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Updated: 51 min 12 sec ago

Google Open-Sources AI for Using Tabular Data to Answer Natural Language Questions

Wednesday 27th of May 2020 01:49:30 AM

Google open-sourced Table Parser (TAPAS), a deep-learning system that can answer natural-language questions from tabular data. TAPAS was trained on 6.2 million tables extracted from Wikipedia and matches or exceeds state-of-the-art performance on several benchmarks. Co-creator Thomas Müller gave an overview of the work in a recent blog post.

Read More at InfoQ.com

The post Google Open-Sources AI for Using Tabular Data to Answer Natural Language Questions appeared first on Linux.com.

India’s contact tracing app is going open source

Wednesday 27th of May 2020 01:48:53 AM

India said it will publicly release the source code of its contact tracing app, Aarogya Setu, in a relief to privacy and security experts who have been advocating for this ever since the app launched in early April. The source code will be published on GitHub at midnight Tuesday.

Read More at TechCrunch

The post India’s contact tracing app is going open source appeared first on Linux.com.

Ex-Windows chief: Here’s why Microsoft waged war on open source

Wednesday 27th of May 2020 01:48:48 AM

Former Windows Division chief Steven Sinofsky has offered some context and a defense for Microsoft’s war on open source in the 1990s and early 2000s. The most famous quote capturing Microsoft’s previous approach to open source was from former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer.

Read More at ZDNet

The post Ex-Windows chief: Here’s why Microsoft waged war on open source appeared first on Linux.com.

Systemd Will Change How Your Linux Home Directory Works

Wednesday 27th of May 2020 01:48:43 AM

The team behind systemd want you to adopt a new way of managing home directories. Calling it a “new way” is putting it lightly—this is a real paradigm shift for Linux. Here’s everything you need to know about systemd-homed, which is likely coming to a Linux distro near you.

Read More at How-To Geek

The post Systemd Will Change How Your Linux Home Directory Works appeared first on Linux.com.

World’s First AMD-Only Linux Laptop Officially Announced

Wednesday 27th of May 2020 01:48:36 AM

TUXEDO Computers has announced the TUXEDO Book BA15, powered by an AMD Ryzen 5 3500U chip for the creation of what the company calls “the world’s first AMD-only and Linux-preinstalled laptop.” The laptop comes with integrated Radeon Vega 8 graphics and features three different memory options, all of them powered by Samsung.

Read More at Softpedia News

The post World’s First AMD-Only Linux Laptop Officially Announced appeared first on Linux.com.

YouTube for Android tests showing a recommended Google Search result when searching in YouTube

Tuesday 26th of May 2020 06:32:34 PM

Following the recent rollout of the new Bedtime Reminders feature in YouTube for Android, Google has now started testing a new feature that will show search results from the web within the app. Google appears to be rolling out this new feature for some users via a server-side update.

Read More at XDA Developershe feature was recently spotted by Reddit user u/TheMrIggs when he searched “open beer with knife” in the YouTube app.

The post YouTube for Android tests showing a recommended Google Search result when searching in YouTube appeared first on Linux.com.

Linux-creator Linus Torvalds joins Linus Sebastian of Linus Tech Tips in embracing AMD over Intel

Tuesday 26th of May 2020 06:32:32 PM

Believe it or not, yet another Linus (no, not Linus van Pelt from Peanuts) is jumping to AMD, and this time it is probably a bigger deal than Sebastian’s current change of allegiance. Linus Torvalds, the father of Linux, is no longer using an Intel CPU on his main computer.

Read More at BetaNews

The post Linux-creator Linus Torvalds joins Linus Sebastian of Linus Tech Tips in embracing AMD over Intel appeared first on Linux.com.

GNOME gets big open-source patent win

Tuesday 26th of May 2020 06:32:27 PM

In a surprise move, GNOME, makers of the popular Linux desktop of the same name, won not only a release and covenant not to be sued for any Rothschild patent but a release and covenant to any software that is released under an existing Open Source Initiative approved license.

Read More at ZDNet

The post GNOME gets big open-source patent win appeared first on Linux.com.

