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Updated: 30 min 23 sec ago

TuxMachines: GNOME: PipeWire and CSD Initiative

Friday 26th of January 2018 11:14:11 PM
  • An update on Pipewire – the multimedia revolution – an update

    We launched PipeWire last September with this blog entry. I thought it would be interesting for people to hear about the latest progress on what I believe is going to be a gigantic step forward for the Linux desktop. So I caught up with Pipewire creator Wim Taymans during DevConf 2018 in Brno where Wim is doing a talk about Pipewire and we discussed the current state of the code and Wim demonstrated a few of the things that PipeWire now can do.

  • PipeWire Is Making Progress But Still Needs More Time To Mature

    PipeWire was announced last year as a new Red Hat projects with aspirations to be to video as PulseAudio is to audio on the Linux desktop. Other PipeWire goals include professional audio support equal to or better than JACK, full Wayland/Flatpak support, and more. Red Hat is making a lot of progress on PipeWire, but it's not yet ready to be the default on the Linux desktop.

    Red Hat's Christian Schaller has shared a status update on PipeWire after discussing the latest state with PipeWire creator Wim Taymans.

  • Introducing the CSD Initiative

    Unless you’re one of a very lucky few, you probably use apps with title bars. In case you’ve never come across that term, title bars are the largely empty bars at the top of some application windows. They contain only the window title and a close button, and are completely separate from the window’s content. This makes them very inflexible, as they can not contain any additional UI elements, or integrate with the application window’s content.

  • The CSD Initiative Is Pushing For Apps To Abandon Title Bars In Favor Of Header Bars

    GNOME developer Tobias Bernard has announced "The CSD Initiative" in a push for more applications to support client-side decorations and as part of that to abandon boring title bars in favor of modern header bars.

    By using client-side decorations (CSD) rather than server-side decorations, applications are able to draw their own title/header bars and that makes for more interesting possibilities to save precious screen real estate and be more innovative about packing additional functionality into what otherwise would be a rather empty bar on the screen.

read more

TuxMachines: Mozilla: Firefox 59, Survey of Screen Sizes, Update About Moderators

Friday 26th of January 2018 11:09:17 PM
  • Extensions in Firefox 59

    The development team behind the WebExtensions architecture is no exception, landing a slew of new API and improvements that can now be found in Firefox 59 (just released to the Beta channel).

  • Firefox 59 Beta 6 Testday, February 2nd

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, February 2nd, we are organizing Firefox 59 Beta 6 Testday.

  • How to make a chart of your users' window sizes

    In preparation for the MDN redesign I examined our analytics to get an idea of how wide our users’ browser windows were. I wanted window widths, not screen sizes and I thought a chart would tell a more compelling story than a table.

  • An Update about Moderators, Administrators, and our new team member

    Throughout the years, we have been extremely lucky to have an amazing array of great people joining us and contributing in many various ways. There has been some spam here and there, we’ve had some people getting very emotional and unhappy about various aspects of SUMO or Mozilla, but so far we have had relatively few cases that needed Administrator investigation.

    Obviously, all that luck does not mean that interpersonal conflicts on different levels do not happen right now or will not happen in the future. We acknowledge this fact and want to be prepared for such moments, as infrequent as they are. Staying a step ahead of potential problems will help us provide you with a SUMO community experience you all can enjoy and be a part of.

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TuxMachines: Development: Languages and GNU

Friday 26th of January 2018 11:06:56 PM
  • About "dnf repomanage" performance regression

    Warning: this article can be a troll, but php is faster than python.

  • SD Times news digest: Webpack 4 beta, Android Wear SDK 2.2.0, and GCC 7.3 released

    The GNU Project and GCC developers have announced the release of GCC 7.3. GCC is the GNU Compiler Collection. This is a bug fix release as it has important fixes for regressions and bugs in GCC 7.2. It has more than 99 bugs fixed since the previous release of GCC.

  • Linux distros: love, openwashing & the thousand yard stare

    The Linux operating system (OS) will turn 30 in the year 2021.

    We know that Linus Torvalds first penned (typed) his work plans for what turned out to be Linux on a Usenet posting as follows:

    “I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like GNU) for 386(486) AT clones,” wrote Torvalds.

    No brief history of Linux is needed here, there are plenty of write ups detailing the origins of UNIX, MINIX, the birth of GNU and Richard Stallman’s creation of the GNU General Public License.

  • Glibc 2.27 Is Being Released Soon With Numerous Performance Optimizations

    Glibc 2.27 will be released as soon as next week as the latest half-year update to the GNU C Library.

