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Updated: 1 hour 27 min ago

Facebook, Google, Isovalent, Microsoft and Netflix Launch eBPF Foundation as Part of the Linux Foundation

Thursday 12th of August 2021 10:48:01 PM

Industry leaders come together to drive the growth of eBPF as a transformational technology to redefine networking, security, tracing and observability

SAN FRANCISCO, August 12, 2021 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that it is hosting the eBPF Foundation. Founding members include Facebook, Google, Isovalent, Microsoft and Netflix. This comes in advance of the eBPF Summit, a free and virtual event taking place August 18-19, 2021.

eBPF allows developers to safely and efficiently embed programs in any piece of software, including the operating system kernel. As a result, eBPF is quickly becoming the method of choice for achieving a wide range of infrastructure use cases, delivering significant efficiency and performance gains and dramatically reducing the complexity of the system. For example, Facebook is using eBPF as the primary software-defined load balancer in its data centers, and Google is using Cilium to bring eBPF-based networking and security to the managed Kubernetes offerings GKE and Anthos.

“eBPF is a revolutionary technology that allows us to modify operating system behavior in real time without risky or expensive kernel code changes. It’s had a remarkable impact on our ability to iterate quickly on everything from networking to security to containerization,” said Alexei Starovoitov, Co-creator and Maintainer of eBPF, Kernel Developer at Facebook.

eBPF changes the way operating systems and infrastructure services are designed. It bridges the boundary between kernel and user space. It encourages and accelerates innovation and is a significant leap forward in open source technology for networking, security, application profiling/tracing and system observability use cases. eBPF enables users to even combine and apply logic across multiple subsystems which were traditionally completely independent.

“eBPF has redefined the way we think about the operating system and has led to a massive wave of innovation in networking, security, and observability. Because of its deep relevance in the cloud native world, eBPF adoption has been accelerating at an incredible pace,” said Daniel Borkmann, Co-creator and Maintainer of eBPF, Kernel Developer at Isovalent.

By making the OS kernel programmable, infrastructure software can leverage existing layers, making them more intelligent, scalable and feature-rich without continuing to add additional layers of complexity to the system. eBPF has resulted in the development of a completely new generation of tooling in areas such as networking, security, application profiling/tracing and performance troubleshooting that no longer rely on existing kernel functionality but instead actively reprogram runtime behavior without compromising execution efficiency or safety.

The eBPF Foundation will expand the significant level of contributions being made to extend the powerful capabilities of eBPF and grow beyond Linux. It will be the home for open source eBPF projects and technologies and nurture the community through a variety of activities, including summits and other collaboration events in order to further drive the growth and adoption of the eBPF ecosystem.

“eBPF is one of the greatest examples of the kind of innovation that happens in the Linux community and encompasses technologies that are natural for us to host. It also represents the future of operating systems and microservices delivery,” said Mike Dolan, general manager and senior vice president of projects at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to supporting the work of the eBPF Foundation and community.”

For more information, please visit: https://www.ebpf.io

Member Quotes

Facebook
“For many years, eBPF has played a critical role in accelerating the kernel development — thanks to the tireless work of many dedicated developers and maintainers,” said Chris Mason, Kernel Maintainer and Engineering Director at Facebook. “We’re excited to support the work of the eBPF community, enabling them to build the tools needed to power the next generation of Linux system development.”

Google
“We are excited to see the Linux Foundation announce their decision to host eBPF,” said Chris DiBona, director of open source at Google. “eBPF is the future of networking for the Linux kernel and Google is pleased to be part of the evolving standard it has created.”

Isovalent
“The programmability of eBPF has enabled a revolution in security, observability, and networking. In particular in the area of containers and the cloud native space more broadly. We are proud to have played a central role in developing and co-maintaining eBPF from its early days to the industry standard it has become. We are looking forward to continuing to work with the community,” said Thomas Graf, Chief Technology Officer, Isovalent. “Even though eBPF has already found its ways into the production stacks of countless enterprises, we are still at the beginning of the innovation curve that eBPF as a technology unlocks.”

Microsoft
“eBPF has resulted in a new generation of tooling that allows developers to easily diagnose problems, innovate quickly, and extend operating system functionality,” said Mark Russinovich, Chief Technology Officer, Microsoft Azure. “Microsoft looks forward to partnering with the community in further expanding the use of eBPF in new scenarios and platforms.  We’re excited to collaborate with the other founding members and hope additional organizations will join.”

Netflix
“eBPF is a new type of software that provides superpower capabilities, birthing an industry of networking, performance, and security technologies,” said Brendan Gregg, senior performance engineer at Netflix. “Netflix has pioneered uses of eBPF for observability, providing insight into countless areas that were previously difficult or prohibitively expensive to instrument. eBPF has helped us lower application latency and find cost savings. Netflix is delighted to join the eBPF Foundation to collaborate and develop more exciting technologies.”

Supporting Quote

Intel
Intel welcomes the creation of the eBPF Foundation. Technologies including eBPF have the potential to revolutionize critical applications and use cases across compute, storage, networking, and next generation infrastructure. We are excited to continue to contribute to eBPF and look forward to working with the new eBPF Foundation to accelerate customer workloads and unlock innovation,” said Jesse Brandeburg, a Principal Software Engineer in the Ethernet Products Group at Intel.

About The Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. The Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
for the Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

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The Linux Foundation and Fintech Open Source Foundation Announce the Agenda for Open Source Strategy Forum London 2021, Oct 4-5

Wednesday 11th of August 2021 10:24:28 PM

Experts from financial services, technology and open source will come together to deepen collaboration and drive innovation across the industry in order to deliver better code, faster.