Raising the ground

Tuesday 26th of May 2020 06:31:17 PM

Want to create a program that displays an isometric grid receiving a file with coordinates in it? Well, Fredy Acuña from the Holberton School, a college alternative for training software engineers, is here to help you out. It is recommended to be familiar with C programming language and basics about SDL2.

Read More at Medium

The post Raising the ground appeared first on Linux.com.

Is Open Source the Way Forward for SD-WAN?

Monday 25th of May 2020 05:18:40 PM

Speaking during a recent webinar, Slaymaker joined flexiWAN Founder and CEO Amir Zmora, whose company is the first to develop and launch an open source SD-WAN platform, in discussing the state of the SD-WAN market. They specifically discussed how an open source approach can address the technology’s most pressing challenges.

Read More at SDxCentral

The post Is Open Source the Way Forward for SD-WAN? appeared first on Linux.com.

Android gets new accessibility features, including Google Assistant-powered Action Blocks

Saturday 23rd of May 2020 01:18:05 AM

For Global Accessibility Awareness Day, Google is announcing a few updates to its suite of accessibility features for Android. The biggest one is the final, public release of Action Blocks. Google is also adding features to Live Transcribe, Bluetooth support to Sound Amplify, and better navigation options to Voice Access.

Read More at The Verge

The post Android gets new accessibility features, including Google Assistant-powered Action Blocks appeared first on Linux.com.

Linux 5.8 Set To Optionally Flush The L1d Cache On Context Switch To Increase Security

Saturday 23rd of May 2020 01:18:02 AM

The Linux kernel patches that have been spearheaded by Amazon AWS engineers to optionally flush the L1 data cache on each context switch have now been queued in the x86/mm branch ahead of the upcoming Linux 5.8 kernel cycle.

Read More at Phoronix

The post Linux 5.8 Set To Optionally Flush The L1d Cache On Context Switch To Increase Security appeared first on Linux.com.

CrowdStrike Falcon bolsters Linux protection with ML prevention, custom and dynamic IoAs

Saturday 23rd of May 2020 01:17:59 AM

CrowdStrike Falcon platform is bolstering its Linux protection capabilities with additional features, including machine learning prevention, custom Indicators of Attack (IoAs) and dynamic IoAs. CrowdStrike delivers breach prevention and visibility from its cloud-delivered platform via a single lightweight agent that supports endpoints and cloud workloads on all platforms.

Read More at Help Net Security

The post CrowdStrike Falcon bolsters Linux protection with ML prevention, custom and dynamic IoAs appeared first on Linux.com.

Keeping open-source groups alive: FOSS Responders

Saturday 23rd of May 2020 01:17:57 AM

Open source is doing great, but some open-source groups are getting knocked around by the pandemic. That’s where the newly formed FOSS Responders come in. It’s actually a group of open source leaders from companies like Indeed, Facebook, Google, Red Hat, GitHub, GitLab, etc.

Read More at ZDNet

The post Keeping open-source groups alive: FOSS Responders appeared first on Linux.com.

Check Point fixes a 20-year-old Linux security issue

Saturday 23rd of May 2020 01:15:08 AM

For around two decades now, hackers have exploited the design of the memory management system used by Linux programs in order to take control of a target’s computer. Now researchers at Check Point have introduced a new security mechanism for Linux users called ‘safe-linking’ which means attackers will need more than one vulnerability in order to take over the program.

Read More at BetaNews

The post Check Point fixes a 20-year-old Linux security issue appeared first on Linux.com.

Open-source tech helps companies quickly adapt during pandemic

Friday 22nd of May 2020 01:14:35 AM

As the COVID-19 pandemic shakes the world, companies need to change to embrace remote work and increasingly online operations. One way to quickly adapt to these new dynamics is to use open-source tools, available for access from anywhere in the globe, according to SUSE’s Alan Clark.

Read More at SiliconANGLE

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How to install Ubuntu Server 20.04 with the new Live Installer

Friday 22nd of May 2020 01:14:34 AM

Ubuntu Server 20.04 (Focal Fossa) has been out for a while now. The latest release includes a new Live Installer, which provides the option to automatically update itself every time it boots. Let’s walk you through the installation of Ubuntu 20.04 with this exciting new offering from Canonical.

