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Updated: 1 hour 5 min ago

TuxMachines: Server Administration

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 02:44:05 PM
  • 7 DBaaS Vendors You Should Conside

    Database-as-a-service (DBaaS) puts storage and management of structured data in the cloud, offering companies functionality similar to well-known relational database management systems like MySQL, SQL Server and Oracle, with the added flexibility and lower upfront costs of the cloud.

  • Webmin 1.801 Released – A Web Based System Administration Control Panel for Linux

    Webmin is an open source web based system configuration application for Linux system administration. With the help of this tool we can manage internal system configuration such as setting up user accounts, disk quotas, services configuration like Apache, DNS, PHP or MySQL, file sharing and much more. Webmin applications is based on Perl module and it uses TCP port 10000 with OpenSSL library for communicating via browser.

  • WTF is operations? #serverless
  • What is DevOps? Kris Buytaert Explains

    Kris Buytaert is known as one of the instigators of the current DevOps movement and organizer of several related conferences, including DevOpsDays and Config Management Camp. He is a long-time Linux and open source consultant who often claims that everything is a freaking DNS problem. You can find him speaking at events and consulting as the CTO (Chief Trolling Officer) at Inuits on everything from Infrastructure as Code to Continuous Delivery.

  • ​Puppet DevOps comes to the mainframe

    Without DevOps programs such as Puppet, Chef, and Ansible, the cloud wouldn't be possible. Now Puppet Labs is trying to work in systems management magic on IBM's z Systems and LinuxONE.

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TuxMachines: Android Leftovers

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 02:39:32 PM

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 02:38:32 PM
  • Seven free and open source Microsoft Excel alternatives business-users should consider in 2016

    Spreadsheets are a staple for small businesses, data analysts and marketers among others, with most opting for the convenience and familiar interface of Microsoft Excel. But there are many options out there from Google, Apache, Libre and more offering free and open source alternatives.

  • How to avoid Brandy McBrandface issues when running projects openly

    One of the most common questions I get from people interested in taking a more open, collaborative approach to building their brand and culture is "Where should we start?"

    In our work at New Kind, we often help technology companies open up their brand and culture by including employees, customers, and community members on the journey (In fact, our company purpose reads "We bring people together to share in the adventure of creating the future").

  • Elephant in the room: Doug Cutting on Hadoop and core enterprise tech going open source
  • HPE Discovers Docker, Expands Helion and OneView Platforms

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) today kicked off its Discover conference with new infrastructure offerings including an updated Helion cloud stack , OneView management platform and Docker integration.

  • Typepad Down for 5h 45min is Unacceptable; That it took 5h 40min for first acknowledgement of a problem is Unprofessional - use Wordpress instead if you start a blog

    I have to write about the Typepad total failure. Typepad runs THIS blog. I have used this blog for over 11 years and I have a paid premium account on Typepad. This blog has had over 6 million lifetime visits (thank you to all who have visited us) and my readers have left over 50,000 comments (thank you to all who contribute thoughts to the blog). While I have a formal website - www.tomiahonen.com and plenty of social media sites from Twitter to Linked In (I even have a rarely-used Facebook account) this blog is my digital home. And its always been on Typepad. Typepad is not by any means a perfect tech company, but all tech companies have their stumbles from time to time. What makes Typepad particularly relevant to this blog - the Communities Dominate blog - is that Typepad serves social media experts and providers. They are a business serving BLOGGERS. They power social media. So they are at the heart of the social media world, and they have to know its rules, and behave by it.

  • Open source and open data's role in Nepal earthquake relief

    A devastating magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on April 25, 2015, killing more than 9,000 people, injuring thousands more, and leaving an additional 3 million homeless.

    Immediately after the earthquake, the government, local and international security forces, and international aid agencies all jumped in to try to help. However, there was a lack of coordination between these groups.

