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Updated: 4 hours 4 min ago

ProtonVPN goes open source to build trust

Wednesday 22nd of January 2020 01:52:15 AM

Proton Technologies has announced that it is open sourcing its VPN tool, ProtonVPN. The Swiss firm says that not only is it releasing the source code for its VPN tool on all platforms, but also that it has conducted an independent security audit. Created by CERN scientists, ProtonVPN has amassed millions of users since it launched in 2017 and the decision to open source the tool gives users and security exports the opportunity to analyze the tool very closely.

[Source: BetaNews]

The post ProtonVPN goes open source to build trust appeared first on Linux.com.

Canonical Gets Into Cloud Gaming & More With Anbox Cloud For Cloud-Based Android Apps/Gaming

Wednesday 22nd of January 2020 01:52:05 AM

Canonical this morning has announced Anbox Cloud for containerized workloads using Google’s Android as the guest operating system.

Canonical is advertising Anbox Cloud for enterprises wanting to distribute Android-based applications from the cloud. Interestingly, Canonical is also using Anbox Cloud to talk up “cloud gaming” with Android games but equally so also talking up possibilities for enterprise workloads, software testing, and mobile device virtualization.

[Source: Phoronix]

The post Canonical Gets Into Cloud Gaming & More With Anbox Cloud For Cloud-Based Android Apps/Gaming appeared first on Linux.com.

Snyk raises $150 million at $1 billion valuation for AI that protects open source code

Wednesday 22nd of January 2020 01:52:02 AM

Snyk, a cybersecurity platform that helps developers find vulnerabilities in their open source applications, has raised $150 million in a round of funding led by New York-based private equity firm Stripes, with participation from Salesforce Ventures, Coatue, Tiger Global, BoldStart, Trend Forward, and Amity.

This takes Snyk’s total funding to $250 million from backers including Alphabet’s GV and Accel, including a $22 million series B round in 2018 and a $70 million follow-on round just a few months ago. A Snyk spokesperson said that the company is now worth more than $1 billion, which is at least double the $500 million it was valued at back in September.

[Source: VentureBeat]

The post Snyk raises $150 million at $1 billion valuation for AI that protects open source code appeared first on Linux.com.

13 of the best React JavaScript frameworks

Wednesday 22nd of January 2020 01:50:30 AM

React.js and React Native are popular open source platforms for developing user interfaces (UIs); both rank well for desirability and use in StackOverflow’s 2019 Developer Survey. React.js was developed by Facebook in 2011 as a JavaScript library to address the need for cross-platform, dynamic, and high-performing UIs, while React Native, which Facebook released in 2015, is used for building native applications using JavaScript.

The following are 13 of the best React JavaScript frameworks; all are open source—the first 11 (like React) are licensed under the MIT license and the latter two are licensed under Apache 2.0.

[Source: Opensource.com]

The post 13 of the best React JavaScript frameworks appeared first on Linux.com.

Why UK leaders need open technology for the disrupted future

Wednesday 22nd of January 2020 01:49:59 AM

We’re not quite past the post with Brexit, but thankfully, we have moved beyond the Brexit hiatus. And, it’s time we did. Whatever your views on the merits of Brexit, as the UK’s Prime Minister has stressed, it’s time to move on and move forward.

In fact, there may be no better time to spread the word about being open for business by highlighting the benefits of open technology. It is a task that all business leaders in the UK need to embrace. By seizing the moment to “get open done”, we can not only develop and sustain the UK’s leadership in open technology, but also carve out our status on the world stage for many years to come.

[Source: Information Age]

The post Why UK leaders need open technology for the disrupted future appeared first on Linux.com.

A Kubuntu-Powered Laptop Is Launching In 2020 For High-End KDE Computing

Wednesday 22nd of January 2020 01:48:26 AM

A Kubuntu laptop is launching soon that is aiming for a high-end Linux laptop experience atop the KDE flavor of Ubuntu. Most Ubuntu-powered laptops to date are running the official flavor, of course, with the GNOME Shell. But for those wanting a laptop shipping with the blessing of Canonical and Kubuntu Council with using Kubuntu, a new option is forthcoming via Mind Share Management. The Kubuntu Council stands to receive a “significant contribution” from each laptop sold.