    The Glibc 2.27 cycle has been very heavy on performance optimizations. As covered recently, there's been AVX2/FMA optimizations, other optimized functions, numerous FMA optimizations, and more. Long story short, if you're running a recent AMD/Intel x86_64 CPU, there are chances you could see good performance improvements out of Glibc 2.27.

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TuxMachines: OSS Leftovers

Friday 26th of January 2018 11:05:29 PM
  • Bloomberg Release Open Source “PowerfulSeal” Kubernetes-Specific Chaos Testing Tool

    t the recent KubeCon North America conference, in Austin, USA, Bloomberg presented their new open source "PowerfulSeal" tool, which enables chaos testing within Kubernetes clusters via the termination of targeted pods and underlying node infrastructure. The Kubernetes container orchestration platform is a popular choice for deploying (distributed) microservice-based applications, and practices from chaos engineering can assist with building resilient systems.

    PowerfulSeal follows the Principles of Chaos Engineering, and is inspired by the infamous Netflix Chaos Monkey. The tool allows engineers to "break things on purpose" and observe any issues caused by the introduction of various failure modes. PowerfulSeal, written in Python, is currently Kubernetes-specific and only has "cloud drivers" for managing infrastructure failure for the OpenStack platform, although a Python AbstractDriver class has been specified in order to encourage the contribution of drivers for additional cloud platforms.

  • Do the little things matter?

    In the world of free software engineering, we have lofty goals: the FSF's High Priority Project list identifies goals like private real-time communication, security and diversity in our communities. Those deploying free software in industry have equally high ambitions, ranging from self-driving cars to beating the stock market.

    Yet over and over again, we can see people taking little shortcuts and compromises. If Admiral McRaven is right, our failure to take care of little decisions, like how we choose an email provider, may be the reason those big projects, like privacy or diversity, appear to be no more than a pie-in-the-sky.

  • POSITAL Announces New Open Source Interfaces for Motor Feedback Kit Encoders [Ed: Stop characterising mere interfaces as "open source"]

    Rotary encoder specialist POSITAL has expanded its interface offerings for its magnetic Kit Encoders, launched with great success last year, with support for the non-proprietary open-source BiSS Line communication protocol. This enables the practical implementation of single-cable technology, which is becoming increasingly popular with motor and robot manufacturers. POSITAL’s easy-to-install motor feedback kits, which feature 17-bit electronic resolution, bridge the gap between simple resolvers and more complex and expensive optical encoders for servomotors, robot joints and other applications where absolute rotary position feedback is required.

  • No Boo-Boo on API validation with SmartBear

    The product is used to validate and test an Application Programming Interfaces (API) and generate its OpenAPI documentation.

    As the so-called API economy now comes into being — and exists as a defined elemental ‘thing’ inside the wider software application development universe — there is (very arguably) additional need for tools that can quantify, qualify and indeed validate and test how software developers will integrate with APIs and get them to function as intended.

  • Xiaomi needs to adhere to the rules of Android

    Most Android smartphone users understand the operating system which powers their device is “open source.” For many, that’s where their understanding ends. The legality of open source technology like Android is a mystery outside the geeky inner circle of coders and hackers who make a hobby out of tinkering with the system.

    [...]

    Here’s a brief synopsis of the ins and outs of the laws governing Android:

    Android is based on Linux, an open-source operating system. Linux is published under the General Public License (GPL), which regulates how Linux can be used, edited, and distributed.

    On top of the Linux kernel, there are lots of other components to Android. Most are also licensed under an “open source” license. The preferred license for the Android Open Source Project is the Apache Software License, Version 2.0 (“Apache 2.0”), and the majority of the Android software is licensed with Apache 2.0.

    Anyone can download and share the Linux kernel for free. If they edit the Linux code in any way, they can share that too, as long as they make the altered system available for anyone else to freely download. This is because their Linux derivative is still bound to the GPL.

    Since Android is a Linux derivative, it is thus bound by the GPL. Therefore, the Android source code must be freely available to anyone who would like to see it.

    If anyone changes the Android source code, it is also bound to the respective licenses. If that new code is then amended, it is regulated by the same license, and so on ad infinitum.

  • Siemens, GE Partner With Open-Source Innovation Community

    Siemens PLM Software and Launch Forth are partnering to empower and educate the future workforce by offering free professional CAD software to a co-creation community of 185,000 innovators that are focused on product development, idea generation, and creating solutions for challenges both big and small.

    As businesses and lines of work trend toward a global gig economy, Siemens and Launch Forth hope to enable and support the future workforce by providing them with the tools and tutorials they need to learn and grow within their career. According to Forbes, 57.3 million people make up the freelance community in the US alone.