  • Michigan Tech and America Makes Release Free Open Source 3D Printing Software

    Ever since it was established in 2012, America Makes, or the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, has stated that their goal was to work with the business and higher education community to develop next-level 3D printing technology. As the United States’ official 3D printing and additive manufacturing accelerator they have brought together more than 160 businesses and colleges and enabled them to collaboratively develop improvements to 3D printing technology, software, materials and processes. They have produced groundbreaking technology that has led to more metal 3D printing in aerospace applications, medical applications, electronics 3D printing and even support structure optimization algorithms. Each year membership in the organization grows, and new and more exciting developments that benefit all of the United States are made.

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TuxMachines: Development News (Python GUI , PHP framework)

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 02:35:49 PM
  • Kivy — A Cross-platform Python GUI Framework To Code Apps With Ease

    Have you ever wanted to create an app that can be used on PC, and OS X without the extra effort? What about Android and iOS? Kivy allows you do that with many additional features such as OpenGL ES rendering, custom widgets, and full multi-touch and orientation/tilt support.

  • How to choose a PHP framework

    PHP is one of the most popular programming languages around the world, and the recent PHP 7 release made this server-side programming language better and more stable than ever.

    PHP is widely used in major projects. Facebook, for example, utilizes PHP for maintaining and creating their internal systems. WordPress uses PHP to power its internals, which in return is powering more than 26% of the web. Currently, PHP powers more than 82% of websites (whose server-side programming languages the Web Technology Surveys site is able to track).

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TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 02:34:54 PM
  • WordPress plugin with 10,000+ installations being exploited in the wild

    The attacks have been under way since last Friday and are mainly being used to install porn-related spamming scripts, according to a blog post published Thursday. The underlying vulnerability in WP Mobile Detector came to light on Tuesday in this post. The plugin has since been removed from the official WordPress plugin directory. As of Wednesday, the plugin reportedly had more than 10,000 active installations, and it appears many remained active at the time this post was being prepared.

  • Bad Intel And Zero Verification Leads To LifeLock Naming Wrong Company In Suspected Security Breach

    LifeLock has never been the brightest star in the identity fraud protection constellation. Its own CEO -- with his mouth writing checks others would soon be cashing with his credentials -- expressed his trust in LifeLock's service by publishing his Social Security number, leading directly to 13 separate cases of (successful) identity theft.

    Beyond that, LifeLock was barely a lock. It didn't encrypt stored credentials and had a bad habit of ambulance-chasing reported security breaches in hopes of pressuring corporate victims into picking up a year's worth of coverage for affected customers. This culminated in the FTC ordering it to pay a $12 million fine for its deceptive advertising, scare tactics, and inability to keep its customers' ID info safe.

  • Samba 4.4.4 Fixes a Memory Leak in Share Mode Locking, Adds systemd 230 Support

    Samba 4.4 major branch was launched on March 22, 2016, and it brought support for asynchronous flush requests, several Active Directory (AD) enhancements, a GnuTLS-based backupkey implementation, multiple CTDB (Cluster Trivial Database) improvements, a WINS nsswitch module, as well as experimental SMB3 Multi-Channel support.

  • Printer security: Is your company's data really safe?

    On March 24th of this year, 59 printers at Northeastern University in Boston suddenly output white supremacist hate literature, part of a wave of spammed printer incidents reported at Northeastern and on at least a half dozen other campuses.

    This should be no surprise to anyone who understands today's printer technology. Enterprise-class printers have evolved into powerful, networked devices with the same vulnerabilities as anything else on the network. But since, unlike with personal computers, no one sits in front of them all day, the risks they introduce are too often overlooked.

    "Many printers still have default passwords, or no passwords at all, or ten are using the same password," says Michael Howard, HP's chief security advisor, speaking of what he's seen in the field. "A printer without password protection is a goldmine for a hacker. One of the breaches we often see is a man-in-the-middle attack, where they take over a printer and divert [incoming documents] to a laptop before they are printed. They can see everything the CEO is printing. So you must encrypt."

  • We Asked An Etiquette Expert About Home Security Cameras

    Roughly the size of a soda can, sitting on a bookshelf, and whirring away some 24-hours a day, a relatively innocuous gadget may be turning friends and family away from your home. The elephant in your living room is your Internet-connected security camera, a device people are increasingly using for peace of mind in their homes. But few stop to think about the effect these devices may have on house guests. Should you tell your friends, for instance, that they’re being recorded while you all watch the big game together?