This isn’t a from-scratch laptop design but based on a Clevo p960rd with alterations to improve the Linux experience. On the Kubuntu side the target is for Kubuntu 19.10 / 20.04 LTS but with some alterations around full-disk encryption, OpenVPN, making use of the Kfocus dark theme, Google Chrome, etc.

[Source: Phoronix]

The post A Kubuntu-Powered Laptop Is Launching In 2020 For High-End KDE Computing appeared first on Linux.com.

Microsoft: Application Inspector is now open source, so use it to test code security

Monday 20th of January 2020 09:05:46 PM

Microsoft has released the Microsoft Application Inspector, a cross-platform open-source command-line tool that its engineers use to quickly probe third-party open-source software components for security issues.

The static source-code analyzer aims to help developers handle potential security issues that arise through code reuse when incorporating open-source components, such as software libraries, into a project.

[Source: ZDNet]

The post Microsoft: Application Inspector is now open source, so use it to test code security appeared first on Linux.com.

AMD Zen 3 Microcode Spotted in the Linux Kernel

Monday 20th of January 2020 09:05:44 PM

AMD Zen 3 microcode has recently been spotted in the Linux kernel, months ahead of the expected launch of this new line of processors. The discovery was shared on Twitter by @KOMACHI_ENSAKA, who says the new code is linked with EDAC, or Error Detection and Correction.

By the looks of things, the Linux kernel is updated to support the AMD Family 19h processors, which represents the new Zen 3-based chip family. As the leaker notes, AMD 17h series can still be used, as they’re already supported – Family 17h is the existing AMD Zen 2 series.

[Source: Softpedia]

The post AMD Zen 3 Microcode Spotted in the Linux Kernel appeared first on Linux.com.

How to install Linux on your Chromebook

Monday 20th of January 2020 08:42:03 PM

Chromebooks can do a lot right out of the box. However, if you want just a little more, you can install Linux apps to most newer models and have access to a full catalog of desktop-class applications.

How to enable Linux
Your Chromebook already runs Linux because Chrome is its own Linux distribution, but it’s a very locked-down version without access to most Linux tools and programs by default. Luckily, turning everything on is easy.

[Source: Android Central]

The post How to install Linux on your Chromebook appeared first on Linux.com.

What are the Biggest Open Source Software Companies In the world?

Monday 20th of January 2020 08:05:24 PM

If we look at open-source, it seems the idea of creating a business model around it may seem counterintuitive. Yet, more and more startups are moving towards the open-source business model due to its freedom and the collaborative effort it provides. Plus, there can be much more value that startups can derive from providing extra services around the software product.

In this article, we take a look at the most prominent companies which focused on open source as the basis of their growth strategy and became unicorns. We can see that the trend is clear– A large number of open source unicorns are functioning in the space of analytics and real-time business intelligence.

[Source: Analytics India Magazine]

The post What are the Biggest Open Source Software Companies In the world? appeared first on Linux.com.

Meet Zorin Grid: A Slick Linux Desktop Management Tool For Schools And Businesses

Friday 17th of January 2020 08:40:52 PM

If you’re a decision maker for a business, school or organization that’s been tempted to migrate your PCs to Linux now that free support has ended for Windows 7, you’ve probably identified some pain points. Desktop Linux distributions like Zorin OS are fast, secure and feature an attractive desktop that feels familiar. But you need a solution for centrally managing, securing and monitoring those PCs. You also need cross-platform software that fills the void when you make the switch permanent. That’s exactly where the newly announced Zorin Grid plans to enter the picture later this year.

[Source: Forbes]

The post Meet Zorin Grid: A Slick Linux Desktop Management Tool For Schools And Businesses appeared first on Linux.com.

Locking and unlocking accounts on Linux systems

Friday 17th of January 2020 08:40:49 PM

If you are administering a Linux system, there will likely be times that you need to lock an account. Maybe someone is changing positions and their continued need for the account is under question; maybe there’s reason to believe that access to the account has been compromised. In any event, knowing how to lock an account and how to unlock it should it be needed again is something you need to be able to do.