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LXer: Open source voice assistant speaker promises user privacy

Friday 26th of January 2018 11:01:00 PM
Mycroft has Kickstarted an open source “Mycroft Mark II” smart speaker and voice assistant that runs Linux on a quad-core Xilinx SoC, and offers a 6-mic beamforming array, 10W speaker, 4-inch touchscreen, and a promise of user privacy. Mycroft launched its Kickstarter campaign for the original, voice-activated Mycroft home automation hub back in Aug...

TuxMachines: Security: 'DevOps', Linux-based SkySecure, VirusTotal, DJI

Friday 26th of January 2018 11:00:14 PM
  • DevOps and Security: How to Overcome Cultural Challenges and Transform to True DevSecOps

    Similar to the proliferation of mobile devices in the enterprise several years ago where organizations were feeling the pressure to have a mobile strategy but didn’t know where to start, we’re seeing the same situation with development methodologies. To accelerate development velocity, teams are feeling the pressure to “do DevOps,” and when integrating security, to “do DevSecOps.” But much like during the initial mobile wave, many companies say they’re implementing these methodologies, and might even think they are, but in reality, they’re not. Yet.

  • What does DevOps do in 2018?

    In 2018, we’re expecting DevOps to become the new norm for larger enterprise teams. This is because we’re likely to see developers on older, higher value systems implementing a more DevOps centric approach, having seen it work on projects that have traditionally been highly visible, but low value.

  • Cisco Acquires Skyport as Cyber-Security Investments Continue

    January 2018 has emerged to become a banner month for cyber-security acquisitions, with at least 10 acquisitions announced so far, four of which were announced between Jan. 22 and 25. Cisco continued the trend on Jan. 24 by announcing its intention to acquire privately-held server security startup Skyport.

    Financial terms of Cisco's Skyport acquisition are not being publicly disclosed. A Cisco spokesperson told eWEEK that the deal is expected to close in Cisco's 2018 fiscal third quarter. However,  a Cisco spokesperson said the company doesn't plan to continue marketing the existing Skyport System server security products.

    [...]

    It's the Linux-based SkySecure Server platform tied into the SkySecure Center service that further validates the integrity of firmware, BIOS, software and cryptography.

  • S for Security is Google owner Alphabet's new favorite letter

    The business will be the new home of VirusTotal, which Google acquired in 2012. Chronicle’s other story will be “a new cybersecurity intelligence and analytics platform that we hope can help enterprises better manage and understand their own security-related data.”

  • Github shrugs off drone maker DJI's crypto key DMCA takedown effort

    Github rejected a DMCA takedown request from Chinese drone-maker DJI after someone forked source code left in the open by a naughty DJI developer, The Register can reveal.

    This included AES keys permitting decryption of flight control firmware, which could allow drone fliers with technical skills to remove geofencing from the flight control software: this software prevents DJI drones from flying in certain areas such as the approach paths for airports, or near government buildings deemed to be sensitive.

    Though the released key is not for the latest firmware version, The Register has seen evidence (detailed below) that drone hackers are already incorporating it in modified firmware available for anyone to download and flash to their drones.

    DJI declined to comment for this article. Github ignored The Register's invitation to comment.

    [...]

    The code was forked by drone researcher Kevin Finisterre, who submitted a successful rebuttal to the takedown request on the grounds that Github's terms and conditions explicitly permit forking of public repos.

    "DJI mistakenly marked code repositories as public subsequently granting license for anyone to fork said repos. This accident can be evidenced by their press release," wrote Finisterre, linking to a DJI statement.

read more

LinuxToday: Use Glances to Monitor Remote Linux in Web Server Mode

Friday 26th of January 2018 10:00:00 PM

Tecmint: Glances is a free open source, modern, cross-platform, real-time top and htop like system monitoring tool.

LXer: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 is ready for testing

Friday 26th of January 2018 09:35:14 PM
The more secure Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 is now out in beta.

Reddit: What methods do you use to select software for a task?

Friday 26th of January 2018 08:59:30 PM

I asked a similar question here. If given, say, a list of 100 different programs for a task you need to do, how do you select one?