SAN FRANCISCO, August 11, 2021 —  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and co-host Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), a nonprofit whose mission is to accelerate adoption of open source software, standards and best practices in financial services, today announced the conference agenda for Open Source Strategy Forum London 2021 (OSSF). The event takes place October 4-5 in London, England. The schedule can be viewed here.

The event will gather experts from financial services, technology and open source who will come together for thought-provoking insights and conversations, providing unique opportunities to hear from and engage with those who are leveraging open source software to solve industry challenges. OSSF is the only conference dedicated to driving collaboration and innovation in financial services through open source.

The event will feature 35+ sessions and endless opportunities to learn about the most cutting edge topics at the cross section of finance, open source and technology, revealing recent developments and the direction of open source in financial services.

Conference Session Highlights:

An Open-sourced Solution to Data Governance? How Legend May Be the Answer to Data Quality Concerns in the Financial Industry – Ffion Acland & Beeke-Marie Nelke, Goldman SachsNew Generation of Mainframers – John Mertic, The Linux Foundation; Jessielaine Punongbayan, Broadcom; and Alex Kim, Vicom InfinityOpen Banking, Open Source, and Open Standards – Kevin Morris, Large Credit Union CoalitionHow to Maximize Open Source Investment to Drive Business Innovation – Traci Robinson-Williams, GitLabIf It’s Such a Good Idea, Why Haven’t We Been Doing It? – Gil Yehuda, U.S. BankDevelop Automated Workflows in Seconds – Olivier Poupeney, Symphony Communication Services

Registration is offered at the early price of 220 GBP through Aug 17. Members of The Linux Foundation receive a 20 percent discount – members can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. Members of FINOS can attend at no cost – members can contact ossf@finos.org to request the FINOS Member registration code. 

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and wear a mask while onsite at the event. Additionally, all attendees will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Diversity & Need-Based Scholarships and Travel Funding

Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. We place an emphasis on funding applicants who are from historically underrepresented or untapped groups and/or those of lower socioeconomic status. To learn more and apply, click here.

Sponsor

For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team. The Sponsorship deadline is September 9. 

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact

Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation

koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

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How OpenStack uses Ceph for storage

Wednesday 11th of August 2021 10:05:04 PM

You may know that OpenStack can use Ceph as back-end storage, but do you know how it works?
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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Build a lab in five minutes with three simple commands

Wednesday 11th of August 2021 08:41:59 AM

It’s handy to have a lab environment separate from your day-to-day workstation. Use these commands to set up a place to learn and experiment without risking your work environment.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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Funded open source security work at the Linux Foundation

Tuesday 10th of August 2021 11:00:00 PM

Open source software (OSS) is vitally important to the functioning of society today; it underpins much of the global economy. However, some OSS is highly secure, while others are not as secure as they need to be.

By its very nature, open source enables worldwide peer review, yet while its transparency has the potential for enhanced software security, that potential isn’t always realized. Many people are working to improve things where it’s needed. Most of that work is done by volunteers or organizations outside the Linux Foundation (LF) who directly pay people to do the work (typically as employees). Often those people work together within a foundation that’s part of the Linux Foundation. Sometimes, however, the LF or an LF foundation/project (e.g., a fund) directly funds people to do security work.

At the Linux Foundation (LF), I have the privilege of overseeing focused work to improve OSS security by the very people paid to do it. This work is funded through various grants and foundations, with credits to organizations like Google, Microsoft, the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF), the LF Public Health foundation, and the LF itself.

The LF and its foundations do much more that I don’t oversee, so I’ve only listed the ones I am personally involved with in the interest of brevity. I hope it will give you a sense of some of the things we’re doing that you might not know about otherwise.

The typical LF oversight process for this work is described in “Post-Approval LF Security Funding.” Generally, performers must provide a periodic summary of their work so they can get paid. Most of those summaries are public, and in those cases, it’s easy for others to learn about their interesting work!

Here’s a sample of the work I oversee:

Ariadne Conill is improving Alpine Linux security, including significant improvements to its vulnerability processing and making it reproducible. For example, as noted in the July 2021 report, this resulted in Alpine 3.14 being released with the lowest open vulnerability count in the final release in a long time. Alpine Linux’s security is important because many containers use it. For more information, see “Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in June” and “Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in July.”kpcyrd is doing a lot of reproducible build work on Linux distributions, especially Alpine Linux (including on the Raspberry Pi) and Arch Linux. Reproducible builds are a strong countermeasure against build system attacks (such as the devastating attack on SolarWinds Orion). More than half of the currently unreproducible packages in Arch Linux have now been reviewed and classified.David Huseby has been working on modifying git to have a much more flexible cryptographic signing infrastructure. This will make it easier to verify the integrity of software source code; git is widely used to manage source code.Theo de Raadt has also been receiving funding to secure the critical “plumbing” behind modern communications infrastructure:This funding is being used towards improving OpenSSH (a widely-used tool whose security is critical). These include various smaller improvements, an updated configuration file parser, and a transition to using the SFTP protocol rather than the older RCP protocol inside the scp(1) program.It is also being used to improve rpki-client, implementing Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI). RPKI is an important protocol for protecting the Internet’s routing protocols from attack. These improvements implement the RPKI Repository Delta Protocol (RRDP) data transfer protocol and fix various edge cases (e.g., through additional validation checks). The https://irrexplorer.nlnog.net/ service is even using rpki-client behind the scenes.

