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Updated: 24 min 26 sec ago

LXer: 5 ways to nurture DevOps culture

Saturday 2nd of September 2017 03:24:04 AM
DevOps culture change fails without grassroots support.

Reddit: I'm about to install AntiX

Saturday 2nd of September 2017 02:11:13 AM

I've been wanting a rolling release debian so I chose this one 'cause as a bonus it doesn't use systemD. Wish me luck!

submitted by /u/Blox_man
[link] [comments]

LXer: An economically efficient model for open source software license compliance

Saturday 2nd of September 2017 01:18:16 AM
"The Compliance Industrial Complex" is a term that evokes dystopian imagery of organizations engaging in elaborate and highly expensive processes to comply with open source license terms. As life often imitates art, many organizations engage in this practice, sadly robbing them of the many benefits of the open source model. This article presents an economically efficient approach to open source software license compliance.Open source licenses generally impose three requirements on a distributor of code licensed from a third party:read more

Phoronix: Steam Linux Usage Shows A Decline For August

Saturday 2nd of September 2017 12:16:44 AM
While the Linux browser/desktop market-share rose above 3% in August, the Linux gaming marketshare made a measurable decline...

LXer: Android-driven 360-degree camera live streams 4K video

Friday 1st of September 2017 11:12:28 PM
Ricoh’s compact “Theta V” 360° camera runs Android on a Snapdragon 625, and offers WiFi, Bluetooth, and 4K imaging and live streaming. Ricoh opened preorders for its Theta V 360° camera for $429, with shipments due in September. This update to the $349 Theta S has a similar 130.6 x 45.2 x 22.9mm footprint and […]

Reddit: Wine 2.16 released

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:38:16 PM

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:31:29 PM
  • Linux Journal September 2017
  • NetMarketShare: Linux doubles market share since December 2015 [Ed: This according to a Microsoft-connected firm]

    According to the latest stats on NetMarketShare, Linux now accounts for 3.37% of the operating system market. It has more than doubled its share since December 2015 and has seen a drastic rise over the last couple of summer months. Since 2015, Windows has largely stayed around the 90% mark while macOS has dropped from a high of 8% in October 2015 down to 5.94% in August.

    NetMarketShare’s stats include data on Windows, macOS, Linux, FreeBSD and OpenBSD; it’s presumed that Chrome OS factors into the Linux statistics because it runs the Linux kernel. Suppose that Chrome OS is included, this would explain why there has been such a bump for Linux in the month of August: It’s probably due to students or schools buying Chromebooks in time for the school year.

  • FLOSS Weekly 448: Hiawatha Web Server
  • It Doesn't Look Like A Ryzen/EPYC Thermal Driver Will Make It For Linux 4.14

    While the Ryzen CPUs have been available for a few months now and the higher-wattage Threadripper and EPYC processors are now available too, the Linux thermal driver remains missing in action and it's looking less likely that it will materialize for Linux 4.14.

    The Linux 4.14 merge window should open this weekend, unless the Linux 4.13 cycle is unexpectedly stretched by an additional week.

  • Realtek RTL8822BE Support Coming To Linux 4.14

    For those with a system containing the new Realtek RTL8822BE wireless chipset, initial support for it will be found with the upcoming Linux 4.14 LTS kernel.

    The RTL8822BE is a new ASIC from Realtek supporting 802.11ac, MU-MIMO, and Bluetooth 4.1. There are USB and PCI Express versions of this wireless adapter.

  • GNOME 3.26 Removes the Legacy System Tray — But Will You Miss It?

    GNOME 3.26 removes the legacy tray area still used by some desktops apps. We ask whether this decision is really as big of a deal as it sounds.

  • Prepare For Firefox +57 With These 10 Web Extensions

    Mozilla Firefox browser is moving to “web extensions” and is dropping support for the legacy XPCOM & XUL add-ons. This means that every single add-on you have on your browser won’t work with Firefox +57 unless it was rewritten using this new technology.

    This is bad news for a lot of us. Thousands of add-ons won’t be used anymore because of this. A lot of developers do not plan to invest more time in porting their add-ons into the new technology. However, things have to move on. Mozilla’s point of view is that it’s time to drop this legacy technology and move into more modern ways of creating add-ons.

  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.4.1 “fresh” and LibreOffice 5.3.6 “still”

    The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.1, the first minor release of the new LibreOffice 5.4 family, which was announced in early August, and LibreOffice 5.3.6, the sixth release of the mature LibreOffice 5.3 family, which was announced in January 2017.

    LibreOffice 5.4.1 represents the bleeding edge in term of features, and as such is targeted at technology enthusiasts and early adopters, while LibreOffice 5.3.6 is targeted at conservative users and enterprise deployments.

read more

TuxMachines: Devices: Robotnik Utaite, PiCluster, Tizen and Stringify

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:30:00 PM
  • Robotnik Utaite – A modern Singing Computer

    Hatsune Miku is now 10 years old, but I do not use the Vocaloid Software,
    because it is non-free. It’s note editor that is not fully accessibile.
    The other Singing Computer from Milan Zamazal is no longer maintained
    and only supports English and Czech languages and singing-mode.scm is broken
    in modern distributions of GNU/Linux.