The reason why I'm reposting here is because the answers that I've gotten are Windows specific, and don't touch upon many aspects of software, such as license, which I'd expect to see moreso from Linux users.

submitted by /u/ThatReallyFlyKid
[link] [comments]

Reddit: Ubuntu Linux Server Basics | Udemy

Friday 26th of January 2018 08:35:31 PM

LXer: Running a Python application on Kubernetes

Friday 26th of January 2018 08:20:54 PM
Kubernetes is an open source platform that offers deployment, maintenance, and scaling features. It simplifies management of containerized Python applications while providing portability, extensibility, and self-healing capabilities.Whether your Python applications are simple or more complex, Kubernetes lets you efficiently deploy and scale them, seamlessly rolling out new features while limiting resources to only those required.In this article, I will describe the process of deploying a simple Python application to Kubernetes, including:read more

Reddit: SELinux Game · Learn SELinux By Doing

Friday 26th of January 2018 08:20:43 PM

Phoronix: Linux 3.17 To 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks On Intel Gulftown & Haswell

Friday 26th of January 2018 08:17:48 PM
Here is a look at how the Linux kernel performance has evolved since the release of Linux 3.17 in October 2014. With all the major kernel releases over the past 3+ years, here is how the performance compares using two very different Intel Gulftown and Haswell systems.

Reddit: How to send an 'E-mail' - Database - 1984

Friday 26th of January 2018 08:17:02 PM

TuxMachines: Games: Steam, Steam UI, SteamOS and More

Friday 26th of January 2018 08:00:08 PM
  • Steam for Linux Client Finally Receives Support for 4K Monitors

    Valve released today a new Steam Client Beta update for all supported platforms adding a few HiDPI improvements for both Windows and Linux systems.

    Steam Client always looked bad on high-res monitors, with small text and graphics, but it would appear that Valve finally decided to address these issues and implemented a 2X-scaling mode for Linux-based operating systems, promising high-resolution text and graphics on 4K monitors.

  • Steam UI Finally Has A Scaling Mode For HiDPI Monitors

    At the same time as adding HiDPI monitor support for Windows 10, Valve has added a "2X-scaling mode" for the Steam client to satisfy modern high resolution monitors.

    This 2X-scaling mode for the Steam Linux client supports high resolution texts and graphics when running the Steam client on 4K resolution monitors.

  • SteamOS updated & Steam Client Beta adds support for 2x scaling for those with 4K monitors and more

    Valve seem to be doing well for early 2018 when it comes to Linux, not only are they updating SteamOS more often, Linux is also getting some overdue attention with the Steam Client too.

    Firstly, SteamOS was updated again on the 15th of January to include the latest 4.14.13 Linux Kernel release. Then, they pushed the previous beta out to everyone that includes updated Mesa and NVIDIA drivers. On top of that SteamOS just got another update for security fixes to catch up with Debian 8.10. Seems like Valve are starting to get updates out quicker for SteamOS this year, which is a really healthy sign for things to come.

  • Train Station Simulator now has an alpha version available for Linux

    As promised, the developers of Train Station Simulator [Steam, Official Site] have put up a Linux alpha build for you to play around with. Of course, you do need to own it to actually test it.

  • The developers of game launcher 'Launchbox' on porting it to Linux, due to Windows 10 privacy issues

    They even did a livestream to talk about porting it. In it, the developer working on the Linux version specifically mentioned the privacy issues in Windows 10 (even though they like it) as a reason for doing this. Even with the developer stating they love Windows 10, they also made their thoughts on Linux quite clear—"It is amazing what the community has come up with here, in all these various software packages that comprise Linux, it's incredible, it's no question for a free and open source set of software Linux is absolutely incredible and amazing.". I'll be honest, that warmed my heart right up.

  • Gorgeous space sim 'Helium Rain' updated with Vulkan, skirmish battle mode and more

    Helium Rain [Steam] is a gorgeous space sim and the developers have been really supportive of Linux, this update is a real juicy one too.

    They've updated their build of Unreal Engine, which includes a new audio pipeline and support for Vulkan. If you add "-vulkan" (without quotes) as a launch option for the game on Steam, it will now use the Vulkan API. The developer says that it's a little slower right now, but for AMD GPU owners it might be more reliable.

  • Humble Monthly adds Owlboy as an early unlock, Amnesia Collection free on Humble Store

    Seems Humble have some pretty good deals going for Linux gamers right now, so let's take a little look.