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Reddit: Tabs versus Spaces

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 02:32:16 PM

Phoronix: ASRock E3V5 WS: A Linux-Friendly Skylake Xeon Motherboard For Just Over $100

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 02:21:30 PM
Last month I shared my thoughts on the ASUS E3 PRO GAMING V5 motherboard as a $140 board supporting Intel Xeon E3 v5 CPUs via the Intel C232 chipset. That motherboard was nice, but if your budget is stretched thinner, the ASRock E3V5 WS sells for a little more than $100 and works quite nicely under Linux.

Reddit: ELI5: The state of AMDGPU

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 01:55:43 PM

I am aware of the current progressing state of the open source amdgpu drivers. I researched what I could and have been following the news over the past months but I am not entirely clear on what to do to have the best possible experience for my AMD A8 7600 CPU with integrated R7 graphics and other AMD CPUs and GPUs. How best to optimize graphics performance on Ubuntu 16.04 (I am on Kubuntu)?

I tried Ubuntu 14.04 just to know the difference (on open source drivers). The performance and animations (especially for scrolling on firefox) was silky smooth. However, I cannot go back to 14.04, The packages are just so old. Kubuntu 14.04 is a no-go too for the same reason (no Plasma 4 please!). Is the situation better or worse in other distros?

So is there anything that can be done right now to improve graphics performance on 16.04? Which rendering backend should be used?

  • Xrender or OpenGL 3.1?

Anything else can be done?

submitted by /u/tinycosmicdust
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LXer: How Linux Mint saved the day for an Ubuntu 16.04 user

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 01:55:27 PM
Also in today's open source roundup: Android N won't fix Google's update problem, and how to easily install Google Earth in Ubuntu or Linux Mint.

Reddit: What's Our Next Fight?

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 01:50:19 PM

TuxMachines: The Linux Rolling Release Model

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 12:33:19 PM

Regardless of the operating system being used, we’re used to the idea that our current OS will become obsolete every few years, and a newer version will be released to replace the current one.

However, some Linux distributions have adopted a different release model. Instead of releasing a new version every year, they use a model called the “Rolling Release Model” to continuously update your operating system. This means that you only have to install your OS once and will always be running the latest version.

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TuxMachines: KDE neon User Edition 5.6 Available now

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 12:28:12 PM

KDE neon User Edition 5.6 is based on the latest version of Plasma 5.6 and intends to showcase the latest KDE technology on a stable foundation. It is a continuously updated installable image that can be used not just for exploration and testing but as the main operating system for people enthusiastic about the latest desktop software.

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TuxMachines: More MS Problems, Rosa Review, and Firefox 47

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 12:22:45 PM

Firefox 47 was released today bringing a few new features and Asa Dotzler blogged yesterday on the new approach for Firefox 48. Folks just continue to have problems with Microsoft and Windows 10. Some are so frustrated they've started a petition and asked for EFF's help. Back in Linuxville, Jack Germain suggested ReactOS as an alternative to Windows 10 and DarkDuck reviewed Rosa R7 KDE. The openSUSE ownCloud Summit has been cancelled and Doc Searls' meditation on the next big fight hit the nail right on the head.

Also: Improvements to Tabs and Video on Firefox Make Browsing Faster and Easier

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Phoronix: Qt Automotive Suite Announced

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 12:19:23 PM
The Qt Company has announced the Qt Automotive Suite, a new offering aimed at car makers building in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems...

Phoronix: KDE Neon User Edition 5.6 Released

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 12:06:36 PM
The KDE project has this morning announced the release of KDE Neon User Edition 5.6, the first major version of this OS spin showcasing the latest KDE components...

Reddit: Worth switching to Mint?

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 12:06:29 PM

With Microsoft, facebook, and google just taking over I'm seriously considering. I've used Ubuntu in the past, but I think I prefer the winxp look of Mint. I'm looking for something secure in terms of OS and even email. I might switch from gmail to tutanota, but it's java web based & does not support Thunderbird or other email clients. Lame. Does anyone know of any free email providers that is free of NSA spying and that works w/ email clients?

submitted by /u/jperk8
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LXer: Raspbian Ups Its Game

Wednesday 8th of June 2016 12:01:05 PM
Our Pi guy takes a look at the latest and greatest release of the Debian based distro Raspbian and finds much to like.