Nathan Chancellor is improving the Linux kernel’s ability to be compiled with clang (instead of just gcc). This includes eliminating warning messages from clang (which helps to reduce kernel bugs even when gcc is used) and fixing/extending the clang compiler (which helps clang users when compiling code other than the Linux kernel). Unsurprisingly this involves changing both the Linux kernel and the clang/LLVM compiler infrastructure, and sometimes other software as well.In the long run, eliminating warnings that by themselves aren’t bugs is important; developers will ignore warnings if there are many irrelevant ones, but if there are only a few warnings, they’ll examine them (making warnings more useful).Of notable mention for security implications is clang support for Control-Flow Integrity (CFI); this can counter many attacks on arm64, and work will eventually enable x86_64 support.

I oversee some security audits conducted via the Open Source Technology Improvement Fund (OSTIF) when funded through the LF. We (the LF) often work with OSTIF to conduct security audits. We work with OSTIF to define the audit scope, and then OSTIF runs a bidding process where qualified security audit firms propose to do the work. We then work with OSTIF to select the winner (who isn’t always the cheapest — we want good work, not a box-check). OSTIF & I then oversee the process and review the final result. Note that we don’t just want to do audits, we also want to fix or mitigate any critical issues the audits identify, but the audits help us find the key problems. Subject matter experts perform the audit reports, and handling bidding is OSTIF’s primary focus, so my main contribution is usually to help ensure these reports are clear to non-experts while still being accurate. Experts sometimes forget to explain their context and jargon, and it’s sometimes hard to fix that (you must know the terminology & technology to explain it).This work included two security audits related to the Linux kernel, one for signing and key management policies and the other for vulnerability reporting and remediation. I’ve also overseen audits of the exposure notification applications COVID Shield and COVID Green: It’s not part of my oversight of OSTIF on behalf of the LF, but I also informally talk with OSTIF about other OSS they’re auditing (such as flux2, lodash, jackson-core, jackson-databind, httpcomponents-core, httpcomponents-client, laravel, and slf4j). A little coordination and advice-sharing among experts can make everything better.

The future is hard to predict, but we anticipate that we will be doing more. In late July, the OpenSSF Technical Advisory Council (TAC) recommended approving funding for a security audit of (part of) Symfony, a widely-used web framework. The OpenSSF Governing Board (GB) approved this on 2021-08-05 and I expect OSTIF will soon take bids on it.

The OpenSSF is also taking steps to raise more money via membership dues (this was delayed due to COVID; starting a new foundation is harder during a pandemic). Once the OpenSSF has more money, we expect they’ll be funding a lot more work to identify critical projects, do security audits, fix problems, and improve or create projects to enhance OSS security. The future looks bright.

Please remember that this is only a small part of ongoing work to improve OSS security. Almost all LF projects need to be secure, so most foundations’ projects include security efforts not listed here. As noted earlier, most development work is done by volunteers or by non-LF organizations directly paying people to do the work (typically employees). 

The OpenSSF has several working groups and many projects where people are working together to improve OSS security. These include free courses on how to develop secure software and the CII Best Practices badge project. We (at the LF) also have many other projects working to improve OSS security. For example, sigstore is making cryptographic signatures much easier; sigstore’s “cosign” tool just released its version 1.0. Many organizations have recently become interested in software bill-of-materials (SBOMs), and we’ve been working on SBOMs for a long time.

If you or your organization would like to fund focused work on improving OSS security, please reach out! You can contribute to the OpenSSF (in general or as a directed fund); just contact them (e.g., Microsoft contributed to OpenSSF in December 2020). If you’d prefer, you can create a grant directly with the Linux Foundation itself — just email me at <dwheeler@linuxfoundation.org> if you have questions. For smaller amounts, say to fund a specific project, you can also consider using the LFX crowdfunding tools to fund or request funding. Many people & organizations struggle to pay individual OSS developers because of the need to handle taxes and oversight. If that’s your concern, talk to us. The LF has experience & processes to do all that, letting experts focus on getting the work done.

My sincere thanks to all the performers for their important work and to all the funders for their confidence in us!

About the author: David A. Wheeler is Director of Open Source Supply Chain Security for The Linux Foundation.

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How to set up and use Python virtual environments for Ansible

Sunday 8th of August 2021 04:52:41 PM

Python’s venv module gives you freedom to test new Ansible features before deploying them to production and without disturbing your system install.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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A sysadmin’s guide to setting up collaboration with Mattermost

Saturday 7th of August 2021 03:58:35 PM

Mattermost offers sysadmins an open source, on-premises collaboration suite that can be customized easily to suit a team’s specific needs.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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Deep dive into Ansible ad hoc commands

Thursday 5th of August 2021 05:42:35 PM

Make life easier when dealing with Ansible automation by using ad hoc commands.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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Vaccines + Masks for Safe In-Person Events – Read About All On-Site Safety Protocols

Thursday 5th of August 2021 02:55:20 AM

The Linux Foundation is ecstatic to return to in-person events next month; we know how important these face-to-face gatherings are to accelerating collaboration and innovation in the open source community. 

We know you have questions surrounding health and safety at in-person events and want to pause for a moment to address these. Rest assured – your health has been at the forefront of every move and decision we have made as we make a safe return back to in-person events.  

Let’s start here with some items from behind the scenes.

