising execution efficiency or safety.

The eBPF Foundation will expand the significant level of contributions being made to extend the powerful capabilities of eBPF and grow beyond Linux. It will be the home for open source eBPF projects and technologies and nurture the community through a variety of activities, including summits and other collaboration events in order to further drive the growth and adoption of the eBPF ecosystem.

“eBPF is one of the greatest examples of the kind of innovation that happens in the Linux community and encompasses technologies that are natural for us to host. It also represents the future of operating systems and microservices delivery,” said Mike Dolan, general manager and senior vice president of projects at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to supporting the work of the eBPF Foundation and community.”

For more information, please visit: https://www.ebpf.io

Member Quotes

Facebook
“For many years, eBPF has played a critical role in accelerating the kernel development — thanks to the tireless work of many dedicated developers and maintainers,” said Chris Mason, Kernel Maintainer and Engineering Director at Facebook. “We’re excited to support the work of the eBPF community, enabling them to build the tools needed to power the next generation of Linux system development.”

Google
“We are excited to see the Linux Foundation announce their decision to host eBPF,” said Chris DiBona, director of open source at Google. “eBPF is the future of networking for the Linux kernel and Google is pleased to be part of the evolving standard it has created.”

Isovalent
“The programmability of eBPF has enabled a revolution in security, observability, and networking. In particular in the area of containers and the cloud native space more broadly. We are proud to have played a central role in developing and co-maintaining eBPF from its early days to the industry standard it has become. We are looking forward to continuing to work with the community,” said Thomas Graf, Chief Technology Officer, Isovalent. “Even though eBPF has already found its ways into the production stacks of countless enterprises, we are still at the beginning of the innovation curve that eBPF as a technology unlocks.”

Microsoft
“eBPF has resulted in a new generation of tooling that allows developers to easily diagnose problems, innovate quickly, and extend operating system functionality,” said Mark Russinovich, Chief Technology Officer, Microsoft Azure. “Microsoft looks forward to partnering with the community in further expanding the use of eBPF in new scenarios and platforms.  We’re excited to collaborate with the other founding members and hope additional organizations will join.”

Netflix
“eBPF is a new type of software that provides superpower capabilities, birthing an industry of networking, performance, and security technologies,” said Brendan Gregg, senior performance engineer at Netflix. “Netflix has pioneered uses of eBPF for observability, providing insight into countless areas that were previously difficult or prohibitively expensive to instrument. eBPF has helped us lower application latency and find cost savings. Netflix is delighted to join the eBPF Foundation to collaborate and develop more exciting technologies.”

Supporting Quote

Intel
Intel welcomes the creation of the eBPF Foundation. Technologies including eBPF have the potential to revolutionize critical applications and use cases across compute, storage, networking, and next generation infrastructure. We are excited to continue to contribute to eBPF and look forward to working with the new eBPF Foundation to accelerate customer workloads and unlock innovation,” said Jesse Brandeburg, a Principal Software Engineer in the Ethernet Products Group at Intel.

About The Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. The Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
for the Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

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The Linux Foundation and Fintech Open Source Foundation Announce the Agenda for Open Source Strategy Forum London 2021, Oct 4-5

Wednesday 11th of August 2021 10:24:28 PM

Experts from financial services, technology and open source will come together to deepen collaboration and drive innovation across the industry in order to deliver better code, faster.

SAN FRANCISCO, August 11, 2021 —  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and co-host Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), a nonprofit whose mission is to accelerate adoption of open source software, standards and best practices in financial services, today announced the conference agenda for Open Source Strategy Forum London 2021 (OSSF). The event takes place October 4-5 in London, England. The schedule can be viewed here.

The event will gather experts from financial services, technology and open source who will come together for thought-provoking insights and conversations, providing unique opportunities to hear from and engage with those who are leveraging open source software to solve industry challenges. OSSF is the only conference dedicated to driving collaboration and innovation in financial services through open source.

The event will feature 35+ sessions and endless opportunities to learn about the most cutting edge topics at the cross section of finance, open source and technology, revealing recent developments and the direction of open source in financial services.