  • KING Art may be doing a Kickstarter for RTS 'Iron Harvest', they're asking for feedback
  • Vulkan Continues To Show Its Gaming Strength On Low-End Hardware

    As we have shown in past benchmarks, while current generation Linux games with current Linux GPU drivers using the Vulkan API rather than OpenGL may not be significantly faster with higher-end hardware right now, the impact of this newer Khronos graphics API tends to be more profound on lower-end hardware, especially when it comes to lightening the load on the CPU. Following the recent Pentium vs. Ryzen 3 Linux gaming tests, I carried out some fresh benchmarks looking at OpenGL vs. Vulkan on the Ryzen 3 1200 quad-core CPU with NVIDIA and Radeon graphics.

read more

TuxMachines: Security: Updates, Attacking Network Protocols, Hide 'N Seek, FBI, Intel, WhatsApp

Friday 26th of January 2018 07:20:00 PM
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Attacking Network Protocols

    Most of us in the Free and Open Source software world know about Wireshark and using it to capture network traffic information. This book mentions that tool, but focuses on using a different tool that was written by the author, called CANAPE.Core. Along the way, the author calls out multiple other resources for further study. I like and appreciate that very much! This is a complex topic and even a detailed and technically complex book like this one cannot possibly cover every aspect of the topic in 300 pages. What is covered is clearly expressed, technically deep, and valuable.

  • What is Hide 'N Seek? New IoT botnet uses peer-to-peer communication to infect over 20,000 devices

    "The HNS botnet communicates in a complex and decentralized manner and uses multiple anti-tampering techniques to prevent a third party from hijacking/poisoning it," Bitdefender researchers wrote in a blog post published on Wednesday (24 January). "The bot can perform web exploitation against a series of devices via the same exploit as Reaper (CVE-2016-10401 and other vulnerabilities against networking equipment)."

  • Senator Demands FBI Director Explain His Encryption Backdoor Bullshit

    "I would like to learn more about how you arrived at and justify this ill-informed policy proposal. Please provide me with a list of the cryptographers with whom you’ve personally discussed this topic since our July 2017 meeting and specifically identify those experts who advised you that companies can feasibly design government access features into their products without weakening cybersecurity. Please provide this information by February 23, 2018."

  • Intel's plan to fix Meltdown in silicon raises more questions than answers

    Why this matters: Intel has been busy working with PC makers and OS vendors like Microsoft to release microcode that includes so-called mitigations, microcode updates that patch the vulnerabilities. But even that hasn’t gone so well: Intel advised end users to stop applying patches after systems unexpectedly rebooted. Now, Intel has revealed it’s working on a more permanent fix, but the impact on users remains unknown.

  • WhatsApp Vulnerability

read more

TuxMachines: Open source voice assistant speaker promises user privacy

Friday 26th of January 2018 07:10:07 PM

Mycroft has Kickstarted an open source “Mycroft Mark II” smart speaker and voice assistant that runs Linux on a quad-core Xilinx SoC, and offers a 6-mic beamforming array, 10W speaker, 4-inch touchscreen, and a promise of user privacy.

When Mycroft launched its Kickstarter campaign for the original, voice-activated Mycroft home automation hub back in Aug. 2015, the Amazon Echo speaker and its Alexa voice agent had made a splash, but had yet to become a household fixture, and Google had yet to launch its Google Home with its Google Assistant agent. Now, the company has returned to Kickstarter to launch a more powerful, and similarly open source hardware and software Mycroft Mark II into a market in which sales of Alexa and Google Assistant based voice activated devices are soaring along with concerns about invasions of privacy.

read more

LXer: Container testing in OpenShift with Meta-Test-Family

Friday 26th of January 2018 07:06:34 PM
The previous Magazine article on container testing showed how to use Meta-Test-Family (MTF) to validate  standalone containers. The goal is to avoid shipping containers without proper testing, and to guarantee that a given service in a container works properly. Another... Continue Reading →

TuxMachines: KDE Invites Users to Test Plasma Mobile, Releases First-Ever Dedicated ISO Image

Friday 26th of January 2018 06:59:53 PM

Last week, KDE pledged to make 2018 the year its Plasma Mobile user interface for mobile devices becomes fully a functional mobile environment and deploy it on as many devices as possible, including the upcoming Librem 5 Linux phone from Purism, which should be available in Q1 2019.

But they need community's help to test Plasma Mobile on their devices or virtual machines and report issues they might discover. As such, KDE released today the first-ever dedicated Plasma Mobile ISO image that users can download and boot on real machines or virtual ones like QEMU/KVM or Oracle's VirtualBox.

read more

More in Tux Machines

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.

FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs)

  • FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown
    Landing in FreeBSD today was the mitigation work for the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities. It's taken a few more weeks longer than most of the Linux distributions to be re-worked for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation as well as DragonFlyBSD, but with FreeBSD Revision 329462 it appears their initial fixes are in place. There is Meltdown mitigation for Intel CPUs via a KPTI implementation similar to Linux, the Kernel Page Table Isolation. There is also a PCID (Process Context Identifier) optimization for Intel Westmere CPUs and newer, just as was also done on Linux.
  • FreeBSD outlaws virtual hugs
  • AsiaBSDCon 2018 Conference Programme

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more