One important thing to keep in mind is that there are multiple ways to lock an account, and they don’t all have the same effect. If the account user is accessing an account using public/private keys instead of a password, some commands you might use to block access to an account will not be effective.

[Source: NetworkWorld]

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Google announces end of support dates for Chrome Apps on Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome OS

Friday 17th of January 2020 08:40:47 PM

The end of support for Chrome apps has been a long time coming — Google announced more than two years ago that it was going to start winding things down.

The Chrome Web Store has already been stripped of the App section on Windows, macOS and Linux, and now Google has announced that it is to be pulled from Chrome OS too. The company has also revealed the dates on which support will be dropped completely for all platforms.

Unsurprisingly, it is Chrome OS users that will enjoy support for longer, but over the course of the next couple of years Google will be “phasing out support for Chrome Apps across all operating systems”. Later this year, no new submission will be accepted in the Chrome Web Store, and by the middle of the year Chrome Apps on Windows, macOS and Linux will no longer be supported.

[Source: betanews]

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Microsoft opens up Rust-inspired Project Verona programming language on GitHub

Friday 17th of January 2020 08:40:43 PM

Microsoft recently created a stir after revealing it was taking some ideas from the popular Rust programming language to create a new language for ‘safe infrastructure programming’ under the banner Project Verona. Matthew Parkinson, a Microsoft researcher from the Cambridge Computer Lab in the UK, detailed Project Verona for the first time in a talk late last year and promised that Microsoft would open-source the project soon.

Microsoft Research has now followed through and open-sourced Project Verona on GitHub, offering a few more details about the project and its ambitions for building safer systems through better memory management, compartmentalization, and “pervasive sandboxing”. Project Verona is also being aided by academics at Imperial College London.

[Source: ZDNet]

The post Microsoft opens up Rust-inspired Project Verona programming language on GitHub appeared first on Linux.com.

Google is Reportedly Working to Bring Steam Support to Chromebooks

Friday 17th of January 2020 08:40:21 PM

It would appear that Google is working to bring official Steam support to its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for supported Chromebook devices.

According to a report from the Android Police website, Kan Liu, director of product management for Google’s
Chrome OS, revealed the fact that Steam support could be enabled on Chrome OS in the near future by taking advantage of the implementation of support for Linux apps that landed in Chrome OS last year.

[Source: Softpedia]

The post Google is Reportedly Working to Bring Steam Support to Chromebooks appeared first on Linux.com.

Facebook Releases Open Source Speech Recognition Platform

Thursday 16th of January 2020 07:25:37 PM

Facebook has announced that it will be making its wav2letter@anywhere online speech recognition framework more readily available as an open source platform. The framework was developed by Facebook AI Research (FAIR), which claims that it has created the fastest open source automatic speech recognition (ASR) platform currently on the market.

“The system has almost three times the throughput of a well-tuned hybrid ASR baseline while also having lower latency and a better word error rate,” wrote a group of eight FAIR researchers in a recent paper.

[Source: Mobile ID World]

The post Facebook Releases Open Source Speech Recognition Platform appeared first on Linux.com.

Finance goes agile as open source checks the security box

Thursday 16th of January 2020 07:25:37 PM

It wasn’t long ago that mixing financial data and open-source software seemed like the recipe for a security disaster. But yesterday’s problems bring today’s solutions. New DevSecOps tools, such as those offered by DevOps platform GitLab, are embedding security in the workflow. Meaning that even establishment giants such as Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. are embracing new, agile methodology and joining the open-source community.

“At Northwestern Mutual, we’ve finally gotten past that curve,” said Sean Corkum (pictured, right), senior engineer at Northwestern Mutual. “Now we’re trying to make it even easier for our internal developers to participate in open source … and contribute more to the community.”

[Source: SiliconAngle]

The post Finance goes agile as open source checks the security box appeared first on Linux.com.

Top NLP Open Source Projects For Developers In 2020

Thursday 16th of January 2020 07:25:36 PM

The year 2019 was an excellent year for the developers, as almost all industry leaders open-sourced their machine learning tool kits. Open-sourcing not only help the users but also helps the tool itself as developers can contribute and add customisations that serve few complex applications. The benefit is mutual and also helps in accelerating the democratisation of ML. Take a look at few open-source NLP projects that would be exciting both for the developers as well as the users…

[Source: Analytics India Magazine]

The post Top NLP Open Source Projects For Developers In 2020 appeared first on Linux.com.