Read More at TechRepublic

The post How to install Ubuntu Server 20.04 with the new Live Installer appeared first on Linux.com.

A look at how Jitsi became a ‘secure’ open-source alternative to Zoom

Friday 22nd of May 2020 01:14:32 AM

Amid the video conferencing boom, Zoom’s security and privacy-related problems made a lot of people skeptical about using its products. Plus, the company wasn’t transparent about communicating its mishaps forcing a lot of people to look for free open source products, and Jitsi emerged as a perfect solution for them.

Read More at TNW

The post A look at how Jitsi became a ‘secure’ open-source alternative to Zoom appeared first on Linux.com.

Microsoft’s romance with open source software is on display at Build 2020

Friday 22nd of May 2020 01:14:31 AM

An absolute ton of new announcements has been coming out of this week’s Microsoft Build 2020 virtual conference for Windows developers. Windows Terminal has just gone 1.0. The terminal itself is open source and is available for perusal and/or hacking at Github under the MIT license.

Read More at Ars Technica

The post Microsoft’s romance with open source software is on display at Build 2020 appeared first on Linux.com.

New Training Course Advances Knowledge to Encourage Node.js Application Development Careers

Thursday 21st of May 2020 06:36:44 PM
The Linux Foundation and OpenJS Foundation have announced the release of a new training course geared toward developers who wish to master and demonstrate Node.js specialization, in particular for creating Node.js applications. Node.js Application Development provides core skills for effectively harnessing a broad range of Node.js capabilities at depth, equipping developers with rigorous foundational skills and knowledge that will translate to building any kind of Node.js application or library. Learn more at: Linux Foundation Training

The post New Training Course Advances Knowledge to Encourage Node.js Application Development Careers appeared first on Linux.com.

More in Tux Machines

NanoPi NEO3 Headless SBC Launched for $20 and up

Last month, we found out FriendlyELEC was working on NanoPi NEO3, a tiny SBC powered by Rockchip RK3328 processor and made for headless applications and networked storage thanks to Gigabit Ethernet and USB 3.0 ports, as well as a 26-pin GPIO header. At the time, the board was still been finalized, but the company has now started to take orders for $20 and up depending on options which include a cute white enclosure... [...] The Wiki has been updated as well, and the company provides both Ubuntu Core 18.04 based FriendlyCore, and OpenWrt based FriendlyWrt operating systems for the board with both relying on Linux 5.4.12 kernel. I’d also expect Armbian to eventually provide Ubuntu 20.04 and Debian 10 images. Read more

Moving (parts of) the Cling REPL in Clang

Motivation
===

Over the last decade we have developed an interactive, interpretative 
C++ (aka REPL) as part of the high-energy physics (HEP) data analysis 
project -- ROOT [1-2]. We invested a significant  effort to replace the 
CINT C++ interpreter with a newly implemented REPL based on llvm -- 
cling [3]. The cling infrastructure is a core component of the data 
analysis framework of ROOT and runs in production for approximately 5 
years.

Cling is also  a standalone tool, which has a growing community outside 
of our field. Cling’s user community includes users in finance, biology 
and in a few companies with proprietary software. For example, there is 
a xeus-cling jupyter kernel [4]. One of the major challenges we face to 
foster that community is  our cling-related patches in llvm and clang 
forks. The benefits of using the LLVM community standards for code 
reviews, release cycles and integration has been mentioned a number of 
times by our "external" users.

Last year we were awarded an NSF grant to improve cling's sustainability 
and make it a standalone tool. We thank the LLVM Foundation Board for 
supporting us with a non-binding letter of collaboration which was 
essential for getting this grant.


Background
===

Cling is a C++ interpreter built on top of clang and llvm. In a 
nutshell, it uses clang's incremental compilation facilities to process 
code chunk-by-chunk by assuming an ever-growing translation unit [5]. 
Then code is lowered into llvm IR and run by the llvm jit. Cling has 
implemented some language "extensions" such as execution statements on 
the global scope and error recovery. Cling is in the core of HEP -- it 
is heavily used during data analysis of exabytes of particle physics 
data coming from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other particle 
physics experiments.