The LF has a long-standing relationship with Dr. Joel Selanikio, a physician, former CDC epidemiologist and outbreak investigator, and consultant epidemiologist to the DC Department of Health and to FEMA for the COVID-19 response over 2020-21. Thanks to Dr. Selanikio’s council over the last two years, we have been able to take educated and well-thought out steps to ensure the safety of our community members as we navigate COVID-19. We are working closely with local Departments of Health to ensure we are following all local requirements and recommendations. We are continuing to monitor and follow all CDC, WHO and PHE/NHS (in the UK) guidelines, in addition to those of the local municipalities in which we are holding events.We are checking in with our venues and vendors multiple times a week to ensure we are staying up-to-date on best practices and regulations.Finally, The Linux Foundation Event Team have all been certified in handling Pandemic On-Site Protocols (by the Event Leadership Institute). The team is vaccinated, trained and equipped to handle safety protocols and procedures at our events and are more than happy to assist you onsite and ensure you are comfortable.  

Vaccines, masks and everyone’s new favorite phrase: social distancing.

As announced previously, in-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status.Additionally, masks will now be required for in-person attendance.All event participants will receive a daily temperature check in order to enter the event zone and will receive a sticker to be able to enter and exit as needed.Comfort level wristbands (in green, yellow, and red) will be provided for event participants to use if they choose to indicate their preference on social distancing comfort level. 

All of the above protocols are in place for LF and LF Project events (like KubeCon + CloudNativeCon) through November 2021.

We are working closely with each of our venues and their local jurisdictions to ensure we are following all local requirements and recommendations. Here are some items you can expect on-site at any of our events through November:

Reduced conference room capacity: space between you and your neighbors.More physical space between speakers and attendees: so speakers can present without their masks (and you can hear them clearly!).Wider aisles and thoroughfares through event spaces.Sponsor booths spread further apart in the exhibit hall as well as wider aisles. Socially distanced areas for eating/drinking and mask breaksClose organization with venues: to ensure rigorous onsite cleaning and sanitizing of all touch points, sneeze guards where necessary, and sanitation stations.

You can view a full list of onsite safety procedures on the Health and Safety page, under the “Attend” tab on all event microsites at events.linuxfoundation.org.

Quick Links

View Open Source Summit + ELC + OSPOCon Health and Safety page

View Open Networking + Edge Summit & Kubernetes on Edge Day Health and Safety page

View KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Health and Safety page

We are keeping our health and safety guidelines updated regularly, and adding to the FAQ as necessary.  If these resources do not answer a question you may have, reach out to us at events@linuxfoundation.org.

After much research and with guidance from Dr. Selanikio, we believe the combination of vaccination and mask requirements, along with the other protocols we are putting in place, provides a safe environment for our in-person event participants.

We understand that not everyone will be able to join us in-person due to a variety of factors, which is why we are delighted to offer attendees the ability to participate in our events virtually. To learn more about the different pass options, click on the “Register” tab on any of our event websites.

We hope this information brings you assurance that keeping you and all our event participants safe is top of mind – and will continue to be as we make each and every decision. A big THANK YOU to the entire open source community for your understanding during this fluid COVID-19 situation and this very challenging time in our history. We look forward to seeing you at our events this fall!

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EdgeX Foundry Releases the Most Modern, Secure, and Production-Ready Open Source IoT Framework

Tuesday 3rd of August 2021 11:00:00 PM

Four-plus years of collaboration, 190+ contributors, 8 million+ container downloads, new retail project ORRA, EdgeX Ready, and foundation for future, long-term support pave the way for Ireland release

SAN FRANCISCOAugust 3, 2021 EdgeX Foundry, a project under the LF Edge umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation, today announced it’s Ireland release. Focused on edge/IoT solutions, EdgeX Foundry’s second major release overhauls API sets, removes technical debt, provides more message-based communications, and simplifies and secures interface for adopters and developers, making the platform significantly easier to use and more reliable. 

“As a leading stage 3 project under LF Edge, the EdgeX Ireland release has expanded use cases across retail, building automation, smart cities, process control, and manufacturing,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge & IoT, at the Linux Foundation. “It’s a key to standardizing IoT frameworks across market verticals.”

“This release sets in motion the opportunity for EdgeX to offer its first ever LTS or long-term support release as soon as the fall.  This is a significant commitment on the part of our open-source community to all adopters that says we stand with you, prepared to help support your use of EdgeX in real world, scalable, production deployments,” said Jim White, chief technical officer,  IoTech,  and EdgeX Foundry Technical Steering Committee Chair. 

Ireland Feature Highlights

Standardized and modernized northbound and southbound APIs enrich ease of interoperability across the IoT frameworkAdvanced security is built into the APIs, message bus, and internal architecture of EdgeXNew device services (southbound) and new app services (northbound) included in Ireland are also inherently secure (e.g., GPIO, CoAP, LLRP, UART)

Commercialization & Use Case Highlights

Open Retail Reference Architecture (ORRA): a new sub-project that provides a common deployment platform for edge-based  solutions and IoT devices. ORRA is a collaboration with fellow LF Edge projects Open Horizon and Secure Device Onboard, incubated by EdgeX Foundry.The new Edgex Ready program highlights users and organizations that have integrated their offerings with solutions leveraging EdgeX;  a precursor to a community certification program. Learn how to become EdgeX Ready through the project’s Wiki page

Learn more about Ireland’s feature enhancements in this blog post

Plans for the next EdgeX release, codenamed ‘Jakarta’ are expected in Q4’ of 2021. 

For more information about LF Edge and its projects, visit https://www.lfedge.org/

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Additional Quotes and Community Support

”Beechwoods Software has been a contributing member of EdgeX Foundry since its inception and chairs the Certification Working Group. EdgeX technology is at the core of our EOS IoT Edge platform offering for which we are readying our version 2 release based on the latest EdgeX code base. Beechwoods is pleased with the growing momentum of EdgeX Foundry and look forward to continuing our support and collaboration,” said Michael Daulerio, Vice President of Marketing and Business Development at Beechwoods Software, Inc.