Conference Session Highlights:

An Open-sourced Solution to Data Governance? How Legend May Be the Answer to Data Quality Concerns in the Financial Industry – Ffion Acland & Beeke-Marie Nelke, Goldman SachsNew Generation of Mainframers – John Mertic, The Linux Foundation; Jessielaine Punongbayan, Broadcom; and Alex Kim, Vicom InfinityOpen Banking, Open Source, and Open Standards – Kevin Morris, Large Credit Union CoalitionHow to Maximize Open Source Investment to Drive Business Innovation – Traci Robinson-Williams, GitLabIf It’s Such a Good Idea, Why Haven’t We Been Doing It? – Gil Yehuda, U.S. BankDevelop Automated Workflows in Seconds – Olivier Poupeney, Symphony Communication Services

Registration is offered at the early price of 220 GBP through Aug 17. Members of The Linux Foundation receive a 20 percent discount – members can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. Members of FINOS can attend at no cost – members can contact ossf@finos.org to request the FINOS Member registration code. 

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and wear a mask while onsite at the event. Additionally, all attendees will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Diversity & Need-Based Scholarships and Travel Funding

Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. We place an emphasis on funding applicants who are from historically underrepresented or untapped groups and/or those of lower socioeconomic status. To learn more and apply, click here.

Sponsor

For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team. The Sponsorship deadline is September 9. 

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact

Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation

koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

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How OpenStack uses Ceph for storage

Wednesday 11th of August 2021 10:05:04 PM

You may know that OpenStack can use Ceph as back-end storage, but do you know how it works?
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post How OpenStack uses Ceph for storage appeared first on Linux.com.

Build a lab in five minutes with three simple commands

Wednesday 11th of August 2021 08:41:59 AM

It’s handy to have a lab environment separate from your day-to-day workstation. Use these commands to set up a place to learn and experiment without risking your work environment.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Build a lab in five minutes with three simple commands appeared first on Linux.com.

Funded open source security work at the Linux Foundation

Tuesday 10th of August 2021 11:00:00 PM

Open source software (OSS) is vitally important to the functioning of society today; it underpins much of the global economy. However, some OSS is highly secure, while others are not as secure as they need to be.

By its very nature, open source enables worldwide peer review, yet while its transparency has the potential for enhanced software security, that potential isn’t always realized. Many people are working to improve things where it’s needed. Most of that work is done by volunteers or organizations outside the Linux Foundation (LF) who directly pay people to do the work (typically as employees). Often those people work together within a foundation that’s part of the Linux Foundation. Sometimes, however, the LF or an LF foundation/project (e.g., a fund) directly funds people to do security work.

At the Linux Foundation (LF), I have the privilege of overseeing focused work to improve OSS security by the very people paid to do it. This work is funded through various grants and foundations, with credits to organizations like Google, Microsoft, the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF), the LF Public Health foundation, and the LF itself.

The LF and its foundations do much more that I don’t oversee, so I’ve only listed the ones I am personally involved with in the interest of brevity. I hope it will give you a sense of some of the things we’re doing that you might not know about otherwise.

The typical LF oversight process for this work is described in “Post-Approval LF Security Funding.” Generally, performers must provide a periodic summary of their work so they can get paid. Most of those summaries are public, and in those cases, it’s easy for others to learn about their interesting work!

Here’s a sample of the work I oversee:

Ariadne Conill is improving Alpine Linux security, including significant improvements to its vulnerability processing and making it reproducible. For example, as noted in the July 2021 report, this resulted in Alpine 3.14 being released with the lowest open vulnerability count in the final release in a long time. Alpine Linux’s security is important because many containers use it. For more information, see “Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in June” and “Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in July.”kpcyrd is doing a lot of reproducible build work on Linux distributions, especially Alpine Linux (including on the Raspberry Pi) and Arch Linux. Reproducible builds are a strong countermeasure against build system attacks (such as the devastating attack on SolarWinds Orion). More than half of the currently unreproducible packages in Arch Linux have now been reviewed and classified.David Huseby has been working on modifying git to have a much more flexible cryptographic signing infrastructure. This will make it easier to verify the integrity of software source code; git is widely used to manage source code.Theo de Raadt has also been receiving funding to secure the critical “plumbing” behind modern communications infrastructure:This funding is being used towards improving OpenSSH (a widely-used tool whose security is critical). These include various smaller improvements, an updated configuration file parser, and a transition to using the SFTP protocol rather than the older RCP protocol inside the scp(1) program.It is also being used to improve rpki-client, implementing Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI). RPKI is an important protocol for protecting the Internet’s routing protocols from attack. These improvements implement the RPKI Repository Delta Protocol (RRDP) data transfer protocol and fix various edge cases (e.g., through additional validation checks). The https://irrexplorer.nlnog.net/ service is even using rpki-client behind the scenes.