  • Introducing PiCluster 2.1

    PiCluster provides a simple approach to managing Docker containers across multiple hosts. I am pleased to announce PiCluster 2.1! This release contains many improvements and new features to the 2.x branch. Let’s dive into what is new!

  • Samsung QLED TV compatibility with Steam Link announced at IFA 2017

    Steam Link compatibility with Samsung QLED TV is not new and this is probably why its official announcement at IFA 2017 in Berlin didn’t cause a media frenzy. With Steam Link, game streaming can now be done directly on the Samsung QLED TV. A few weeks ago, there were some challenges in its usage while still in beta but Samsung has tackled all these hassles before it was officially announced today.

  • Hancom Office and Office Viewer get an update

    One of the first office document editing apps in the Tizen Store were the hancom office apps. The developers have now released two apps from their development: one is Hancom Office Viewer that comes preloaded on all Tizen Smartphones and another one is Hancom Office Editor, which is available on Tizen Store for all Tizen Smartphones. Best app for view and edit any document, pdf, excel etc. type files. Totally supports Microsoft Office documents: .doc / .docx / .txt / .rtf / .dot / .dotx; Spreadsheet: .xls / .xlsx / .csv / .xlt / .xltx; Presentation: .ppt / .pptx / .pot / .potx / .ppsx / .pps; PDF: .pdf.

  • If Not This Then Stringify

read more

TuxMachines: Debian and Ubuntu: Free Software Activities and Artful Aardvark Development

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:27:52 PM

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TuxMachines: Games: Creative Assembly, Songbringer, War Thunder, Innerspace, Studio Wildcard, spaceBOUND, TINY METAL

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:21:36 PM

read more

TuxMachines: Wine 2.16

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:19:42 PM
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.16 is now available.

  • Wine 2.16 Released

    Wine 2.16 is now available as the latest bi-weekly development release for running Windows games and applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    Wine 2.16 introduces support for pasting metafiles in RichEdit, better support for grayscale PNGs, support for safety features in library loading, better handling of GdiPlus transforms, DirectWrite rendering improvements, and 19 known bug fixes.

  • Wine 2.16 released with various improvements

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TuxMachines: Events leftovers

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:15:10 PM

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TuxMachines: OSS: OpenStack, Voting, EEE, and Genomic Open-source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII)

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:13:58 PM
  • Six strategies for scaling an open source community

    Lately, I have been revising some of the OpenStack community’s processes to make them more sustainable. As we grew over the last seven years to have more than 2,000 individual contributors to the current release, some practices that worked when they were implemented have begun causing trouble for us now that our community is changing in different ways. My goal in reviewing those practices is to find ways to eliminate the challenges. OpenStack is developed by a collection of project teams, most of which focus on a feature-related area, such as block storage or networking. The areas where we have most needed to change intersect with all of those teams, such as release management and documentation. Although the teams responsible for those tasks have tended to be small, their members have been active and dedicated. At times that dedication has masked the near-heroic level of effort they were making to keep up with the work load. When someone is overloaded in a corporate environment, where tasks are assigned and the performance and workload of team members are reviewed regularly, the employee can appeal to management for help. The solution may be to hire or assign new contributors, change the project schedule, or to make a short term trade-off that incurs technical debt. However, open source projects are largely driven by volunteers, so assigning people to work on a task isn’t an option. Even in a sponsor-driven community such as OpenStack, where many contributors are being paid to work on the project overall, sponsors typically give a relatively narrow mandate for the way their contributors can spend their time. Changing the project schedule is always an option, but if there are no volunteers for a task today, there is no guarantee volunteers will appear tomorrow, so it may not help. We must use a different approach to eliminate the need for heroic effort.

  • Open source or proprietary: how should we secure voting systems?

    The stakes are always high when it comes to software security, which is why the ongoing debate over open-source vs. proprietary tends to be passionate.

    But the stakes rise to a new level when it comes to the security (and integrity) of a nation’s voting systems. Which makes a recent, relatively civil, squabble over the topic – 15 months out from the next national US election – both passionate and significant.

    There isn’t much debate that something needs to be done to make voting systems – more than 8,000 jurisdictions in the 50 states – more secure.

    While the US intelligence community concluded that Russian hackers were “probably unsuccessful” in tampering with votes in last year’s presidential election, that doesn’t mean they didn’t try, or that their chances of future success are low.