“Canonical is a founding member of the EdgeX Foundry project and has provided technical leadership in the technical steering committee from day one. The Ireland (aka 2.0) release of EdgeX introduces much improved V2 REST APIs, a transition to a secure message bus for data ingestion, and many additional improvements to the security of EdgeX. The cross-company cooperation that contributed to the success and timeliness of this release once again demonstrates the power of open source development. Snaps of the Ireland release of EdgeX are available from the Snap Store using the new 2.0 track, and can be used to build secure enterprise-grade EdgeX deployments using Ubuntu Core 20,” said Tony Espy, technical architect / IoT & Devices, Canonical, and at-large  EdgeX Foundry TSC member. 

“EdgeX Foundry continues to serve as the basis for our Edge Xpert product.  As such, we see the release of EdgeX 2.0 as critical to our company’s success in support of our customers.  It provides the ability for IOTech to add new features and add more value given the new APIs, support for more messaging and overall simplifications of the platform.  On top of that, the move toward an LTS release in the fall based on EdgeX 2.0 is an important milestone of support shown by the EdgeX community.  LTS tells adopters like IOTech that the EdgeX ecosystem stands behind them and is there to provide a scalable, reliable, and robust platform that can be used in production ready solutions,” said Keith Steele, CEO, IOTech Systems. 

Resources:

Download Edge Ireland via Docker Compose:  https://github.com/edgexfoundry/edgex-compose/tree/irelandRead the Wiki: https://wiki.edgexfoundry.org/display/FA/IrelandFind more details in our latest blog: Announcing EdgeX 2.0 – the Ireland ReleaseLearn more about ORRA and join the project: https://wiki.edgexfoundry.org/display/FA/Open+Retail+Reference+Architecture: EdgeX Ready: https://wiki.edgexfoundry.org/display/FA/Open+Retail+Reference+Architecture 

The post EdgeX Foundry Releases the Most Modern, Secure, and Production-Ready Open Source IoT Framework appeared first on Linux Foundation.

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Improve Linux performance, trigger Ansible with Git push, and more tips for sysadmins

Tuesday 3rd of August 2021 12:33:49 AM

Check out Enable Sysadmin’s 10 most-read articles from July 2021.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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How to check deployment health on Red Hat OpenShift

Monday 2nd of August 2021 11:46:12 PM

Find out how to check pod status for your OpenShift deployments.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

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Keynote Speakers and Conference Schedule Announced for Open Networking & Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day 2021

Thursday 29th of July 2021 10:49:47 PM

Hosted by The Linux Foundation, along with LF Networking, LF Edge and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, this is the industry’s premier open networking & edge computing event gathering developers, architects and business leaders across enterprises, government, global services providers and cloud for education, inspiration and collaboration.

SAN FRANCISCO, July 29, 2021 —  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-hosts LF Edge, LF Networking, and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) today announced the full schedule for Open Networking & Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day. The events are taking place October 11-12 in Los Angeles, California and are being co-located with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America, among others. The schedule can be viewed here.

Open Networking & Edge Summit (ONE Summit) is THE event for End to End Connectivity Solutions powered by Open Source. It enables the collaborative development necessary to shape the future of networking and edge computing; between companies, across industry verticals and between developers, architects and business leaders. 

Kubernetes on Edge Day, held alongside ONE Summit, gathers developers and adopters to share lessons learned in building, breaking, and bettering their edge infrastructure on top of Kubernetes.

The events will feature an extensive program of 80+ talks covering the most important and timely topics across networking & edge and business & technical sessions. Conference session tracks include: Enterprise Networking & Edge, Cloud Networking & Edge, Kubernetes on Edge, The New Service Provider (Open Core, Unified Edge & Universal Access) and Business Critical & Innovation.

“This year’s ONE Summit will once again bring together industry luminaries, representing edge, core, cloud, enterprise, RAN, and more,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge, and IoT, The Linux Foundation. “With both in-person and hybrid options for attending, this year’s event promises to be even more collaborative and inspiring than ever.”

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Koby Avital, Executive Vice President of Technology Platforms, WalmartYves Bellégo, Director Network Strategy, OrangeSrini Kalapala, VP – Technology Strategy and Network Cloud, VerizonReg Orton, Chief Technology Officer, BRCKShah Rahman, Engineering Lead, FacebookPriyanka Sharma, General Manager, Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Additional keynote speakers will be announced shortly.

Conference Session Highlights:

Living the Dream: Achieving Cloud Native Network Function Deployment at the Edge – John Belamaric & Stephen Wong, Google (Enterprise Networking & Edge Track)Choosing from the Many Flavors of Edge – KubeEdge, OpenYurt, K3S, and K8S – Malini Bhandaru & Enyinna Ochulor, VMware; Yin Ding, Futurewei; Itohan Ukponmwan, Salesforce; and Fei Guo, Alibaba (Kubernetes on Edge Day)Building Modern Cloud-Native Network Services with ONAP – Ranny Haiby, Samsung; Catherine Lefèvre, AT&T; Łukasz Rajewski, Orange; Seshu Kumar, Huawei; and Byung-Woo Jun, Ericsson (The New Service Provider Track)Brewing Coffee Beyond the Edge: A Hardware Engineer’s Guide to Kubernetes – Pedro Leao da Cruz & Alex Chalkias, Canonical (Kubernetes on Edge Day)5G – Prioritizing Security Now – Brian C. Newman, Verizon (Business Critical & Innovation Track)Lessons Learned from Cloud-Native Design of Network Functions – Xuxia Zhong & Qihui Zhao, China Mobile (Cloud Networking & Edge Track)

Registration (in-person) is offered at the early price of US$950 through Aug 4. In-Person Academic and Hobbyist Passes are available for US$575 and Student Passes for US$275. Registration to attend virtually is US$50 for all attendee types.