More in Tux Machines

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system. Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Not Love
    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.
  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM
    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.
  • Check out our new issue plus win an ebook bundle!
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over
    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture. And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.
  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit
    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment. The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.
  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux
    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.
  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux
    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.
  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster
    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Leftovers: OSS

  • Google and GitHub are Opening a New Window on Open Source
    Where can you find millions of open source code repositories? That would be on GitHub, of course, and with all those code repositories, one would think that analyzing them would lead to some interesting conclusions about open source in general, correct? That's the thinking behind a new offering from GitHub in partnership with Google. The two have produced a new open dataset on Google BigQuery, a low cost analytics data warehouse service in the cloud, so that anyone can get data-driven insights based on more than 2.8 million open source GitHub repositories. The move brings new data analytics capabilities to BigQuery.
  • Open Source Gospel From Cisco’s Lauren Clooney
    Companies that traditionally focused on proprietary software are now playing catch up in order to compete by utilizing open source development.
  • My condolences, you’re now the maintainer of a popular open source project
    Marc Andreessen, creator of the Netscape web browser, famously said "software is eating the world." I’d like to posit that it’s actually open source software that’s eating the world, and I have a couple of data points to back me up. First, a conclusion from the 2015 Future of Open Source survey: “Seventy-eight percent of respondents said their companies run part or all of its operations on OSS and 66 percent said their company creates software for customers built on open source. This statistic has nearly doubled since 2010.”
  • Tip: Try these open-source investigative journalism tools
    The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference took place in mid-June in New Orleans, and one of the sessions at the event looked at open-source tools for investigations. This 'Steal my tool' session highlighted a number of useful open-source investigative platforms, which Sam Berkhead, engagement editor at IJNet, listed in this article published after the conference.
  • DuckDuckGo: The Little Search Engine That Gives Back Big
    The company’s website says, “DuckDuckGo is a general purpose search engine that is intended to be your starting place when searching the Internet. Use it to get way more instant answers, way less spam and real privacy, which we believe adds up to a much better overall search experience.” [...] Proprietor Gabriel Weinberg says his once-personal project (founded in 2008) isn’t making anyone wealthy, but he and his workers live decently, and he says they’re doing well enough that giving money to open source projects doesn’t hurt their budget.
  • Understanding open source licenses
    Open source licenses are licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition — in brief, they allow software to be freely used, modified, and shared. To be approved by the Open Source Initiative (also known as the OSI), a license must go through the Open Source Initiative’s license review process. There has been an increase release of open source software from the day of Linux. Today most popular frame works like bootstrap and software such as Atom IDE used by developers are open source. We often never worry about using open source code but do you know what the license under which the frame you’re using was released means?
  • Build your own open source solar panels
    Do-it-yourself electricity generation is still difficult and expensive. The inventors of the SunZilla project aim to make it easier, cleaner, portable, quiet, and completely open source. The SunZilla system is designed to replace diesel and gasoline-powered generators for portable and emergency power: camping, events, mobile phone charging station, provide power to refugee camps, or keep the lights on during a power outage. Two people can set it up in a few minutes. It is modular and plug-and-play. Leonie Gildein is one of the five SunZilla engineers, and kindly answered some questions about the project.
  • Lessons From The Downfall Of A $150M Crowdfunded Experiment In Decentralized Governance
    Hype around blockchain has risen to an all-time high. A technology once perceived to be the realm of crypto-anarchists and drug dealers has gained increasing popular recognition for its revolutionary potential, drawing billions in venture-capital investment by the world's leading financial institutions and technology companies. Regulators, rather than treating blockchain platforms (such as Bitcoin or Ethereum) and other "distributed ledgers" merely as tools of illicit dark markets, are beginning to look at frameworks to regulate and incorporate this important technology into traditional commerce.
  • Openfunds launches global standard for fund data interchange
    The standard is published on the openfunds website and can be used by anyone free of charge.