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Linux.com: Linux Lite 3: The Ideal Platform for Old Hardware and New Users

Friday 8th of July 2016 02:00:31 PM
Title: Linux Lite 3: The Ideal Platform for Old Hardware and New Users8 JulLearn more

Reddit: LWN.net Weekly Edition for June 30, 2016

Friday 8th of July 2016 01:48:38 PM

Linux.com: 3 Cutting-Edge Frameworks on Apache Mesos

Friday 8th of July 2016 01:33:47 PM

The three cutting-edge frameworks showcased in these talks from MesosCon North America demonstrate the amazing power and flexibility of Apache Mesos for solving large-scale problems.

LXer: Top 25 things to do after installing Linux Mint 18 (Sarah) to make as user friendly

Friday 8th of July 2016 01:30:58 PM
Top 25 things to do after installing Linux Mint 18 (Sarah) to make as user friendly

Reddit: How to get a Linux terminal on Android

Friday 8th of July 2016 01:03:58 PM

Phoronix: "Java Training Wheels" Joins The GNU Project

Friday 8th of July 2016 12:44:51 PM
Java Training Wheels has become the newest GNU package...

LXer: Android's full-disk encryption just got much weaker-here's why

Friday 8th of July 2016 12:16:38 PM
Privacy advocates take note: Android's full-disk encryption just got dramatically easier to defeat on devices that use chips from semiconductor maker Qualcomm, thanks to new research that reveals several methods to extract crypto keys off of a locked handset. Those methods include publicly available attack code that works against an estimated 37 percent of enterprise users.

LinuxToday: Using Blender to Edit Videos

Friday 8th of July 2016 12:00:00 PM

FOSSforce: Sometimes applications have capabilities that go beyond their primary use.

LXer: To avoid disruption, stay open

Friday 8th of July 2016 11:13:44 AM
In his book, The Open Organization, Red Hat President and CEO Jim Whitehurst recognizes Vineet Nayar, former CEO of HCL Technologies, an IT consulting company based in India. Whitehurst writes that Nayar started an internal blog called "My Problems," which featured the strategic problems Nayar was working on and solicited feedback and ideas from anyone in the company willing to share thoughts.read more

LXer: Ubuntu Linux Becomes the Preferred Operating System for Pivotal's Cloud Platform

Friday 8th of July 2016 10:10:50 AM
Canonical has announced a new partnership between them and Pivotal to collaborate on delivering a cloud native platform based on the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system to their customers.

TuxMachines: LXLE 16.04 "Eclectica" Distro Will Be Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Beta Out Now

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:59:42 AM

It looks like the developers of the lightweight LXLE distribution are working hard on the next major update for the Lubuntu-based computer operating system, and they've just released the first Beta in the LXLE 16.04 series.

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TuxMachines: Fedora PSA, Ubuntu EOL, Positive Mint Review

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:55:09 AM

Today in Linux news Adam Williamson issued a public service announcement concerning Fedora and Skyland systems. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield said that graphical installers began the influx of the regular Linux user and Ubuntu 15.10 is approaching its end of support. My Linux Rig spoke to System76's James Blaede and The Hectic Geek said Linux Mint 18 is how a distro should be done.

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TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:34:53 AM
  • LQ Turns 16 so We Talk With Founder Jeremy Garcia

    LinuxQuestions.org (LQ) recently turned 16, which means we can sing the Chuck Berry song “Sweet Little Sixteen” to it. Even better, this means the site is old enough to drive in most states. Hot stuff! And today’s interviewee, Jeremy Garcia, is the founder and still head LQ-er. In this video, he’ll tell you how he once expected to get *maybe* 100 members, and talks about how he would (or wouldn’t) do things differently if he was starting LQ today.

  • Will Linux run well on a MacBook?

    When you think of Linux, you probably don’t think of Apple or its products. But some Linux users actually prefer to run it on Apple’s MacBook laptops. A MacBook owner recently asked if Linux would run well on his laptop, and he got some interesting responses in the Linux subreddit.

  • Kubernetes 1.3 Steps Up for Hybrid Clouds

    The Kubernetes community on Wednesday introduced Version 1.3 of its container orchestration software, with support for deploying services across multiple cloud platforms, including hybrid clouds.

    Kubernetes 1.3 improves scaling and automation, giving cloud operators the ability to scale services up and down automatically in response to application demand, while doubling the maximum number of nodes per cluster, to 2,000, says Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) Product Manager Aparna Sinha in a post on the Kubernetes blog. "Customers no longer need to think about cluster size, and can allow the underlying cluster to respond to demand," Sinha says.