Members of The Linux Foundation, LF Networking, LF Edge and CNCF receive a 20 percent discount off registration and can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. 

Attendees looking to attend ONE Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day and KubeCon + CloudNativeCon can register for all events through the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon registration form and add their ONE Summit registration at a discounted rate (US$599 for Corporate or US$399 for Individual or Academic).

Diversity & Need-Based Scholarships and Travel Funding
Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. We place an emphasis on funding applicants who are from historically underrepresented or untapped groups and/or those of lower socioeconomic status. To learn more and apply, click here.

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Sponsor
Open Networking & Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day is made possible thanks to our sponsors, including Diamond Sponsor: Intel, Platinum Sponsor: IBM, and Gold Sponsor: Cloud Native Computing Foundation. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team.

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. Learn more at linuxfoundation.org.

About LF Networking
LF Networking is the umbrella organization fostering collaboration and innovation across the entire open networking stack. LFN software and projects provide platforms and building blocks for Network Infrastructure and Services across Service Providers, Cloud Providers, Enterprises, Vendors, and System Integrators enabling rapid interoperability, deployment, and adoption. Learn more at lfnetworking.org.

About LF Edge
LF Edge is an umbrella organization for open source projects that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system. It fosters collaboration and innovation across a range of industry verticals, all of which stand to be transformed by edge computing. Learn more at lfedge.org.

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation
Cloud native computing empowers organizations to build and run scalable applications with an open source software stack in public, private, and hybrid clouds. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of the global technology infrastructure, including Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy. Learn more at cncf.io.

Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists (90,000 a year) join together to learn, share and collaborate in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies. Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post Keynote Speakers and Conference Schedule Announced for Open Networking & Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day 2021 appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Keynote Speakers and Conference Schedule Announced for Open Networking & Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day 2021 appeared first on Linux.com.

Success Story: Preparing for Kubernetes Certification Improves a Platform Development Engineer’s Skills

Thursday 29th of July 2021 09:00:47 PM

Faseela K. is a platform development engineer with a background in open source networking. As she saw the use of containers growing more than the VMs she was working with, she began studying Kubernetes and eventually decided to pursue a Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA). We spoke to her about her experience.

Linux Foundation: What was the experience like taking the CKA exam?

Faseela K: I was actually nervous, as this was the first online certification exam I was taking from home, so there was some uncertainty going in. Would the proctor turn up on time? Will the cloud platform where we are taking the exam get stuck? Will I be able to finish the exam on time? Those and several other such questions ran through my mind. But I turned down all my concerns, had a very smooth exam experience, and was able to finish it without any difficulties. 

LF: How did you prepare for the exam?

FK: I am a person who uses Kubernetes in my day to day work, so the topics in the syllabus were familiar to me. On top of that I did some practice tests and online courses. Preparing for the exam made so many of my day to day work related tasks much easier, and my level of expertise on K8s increased considerably.

LF: How did preparing for and taking CKA help you improve your skills?

FK: Though I work on K8s regularly, the range of concepts and capabilities I was using were minimal. Preparing for CKA helped me touch upon all areas of K8s, and the experience which I already had helped me get a complete end to end view of things. I can troubleshoot Kubernetes issues in a better way now, and go deep into each problem to find a solution.

LF: Tell us more about your current job role. What types of activities are you engaged in and how has the CKA helped with them?

FK: I currently work as a platform development engineer at Cisco, where we develop and maintain an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Troubleshooting, upgrading, networking, and system management of containerized platforms are part of our daily tasks, and CKA has helped me master all these areas with perfection. The training which I took to prepare for the CKA phenomenally transformed my perspective about Kubernetes administration, and this has helped me attain an end to end view of the product. Debugging any issues in the platform has become easier than ever, and the certification has given me even more confidence with fixing issues in a time sensitive manner.

LF: You mentioned to us previously you’d like to take the Certified Kubernetes Application Developer (CKAD) next; what appeals to you about that certification?

FK: I am planning to go deeper into containerized application development in my career, and hence CKAD was appealing to me. In fact, I already completed CKAD and became CKAD certified within less than a month of achieving my CKA certification. The confidence I gained after CKA helped me try the second one also faster.

LF: Tell us about your experience working on the OpenDaylight project. What prompted you to move from focusing on SDN to Kubernetes?

FK: I was previously a member of the Technical Steering Committee of the OpenDaylight project at The Linux Foundation, and made a lot of contributions to OpenDaylight. Working in open source has been the most amazing experience I have ever had in my life, and OpenDaylight gave me exposure to the various activities under LF Networking, while being a part of The Linux Foundation generally helped me engage with some of the top notch brains across organizations. 

Coming together from across the globe during various conferences and DDFs, and working together across the company boundaries to solve common SDN problems has given me so much satisfaction. Over a period of time, containers were gaining traction over VMs, and I wanted to get more involved with containerization and platform development, where Kubernetes looked more promising.

LF: What are your future career goals?

FK: I intend to learn more about K8s internal implementation, and also to get involved with projects like istio, servicemesh and networkservicemesh in the future. My dream is to become a cloud native software developer, who promotes containerized application development in a cloud native way.

LF: What technology are you most interested in studying next?