There Is Finally Open-Source Accelerated NVIDIA Turing Graphics Support

Thursday 16th of January 2020 07:25:35 PM

Here is another big feature coming for Linux 5.6: the Nouveau driver will have initial accelerated support for NVIDIA “Turing” GPUs! This is coming at long-last with NVIDIA set to release publicly the Turing firmware images needed for hardware initialization.

As of writing, NVIDIA hasn’t yet volleyed the signed firmware needed for Turing hardware initialization, but it appears advanced copies went out to Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs of Red Hat. With the firmware bits and some DRM driver hacking, Skeggs now has the Turing GPUs lighting up with the open-source driver.

[Source: Phoronix]

The post There Is Finally Open-Source Accelerated NVIDIA Turing Graphics Support appeared first on Linux.com.

PinePhone Braveheart Linux smartphone begins shipping January 17th

Thursday 16th of January 2020 07:25:34 PM

The PinePhone is an inexpensive smartphone designed to run Linux-based operating systems. Developed by the folks at Pine64, the $150 smartphone was first announced about a year ago — and this week the first units will ship.

Pine64 says it will begin shipping the PinePhone Braveheart Edition on January 17th — although it could take a few weeks for customers to receive their phones. This Braveheart edition phone is aimed at early adopters willing to tinker and test the hardware and try out various software environments.

[Source: Liliputing]

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More in Tux Machines

Lakka 2.3.2 with RetroArch 1.8.4

The Lakka team wishes everyone a happy new year and welcomes 2020 with a new update and a new tier-based releases system! This new Lakka update, 2.3.2, contains RetroArch 1.8.4 (was 1.7.2), some new cores and a handful of core updates. Read more

It is time to end the DMCA anti-circumvention exemptions process and put a stop to DRM

Although it is accurate, there's one aspect of the process that is missing from that description: the length. While the process kicks off every three years, the work that goes into fighting exemptions, whether previously granted or newly requested, has a much shorter interval. As you can see from the timeline of events from the 2018 round of the exemptions process, the process stretches on for months and months. For each exemption we have to prepare research, documents, and our comments through wave after wave of submission periods. For the 2018 exemptions round, the first announcements from the United States Copyright Office were in July of 2017, on a process that concluded in October of 2018. Fifteen months, every three years. If you do the math, that means we're fighting about 40% of the time just to ensure that exemptions we already won continue, and that new exemptions will be granted. If the timeline from the last round holds up, then we're only a few short months away from starting this whole circus back up again. Describing it as a circus seems an appropriate label for the purpose of this whole process. It's not meant to be an effective mechanism for protecting the rights of users: it's a method for eating up the time and resources of those who are fighting for justice. If we don't step up, users could lose the ability to control their own computing and software. It's like pushing a rock up a mile-long hill only to have it pushed back down again when we've barely had a chance to catch our breath. Read more

Programming With Python: PyQt5, “Effective Python” and Wing Python IDE

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  • “Effective Python” by Brett Slatkin book review

    Let’s start with the target audience for this book. I’d recommend it to the people who are using Python at least several months and are feeling good with the basics. If you need more practical advice you are definitely welcome.

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    ing version 7.2 has been released, so in the next couple Wing Tips we'll take a look at some of its new features. Wing 7.2 expands the options for automatic code reformatting to include also Black and YAPF, in addition to the previously supported autopep8. Using one of these allows you to develop nicely formatted uniform-looking code without spending time manually adjusting the layout of code.

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: System76 Serval WS, Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly and LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux

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  • FLOSS Weekly 563: Apprentice Program

    The Apprentice Program is an initiative to train and mentor female junior developers in open source, creating a pipeline of talent and changing the ratio in tech.

  • LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux | Install and Service Creation

    This video goes over the infamous LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux. You have seen it in my background and now I show how to use an old 90s screensaver scr file on Linux. I then show how to make a systemd service to activate the screensaver when you are idle for a set amount of time.