Nathan Chancellor is improving the Linux kernel’s ability to be compiled with clang (instead of just gcc). This includes eliminating warning messages from clang (which helps to reduce kernel bugs even when gcc is used) and fixing/extending the clang compiler (which helps clang users when compiling code other than the Linux kernel). Unsurprisingly this involves changing both the Linux kernel and the clang/LLVM compiler infrastructure, and sometimes other software as well.In the long run, eliminating warnings that by themselves aren’t bugs is important; developers will ignore warnings if there are many irrelevant ones, but if there are only a few warnings, they’ll examine them (making warnings more useful).Of notable mention for security implications is clang support for Control-Flow Integrity (CFI); this can counter many attacks on arm64, and work will eventually enable x86_64 support.

I oversee some security audits conducted via the Open Source Technology Improvement Fund (OSTIF) when funded through the LF. We (the LF) often work with OSTIF to conduct security audits. We work with OSTIF to define the audit scope, and then OSTIF runs a bidding process where qualified security audit firms propose to do the work. We then work with OSTIF to select the winner (who isn’t always the cheapest — we want good work, not a box-check). OSTIF & I then oversee the process and review the final result. Note that we don’t just want to do audits, we also want to fix or mitigate any critical issues the audits identify, but the audits help us find the key problems. Subject matter experts perform the audit reports, and handling bidding is OSTIF’s primary focus, so my main contribution is usually to help ensure these reports are clear to non-experts while still being accurate. Experts sometimes forget to explain their context and jargon, and it’s sometimes hard to fix that (you must know the terminology & technology to explain it).This work included two security audits related to the Linux kernel, one for signing and key management policies and the other for vulnerability reporting and remediation. I’ve also overseen audits of the exposure notification applications COVID Shield and COVID Green: It’s not part of my oversight of OSTIF on behalf of the LF, but I also informally talk with OSTIF about other OSS they’re auditing (such as flux2, lodash, jackson-core, jackson-databind, httpcomponents-core, httpcomponents-client, laravel, and slf4j). A little coordination and advice-sharing among experts can make everything better.

The future is hard to predict, but we anticipate that we will be doing more. In late July, the OpenSSF Technical Advisory Council (TAC) recommended approving funding for a security audit of (part of) Symfony, a widely-used web framework. The OpenSSF Governing Board (GB) approved this on 2021-08-05 and I expect OSTIF will soon take bids on it.

The OpenSSF is also taking steps to raise more money via membership dues (this was delayed due to COVID; starting a new foundation is harder during a pandemic). Once the OpenSSF has more money, we expect they’ll be funding a lot more work to identify critical projects, do security audits, fix problems, and improve or create projects to enhance OSS security. The future looks bright.

Please remember that this is only a small part of ongoing work to improve OSS security. Almost all LF projects need to be secure, so most foundations’ projects include security efforts not listed here. As noted earlier, most development work is done by volunteers or by non-LF organizations directly paying people to do the work (typically employees). 

The OpenSSF has several working groups and many projects where people are working together to improve OSS security. These include free courses on how to develop secure software and the CII Best Practices badge project. We (at the LF) also have many other projects working to improve OSS security. For example, sigstore is making cryptographic signatures much easier; sigstore’s “cosign” tool just released its version 1.0. Many organizations have recently become interested in software bill-of-materials (SBOMs), and we’ve been working on SBOMs for a long time.

If you or your organization would like to fund focused work on improving OSS security, please reach out! You can contribute to the OpenSSF (in general or as a directed fund); just contact them (e.g., Microsoft contributed to OpenSSF in December 2020). If you’d prefer, you can create a grant directly with the Linux Foundation itself — just email me at <dwheeler@linuxfoundation.org> if you have questions. For smaller amounts, say to fund a specific project, you can also consider using the LFX crowdfunding tools to fund or request funding. Many people & organizations struggle to pay individual OSS developers because of the need to handle taxes and oversight. If that’s your concern, talk to us. The LF has experience & processes to do all that, letting experts focus on getting the work done.

My sincere thanks to all the performers for their important work and to all the funders for their confidence in us!

About the author: David A. Wheeler is Director of Open Source Supply Chain Security for The Linux Foundation.

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How to set up and use Python virtual environments for Ansible

Sunday 8th of August 2021 04:52:41 PM

Python’s venv module gives you freedom to test new Ansible features before deploying them to production and without disturbing your system install.
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