FK: I am currently pursuing a course on the golang programming language. I also plan to take the Certified Kubernetes Security Specialist (CKS) exam if time permits.

The post Success Story: Preparing for Kubernetes Certification Improves a Platform Development Engineer’s Skills appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post Success Story: Preparing for Kubernetes Certification Improves a Platform Development Engineer’s Skills appeared first on Linux.com.

How to create Bash scripts using external variables and embedded scripts

Thursday 29th of July 2021 08:31:15 PM

Use external variables and embedded scripts to enhance your Bash programming with interactive scripts.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post How to create Bash scripts using external variables and embedded scripts appeared first on Linux.com.

Learn the networking basics every sysadmin needs to know

Wednesday 28th of July 2021 07:55:39 PM

Networking is one of a sysadmin’s most important duties, so make sure you have the essentials covered.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post Learn the networking basics every sysadmin needs to know appeared first on Linux.com.

Announcing new event focused on Building Cybersecurity into the Software Supply Chain, August 18, Virtual

Wednesday 28th of July 2021 02:24:53 AM

Modern day supply chains leave greater potential for vulnerabilities, and supply chain security should be a high priority for organizations. Vulnerabilities could be catastrophic, and lead to unnecessary costs, inefficient delivery schedules and a loss of intellectual property. 

In addition, over the last few years, supply chains have increasingly been exposed as a major weak point in organizational security. While security may be top of mind within company walls, you are only as strong as your most vulnerable supplier.

We are excited to bring the community a new event where folks can learn directly from experts who have been working on how to solve these vulnerabilities for almost a decade, to find out how to best protect their supply chain and mitigate potential disaster.

Anyone involved in ensuring their company’s supply chain is secure including security professionals, executive leadership and tech leaders.

The event is free to attend, and will take place virtually on August 18. It is comprised of nine sessions covering all aspects of protecting the supply chain, including talks on:

Generating SBOMs for IoT at Build TimeSecuring GCC & GLIBCBuilding Signing, Distributing SPDX SBOMs as Artifact Reference TypeSoftware Supply Chain Integrity with Sigstore

View all sessions, speakers and register to attend here.

The post Announcing new event focused on Building Cybersecurity into the Software Supply Chain, August 18, Virtual appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Announcing new event focused on Building Cybersecurity into the Software Supply Chain, August 18, Virtual appeared first on Linux.com.

The Linux Foundation, Prometeo, IBM, and Partners Announce New Firefighter Safety Open Source Project

Tuesday 27th of July 2021 10:31:36 PM

Prometeo Platform S.L. is open sourcing ‘Pyrrha’ to monitor and act on firefighters’ health and safety as they battle blazes, with support from Samsung

SAN FRANCISCO — The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host Pyrrha, created and contributed by Prometeo Platform S.L., in collaboration with IBM to help accelerate the development and deployment of firefighter safety technology around the world. In 2019, Prometeo was named the winner of the Call for Code Global Challenge and since then their technology has been further developed with updated hardware and enhanced software through work with the IBM volunteer Service Corps and leading ecosystem partners.

Climate change has created more dangerous conditions for firefighters by increasing the risk and extent of wildfires around the world. From Australia’s 2020 brushfires, to record-breaking wildfires in Spain and the Western United States, fires in recent years have increased in number, severity, and destruction, while posing greater immediate and long-term health risks to firefighters who battle these blazes. According to Cal Fire, California is already experiencing a 26% increase in 2021 wildfire activity and a 58% increase in acres burned compared to 2020.

Through the Pyrrha open source project, Prometeo, the Linux Foundation, and IBM aim to accelerate innovation around firefighter health monitoring and safety. By partnering with leading companies from the Call for Code ecosystem like Samsung, the goal is to customize and scale the solution around the world in an effort to help save lives.

“Samsung and IBM have collaborated for many years to create industry leading technologies that solve challenging societal and business problems. Now we’re excited to work together to advance tech for good and help combat the effects of climate change,” said Executive Vice President of Samsung B2B Mobile KC Choi. “As a huge proponent of open source technology, we see Call for Code as a unique opportunity to deploy real world solutions based on open source technologies. We’re excited to be able to equip award-winning teams like Prometeo with resources to strengthen their solution as it is actively tested, deployed, and now made available in open source. We also look forward to increasing our own participation in Call for Code.”

The Prometeo solution was created by a nurse, a firefighter, and developers as a system that uses artificial intelligence and the internet of things to guard the safety of firefighters. Over the past two years through collaboration with Call for Code ecosystem partners, Prometeo has improved its technology across offline usage, through integration with mobile phones and watches to provided two-way alerts, and in capturing the averages of toxin exposure over time. Through field tests in Spain in early 2020 and 2021, the technology has incorporated firefighter feedback and amassed anonymized technical data to improve the solution end-to-end.

“Pyrrha is another example of the power of open source to accelerate technology innovation that can save lives,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and GM of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We are happy to support and host the development of Pyrrha and the community that is building and using it.”

“On behalf of the Prometeo team, we want to extend our deepest thanks to our many partners who have contributed to improve this solution and help protect firefighters,” said Salome Valero, co-founder of Prometeo. “We set out to create technology that would equip firefighters with personalized monitoring of their exposure to toxic substances. Through the contributions of our partners and the open source community, that dream is becoming a reality through the Pyrrha open source project.”