  • Container Trends: Plans, Orchestration and CI – A Dataset from Bitnami

    Once again the level of manual deployment, be it either with a CI system or as a completely manual approach was very surprising, looking further into this data, we did a breakdown across the main orchestration tools, and looked at which CI tools participants are using in conjunction with the various orchestration tools.

  • uTidylib 0.3

    Several years ago I've complained about uTidylib not being maintained upstream. Since that time I've occasionally pushed some fixes to my GitHub repository with uTidylib code, but without any clear intentions to take it over.

    Time has gone and there was still no progress and I started to consider becoming upstream maintainer as well. I quickly got approval from Cory Dodt, who was the original author of this code, unfortunately he is not owner of the PyPI entry and the claim request seems to have no response (if you know how to get in touch with "cntrlr" or how to take over PyPI module please let me know).

  • GPS for Linux

    After a typically long period of deliberation, I finally decided to buy myself a proper GPS tracker for recording my MTB rides. I have had a GPS tracker/mapper on my phone for some time now, but with the possibility for ranging further a field on a potential bike-packing trip in future, I did not want to rely on my mobile phone. I also wanted to get a wireless HRM that would work with the GPS tracker so that I could understand how hard I was working on my various routes.

  • Bluetooth LED bulbs

    The best known smart bulb setups (such as the Philips Hue and the Belkin Wemo) are based on Zigbee, a low-energy, low-bandwidth protocol that operates on various unlicensed radio bands. The problem with Zigbee is that basically no home routers or mobile devices have a Zigbee radio, so to communicate with them you need an additional device (usually called a hub or bridge) that can speak Zigbee and also hook up to your existing home network. Requests are sent to the hub (either directly if you're on the same network, or via some external control server if you're on a different network) and it sends appropriate Zigbee commands to the bulbs.

  • DIY Mobile Backup Device for Photographers

    Backup anxiety syndrome is not a real medical condition, but as a photographer, you might be familiar with the main symptom all too well: the constant worry about keeping your photos safe, especially when you are traveling. So what can you do to alleviate this debilitating condition? Besides the obvious, but far from practical, solution of lugging your laptop around as a glorified backup device, you have two options: splurge on something like WD My Passport Wireless Pro or build a backup device yourself. Going with the former option seems like a no-brainer: a simple financial transaction gives you a decent, albeit expensive, backup solution. So why bother wasting time and effort on reinventing the wheel and building a DIY backup device from scratch? Because it’s neither difficult nor time-consuming.

  • Android malware being created faster than it can be patched [Ed: This article is mixing two things: malware, which users have to actually install, and flaws that need patching]

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:33:38 AM

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:32:11 AM
  • Mouser Now Stocking the Hexiwear Open Source IoT Platform from MikroElektronika and NXP

    Mouser Electronics, Inc. is now offering Hexiwear wearable platform products from MikroElektronika. Completely open source and developed in partnership with NXP, the Hexiwear device incorporates a low-power NXP Kinetis K64 microcontroller, Bluetooth® low energy (BLE) and wireless connectivity, and six onboard sensors into a compact wearable form factor for developers who need a complete Internet of Things (IoT) toolkit. With Hexiwear’s low-power yet versatile hardware, compatible smartphone and iOS apps, and cloud connectivity, developers can prototype and build devices such as cloud-connected edge nodes, wearable devices, or complex controllers for industrial IoT applications.

  • A Discussion on Contributing to Open Source

    Are you wondering how to get involved in an open source project? Maybe this episode from the Mondern Web podcast will give you some ideas.

  • Under Mayer deal, Mozilla could walk away and still get more than $1 billion if it doesn’t like Yahoo’s buyer

    Under terms of a contract that has been seen by Recode, whoever acquires Yahoo might have to pay Mozilla annual payments of $375 million through 2019 if it does not think the buyer is one it wants to work with and walks away.

  • Mozilla's Context Graph Reimagines Browsing Experiences

    Mozilla has a way of popping up with unexpected projects that it opens up for community development, and it has now unveiled a project called the Context Graph. The effort is focused on the answer to this question: "What if web browsers were immediately useful instead of demanding input when you launched them?"

  • LibreOffice crashtesting: now 92000 documents
  • Shopware Pushes Toward Fully Open Source E-Commerce Platform
  • gdbm Switch to Git
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: July 8th

    Join the FSF and friends Friday, July 8th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

    Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

    Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

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TuxMachines: Openwashing

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:30:29 AM

TuxMachines: Nexus 6P and Galaxy S5 Mini

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:28:23 AM

In recent times there hasn’t been much potential for new features in phones. All phones have enough RAM and screen space for all common apps. While the S5 Mini has a small screen it’s not that small, I spent many years with desktop PCs that had a similar resolution. So while the S5 Mini was released a couple of years ago that doesn’t matter much for most common use. I wouldn’t want it for my main phone but for a secondary phone it’s quite good.