  • Windows 10: New feature sees Microsoft blur the line between Windows and Linux [Ed: It's called "embrace and extend". And there's a third E after that: extinguish.]
  • Open-source genomic platform could aid plant breeding in developing nations

    The Genomic Open-source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII), a global project funded by an $18.5 million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, is helping bridge the gap [between crop breeders and the growing populations they feed in developing countries]. The project – a partnership between an Ithaca-based hub of researchers at The Institute of Biotechnology, Cornell and the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) and other hubs in agricultural research centers in Mexico, India and Philippines – is making state-of-the-art genomic breeding techniques available to everyone. In May, GOBII released its first products, which include a data management system to organize and access huge amounts of genomic information, and user interface tools for efficient breeding.

    “The purpose of the project is to help transform breeding programs in the developing world by implementing the most current methods being used by all major ag-tech companies around the world,” said Liz Jones, GOBII director. “

  • Big Ag Gets Ag-Gag Envy, Helps Bring In 'Seed-Preemption' Laws Across The US

        

    Supporters of the move claim that a system of local seed rules would be complicated to navigate. That's a fair point, but it's hard to believe Big Ag really cares about farmers that much.

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TuxMachines: Programming: Fastify, DevOps Buzzword, Python, LLVM, PHP and RcppAnnoy

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:10:28 PM
  • Introducing Fastify, a Speedy Node.js Web Framework

    Why have we written yet another web framework for Node.js? I am committed to making the Node.js platform faster, more stable and more scalable. In 2016, myself and David Mark Clements started Pino, which was designed to be the fastest logger for Node.js, and it now has four active maintainers and an ecosystem of hundreds of modules.

    Fastify is a new web framework inspired by Hapi, Restify and Express. Fastify is built as a general-purpose web framework, but it shines when building extremely fast HTTP APIs that use JSON as the data format. These are extremely common in both web and mobile software architectures, so Fastify could improve the throughput of the majority of applications.

  • The evolution of DevOps [Ed: DevOps is just a buzzword]

    A few years ago, I wrote that DevOps is the movement that doesn't want to be defined.

  • Why Python is a crucial part of the DevOps toolchain

    DevOps is built for agility and handling change. In this year’s Skill Up survey, Packt found that Python is one of the primary languages used by DevOps engineers. In this article, Richard Gall explores why Python is such a popular part of the DevOps toolchain.

    DevOps is a way of thinking; it’s an approach, not a specific set of tools. And that’s all well and good – but it only gives you half the picture. If we overstate DevOps as a philosophy or a methodology, then it becomes too easy to forget that the toolchain is everything when it comes to DevOps. In fact, DevOps thinking forces you to think about your toolchain more than ever – when infrastructure becomes code, the way in which you manage it, change it is constantly.

  • Updated AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands For LLVM 6.0

    With the soon-to-be-released LLVM 5.0 there is the initial AMD Zen scheduler model for the compiler to benefit Ryzen / EPYC processors. But now already hitting the LLVM development code for LLVM 6.0 is a revised scheduler model.

  • [Fedora/Red Hat] PHP version 7.0.23 and 7.1.9
  • RcppAnnoy 0.0.9

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TuxMachines: Security: Onity, Instagram and Intel Management Engine (ME) Back Doors

Friday 1st of September 2017 10:08:45 PM
  • The Epic Crime Spree Unleashed By Onity's Ambivalence To Its Easily Hacked Hotel Locks

    Back in 2012, we wrote about Onity, the company that makes a huge percentage of the keycard hotel door locks on the market, and how laughably easy it was to hack its locks with roughly $50 of equipment. Surprisingly, Onity responded to the media coverage and complaints from its hotel customers with offers of fixes that ranged from insufficient (a piece of plastic that covered the port used to hack the door locks) to cumbersome (replacing the circuit boards on the locks entirely) and asked many of these customers to pay for these fixes to its broken product. Many of these customers wanted to sue Onity for obvious reasons, but a judge ruled against allowing a class action suit to proceed. That was our last story on the subject.

  • Site sells Instagram users’ phone and e-mail details, $10 a search

    At first glance, the Instagram security bug that was exploited to obtain celebrities' phone numbers and e-mail addresses appeared to be limited, possibly to a small number of celebrity accounts. Now a database of 10,000 credentials published online Thursday night suggests the breach is much bigger.

  • Celebs’ phone numbers and e-mail addresses exposed in active Instagram hack
  • Intel kill switch code indicates connection to NSA

    Dmitry Sklyarov, Mark Ermolov and Maxim Goryachy, security researchers for Positive Technologies, based in Framingham, Mass., found the Intel kill switch that has the ability to disable the controversial Intel Management Engine (ME).

    Experts have been wary of the Intel ME because it is an embedded subsystem on every chip that essentially functions as a separate CPU with deep access to system processes and could be active even if the system were hibernating or shut off.

read more

Reddit: Linux Desktop Market Share Crosses 3%

Friday 1st of September 2017 09:55:48 PM

LXer: Passwordless Login Using SSH Keys

Friday 1st of September 2017 09:06:40 PM
Here we look at how to generate SSH Keys and Copy them to servers to enable secure but pass-wordless login

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.