In addition to the Linux Foundation, IBM and Samsung, Prometeo’s ecosystem partners in the Pyrrha community include a variety of leading tech companies and institutions:

Arrow Electronics has helped improve Prometeo’s IoT devices.GRAF/Bombers de la Generalitat de Catalunya facilitated multiple rounds of field testing of  testing with Prometeo’s technology during controlled burns in Spain. The Pau Costa Foundation is helping connect Prometeo with a global community of firefighters, and exploring opportunities for further field testing.Peli has contributed their expertise in creating firefighter gear to help enhance Prometeo’s hardware.Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona has contributed lab access and technical expertise to help calibrate devices.

IBM and The Linux Foundation have a rich history of deploying projects that help drive progress in society through innovation. The winner of the 2018 Call for Code Global Challenge, Project OWL, contributed its IoT device firmware in March 2020 as the ClusterDuck Protocol. Since then, more than a dozen Call for Code deployment projects have been open sourced for communities that need them most, with solutions ranging from disaster-response, to mitigating climate change, and promoting racial justice.

The Pyrrha project community encourages new users to contribute and to deploy the software in new environments around the world. Priorities for short term updates include adapting the hardware for usage in new locations, improving the analysis of toxin exposure  over time, and further improving the mobile and smartphone capabilities. For more information, please visit: ​https://pyrrha-platform.org.

The 2021 Call for Code Global Challenge invites the world’s software developers and innovators to combat climate change with open source-powered technology. Call for Code’s diverse and like-minded global ecosystem of experts, companies, foundations, universities, and celebrities continues to expand. It includes UN World Food Programme Innovation Accelerator experts, Arrow Electronics, Black Girls Code, Caribbean Girls Hack, charity: water, Clinton Foundation, Clinton Global Initiative University, Heifer International, Ingram Micro, Intuit, Kode With Klossy, NearForm, United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, United Way, and World Institute on Disability.

For more information and to begin contributing, please visit: https://developer.ibm.com/callforcode/solutions/projects/get-started/ & https://github.com/Pyrrha-Platform

About Call for Code 
Developers have revolutionized the way people live and interact with virtually everyone and everything. Where most people see challenges, developers see possibilities. That’s why David Clark, the CEO of David Clark Cause, created Call for Code in 2018, and launched it alongside Founding Partner IBM and Charitable Partner UN Human Rights. Since then, Call for Code has scaled to include an annual University Challenge in addition to regional prizes and the creation of Call for Code for Racial Justice. This multi-year global initiative is a rallying cry to developers to use their mastery of the latest technologies to drive positive and long-lasting change across the world through code. Call for Code Global Challenge winning solutions are further developed, incubated, and deployed as sustainable open source projects to ensure they can drive positive change. To learn more about past winners and their progress, visit IBM Developer.

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. The Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Jennifer Cloer
for the Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

The post The Linux Foundation, Prometeo, IBM, and Partners Announce New Firefighter Safety Open Source Project appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post The Linux Foundation, Prometeo, IBM, and Partners Announce New Firefighter Safety Open Source Project appeared first on Linux.com.

Interested in a Cloud Computing Career? This Roadmap Can Point the Way

Tuesday 27th of July 2021 09:00:43 PM

Like many people, you might be thinking about a career in the fast growing field of cloud computing. It’s a smart move, with the Open Source Jobs Report finding that possessing cloud computing skills has the biggest impact on hiring decisions amongst technical hiring managers surveyed. And recent data have shown that job openings for cloud computing professionals have skyrocketed the last few years. 

The problem for most is determining how and where to start. If you are new to the IT sector, jumping straight into cloud and cloud native technologies is nearly impossible without first gaining an understanding of the infrastructure technologies on which the cloud is built. That’s why we’ve developed the roadmap below, outlining the knowledge and skills needed to successfully pursue a cloud career.

To start, you need to understand Linux. Over 90% of public cloud instances are running on Linux, and if you aren’t proficient in the Linux command line interface, you won’t get very far working in the cloud. You also need to understand DevOps – a term referring to the combination of development and operations which traditionally were separate in the IT space. The vast majority of organizations today use DevOps practices to deploy to the cloud, so you need to understand those practices. 

Once you’ve learned the fundamentals underpinning the cloud, you can start to learn the cloud technologies themselves. 91% of organizations running in the cloud are using Kubernetes, so it’s an ideal technology to focus on. 

To get your feet wet, you can start with some of our free courses:

Introduction to Linux
Introduction to DevOps and Site Reliability Engineering
Introduction to Cloud Infrastructure Technologies
Introduction to Kubernetes

After that, consider our Cloud Engineer Bootcamp if you want a more structured learning program, or check out our full array of cloud training and certification offerings

And don’t forget to view the Cloud Career Roadmap below for more insights!

Download full size version

The post Interested in a Cloud Computing Career? This Roadmap Can Point the Way appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The post Interested in a Cloud Computing Career? This Roadmap Can Point the Way appeared first on Linux.com.

What’s a TAM and why might you want to be one?

Tuesday 27th of July 2021 05:49:53 AM

The technical account manager (TAM) is a key customer service role in the enterprise. Here’s everything you need to know.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The post What’s a TAM and why might you want to be one? appeared first on Linux.com.

More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.16 To Bring Initial DisplayPort 2.0 Support For AMD Radeon Driver (AMDGPU)

A batch of feature updates was submitted today for DRM-Next of early feature work slated to come to the next version of the Linux kernel. AMDGPU driver feature work continues accumulating for what will become Linux 5.16 and debut as stable around the start of the new year. Most notable with today's pull request is initial enablement in this open-source AMD Radeon kernel graphics driver around DisplayPort 2.0. Since August we've been reporting on AMDGPU patches for DisplayPort 2.0, particularly around the Ultra High Bit Rate 10 (UHBR 10) support. Read more

4MLinux 37.1 released.

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