The Nexus 6P is a very nice phone, but apart from USB-C, the fingerprint reader, and the lack of a stylus there’s not much noticeable difference between that and the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 I was using before.

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TuxMachines: Development News

Friday 8th of July 2016 09:27:27 AM
  • [Pulp] Sprint Demo 4 — July 7, 2016
  • 10 Biggest Mistakes in Using Static Analysis

    Static analysis was introduced to the software engineering process for many important reasons. Developers use static analysis tools as part of the development and component testing process. The key aspect of static analysis is that the code (or another artifact) is not executed or run, but the tool itself is executed, and the input data to the tool provides us with the source code we are interested in. Static analysis started with compilers and derived technologies that are well established in the software development world. Each technology applicable for static analysis can choose between several alternatives, set up its own rules, and benefit from using them. What is most surprising to me is that even with a huge set of tools and possibilities, static analysis is not properly used and disregarded in most projects.

  • LiveCode Ltd.'s LiveCode

    The new features in LiveCode 8 are intended to empower a new audience of app makers. Some of these include nine pre-made widgets, 46 new extensions, the all new LiveCode Builder language, a 3.5x performance boost, Script Only stacks for better version control and working in teams, LiveCode for HTML5 and a new Feature Exchange for community funding of new features, among others.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.6.5

I'm announcing the release of the 4.6.5 kernel. All users of the 4.6 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.6.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.6.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... thanks, greg k-h Read more Also: Linux 4.4.16 Linux 3.14.74

today's leftovers

Leftovers: Software

  • The Linux Deepin File Manager Is a Thing of Beauty
    China-based Linux distro Deepin has shown off its all-new desktop file manager. And to say it's pretty is an understatement.
  • GRadio Lets You Find, Listen to Radio Stations from the Ubuntu Desktop
    Love to listen to the radio? My ol’ pal Lolly did. But let’s say you want to listen to the radio on Ubuntu. How do you do it? Well, the Ubuntu Software centre should always be the first dial you try, but you’ll need to sift through a load of static to find a decent app.
  • Reprotest 0.2 released, with virtualization support
    reprotest 0.2 is available in PyPi and should hit Debian soon. I have tested null (no container, build on the host system), schroot, and qemu, but it's likely that chroot, Linux containers (lxc/lxd), and quite possibly ssh are also working. I haven't tested the autopkgtest code on a non-Debian system, but again, it probably works. At this point, reprotest is not quite a replacement for the prebuilder script because I haven't implemented all the variations yet, but it offers better virtualization because it supports qemu, and it can build non-Debian software because it doesn't rely on pbuilder.
  • Calibre 2.63.0 eBook Converter and Viewer Adds Unicode 9.0 Support, Bugfixes
    Kovid Goyal has released yet another maintenance update for his popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software, version 2.63.0. Calibre 2.63.0 arrives two weeks after the release of the previous maintenance update, Calibre 2.62.0, which introduced support for the new Kindle Oasis ebook reader from Amazon, as well as reading and writing of EPUB 3 metadata. Unfortunately, there aren't many interesting features added in the Calibre 2.63.0 release, except for the implementation of Unicode 9.0 support in the regex engine of the Edit Book feature that lets users edit books that contain characters encoded with the recently released Unicode 9.0 standard.
  • Mozilla Delivers Improved User Experience in Firefox for iOS
    When we rolled out Firefox for iOS late last year, we got a tremendous response and millions of downloads. Lots of Firefox users were ecstatic they could use the browser they love on the iPhone or iPad they had chosen. Today, we’re thrilled to release some big improvements to Firefox for iOS. These improvements will give users more speed, flexibility and choice, three things we care deeply about.
  • LibreOffice 5.2 Is Being Released Next Wednesday
    One week from today will mark the release of LibreOffice 5.2 as the open-source office suite's latest major update. LibreOffice 5.2 features a new (optional) single toolbar mode, bookmark improvements. new Calc spreadsheet functions (including forecasting functions), support for signature descriptions, support for OOXML signature import/export, and a wealth of other updates. There are also GTK3 user-interface improvements, OpenGL rendering improvements, multi-threaded 3D rendering, faster rendering, and more.
  • Blackmagic Design Finally Introduces Fusion 8 For Linux
  • Why Microsoft’s revival of Skype for Linux is a big deal [Ed: This article is nonsense right from the headline. Web client is not Linux support. And it's spyware (centralised too).]

today's howtos