Plans
===

The project foresees three main directions -- move parts of cling 
upstream along with the clang and llvm features that enable them; extend 
and generalize the language interoperability layer around cling; and 
extend and generalize the OpenCL/CUDA support in cling. We are at the 
early stages of the project and this email intends to be an RFC for the 
first part -- upstreaming parts of cling. Please do share your thoughts 
on the rest, too.


Moving Parts of Cling Upstream
---

Over the years we have slowly moved some patches upstream. However we 
still have around 100 patches in the clang fork. Most of them are in the 
context of extending the incremental compilation support for clang. The 
incremental compilation poses some challenges in the clang 
infrastructure. For example, we need to tune CodeGen to work with 
multiple llvm::Module instances, and finalize per each 
end-of-translation unit (we have multiple of them). Other changes 
include small adjustments in the FileManager's caching mechanism, and 
bug fixes in the SourceManager (code which can be reached mostly from 
within our setup). One conclusion we can draw from our research is that 
the clang infrastructure fits amazingly well to something which was not 
its main use case. The grand total of our diffs against clang-9 is: `62 
files changed, 1294 insertions(+), 231 deletions(-)`. Cling is currently 
being upgraded from llvm-5 to llvm-9.

A major weakness of cling's infrastructure is that it does not work with 
the clang Action infrastructure due to the lack of an 
IncrementalAction.  A possible way forward would be to implement a 
clang::IncrementalAction as a starting point. This way we should be able 
to reduce the amount of setup necessary to use the incremental 
infrastructure in clang. However, this will be a bit of a testing 
challenge -- cling lives downstream and some of the new code may be 
impossible to pick straight away and use. Building a mainline example 
tool such as clang-repl which gives us a way to test that incremental 
case or repurpose the already existing clang-interpreter may  be able to 
address the issue. The major risk of the task is avoiding code in the 
clang mainline which is untested by its HEP production environment.
There are several other types of patches to the ROOT fork of Clang, 
including ones  in the context of performance,towards  C++ modules 
support (D41416), and storage (does not have a patch yet but has an open 
projects entry and somebody working on it). These patches can be 
considered in parallel independently on the rest.

Extend and Generalize the Language Interoperability Layer Around Cling
---

HEP has extensive experience with on-demand python interoperability 
using cppyy[6], which is built around the type information provided by 
cling. Unlike tools with custom parsers such as swig and sip and tools 
built on top of C-APIs such as boost.python and pybind11, cling can 
provide information about memory management patterns (eg refcounting) 
and instantiate templates on the fly.We feel that functionality may not 
be of general interest to the llvm community but we will prepare another 
RFC and send it here later on to gather feedback.


Extend and Generalize the OpenCL/CUDA Support in Cling
---

Cling can incrementally compile CUDA code [7-8] allowing easier set up 
and enabling some interesting use cases. There are a number of planned 
improvements including talking to HIP [9] and SYCL to support more 
hardware architectures.



The primary focus of our work is to upstreaming functionality required 
to build an incremental compiler and rework cling build against vanilla 
clang and llvm. The last two points are to give the scope of the work 
which we will be doing the next 2-3 years. We will send here RFCs for 
both of them to trigger technical discussion if there is interest in 
pursuing this direction.


Collaboration
===

Open source development nowadays relies on reviewers. LLVM is no 
different and we will probably disturb a good number of people in the 
community ;)We would like to invite anybody interested in joining our 
incremental C++ activities to our open every second week calls. 
Announcements will be done via google group: compiler-research-announce 
(https://groups.google.com/g/compiler-research-announce).



Many thanks!


David & Vassil

Read more Also: Cling C++ Interpreter Looking To Upstream More Code Into LLVM

This week in KDE: New features galore!

Tons and tons of awesome new features and UI polish landed this week, alongside an equally weighty ton of important bugfixes. Read more

Elive 3.8.14 beta released

The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 3.8.14 This new version includes: Kernel updated to 5.6.14 retrowave special theme themes, designs, icons improvements and more customizations included bootup with a much more friendly graphical menu, it now remembers your last selected OS, all the options are in the same menu instead of submenus, disabled useless recovery options, improved resolution, fixed wallpaper issue on encrypted installations SWAP space is much more performant now, feedbacks welcome Read more