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Updated: 39 min 26 sec ago

TuxMachines: LWN at GUADEC

Sunday 28th of August 2016 06:33:14 PM
  • Flowgraphs in GTK+

    At GUADEC 2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany, Daniel "grindhold" Brendle presented his work developing a new library and widget set that will allow GTK+ applications to implement flowgraphs in a standard manner. The widget set would enable applications to provide interactive widgets for linking filters and other block-oriented components—a type of interface many applications currently need to reinvent on their own.

    Flowgraphs, Brendle explained, are a general-purpose diagramming technique that many people will recognize from textbooks and other printed matter. They show how objects, information, and signals flow through some sort of process. Biology textbooks use them to illustrate circulation in the body, technical manuals use them to show how a manufacturing process runs, and so on. In software, he said, they are most familiar as the node-and-pipe diagrams that illustrate signal processing or data filtering.

  • The GNOME Newcomers initiative

    At GUADEC 2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany, Bastien Ilsø and Carlos Soriano reported on the revamped Newcomers section of the GNOME web site. The section is intended to draw in new users and developers and help them find their way around the project as well as to help them get the necessary development environment set up to begin contributing code.

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TuxMachines: Security News

Sunday 28th of August 2016 06:32:27 PM
  • OpenSSL 1.1.0 Series Release Notes
  • Linux.PNScan Malware Brute-Forces Linux-Based Routers
  • St. Jude stock shorted on heart device hacking fears; shares drop

    The stock of pacemaker manufacturer St. Jude Medical Inc (STJ.N) fell sharply on Thursday after short-selling firm Muddy Waters said it had placed a bet that the shares would fall, claiming its implanted heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attacks.

    St. Jude, which agreed in April to sell itself for $25 billion to Abbott Laboratories (ABT.N), said the allegations were false. St Jude shares closed down 4.96 percent, the biggest one-day fall in 7 months and at a 7.4 percent discount to Abbott's takeover offer.

    Muddy Waters head Carson Block said the firm's position was motivated by research from a cyber security firm, MedSec Holdings Inc, which has a financial arrangement with Muddy Waters. MedSec asserted that St. Jude's heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attack and were a risk to patients.

  • BlackArch Linux ISO now comes with over 1,500 hacking tools

    On a move to counter distros like Kali Linux and BackBox, BlackArch has got a new ISO image that includes more than 1,500 hacking tools. The update also brings several security and software tweaks to deliver an enhanced platform for various penetration testing and security assessment activities.

    The new BlackArch Linux ISO includes an all new Linux installer and more than 100 new penetration testing and hacking tools. There is also Linux 4.7.1 to fix the bugs and compatibility issues of the previous kernel. Additionally, the BlackArch team has updated all its in-house tools and system packages as well as updated menu entries for the Openbox, Fluxbox and Awesome windows managers.

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TuxMachines: Server Administration

Sunday 28th of August 2016 06:31:54 PM
  • Big Blue Aims For The Sky With Power9

    Intel has the kind of control in the datacenter that only one vendor in the history of data processing has ever enjoyed. That other company is, of course, IBM, and Big Blue wants to take back some of the real estate it lost in the datacenters of the world in the past twenty years.

    The Power9 chip, unveiled at the Hot Chips conference this week, is the best chance the company has had to make some share gains against X86 processors since the Power4 chip came out a decade and a half ago and set IBM on the path to dominance in the RISC/Unix market.

    IBM laid out a roadmap out past 2020 for its Power family of processors back at the OpenPower Summit in early April, demonstrating its commitment the CPU market with chips that are offer a brawny alternative to CPUs and accelerators compared to the Xeon and Xeon Phi alternatives from Intel and the relatively less brawny chips from ARM server chip makers such as Applied Micro and Cavium and the expected products from AMD, Broadcom, and Qualcomm. We pondered IBM’s prospects in the datacenter in the wake of some details coming out about next year’s Power9 processors, which IBM said at the time would come in two flavors, one aimed at scale-out machines with one or two sockets and another aimed at scale up machines with NUMA architectures and lots of sockets and shared memory.

  • ARM Announces ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions: Aiming for HPC and Data Center

    Today ARM is announcing an update to their line of architecture license products. With the goal of moving ARM more into the server, the data center, and high-performance computing, the new license add-on tackles a fundamental data center and HPC issue: vector compute. ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions won’t be part of any ARM microarchitecture license today, but for the semiconductor companies that build their own cores with the instruction set, this could see ARM move up into the HPC markets. Fujitsu is the first public licensee on board, with plans to include ARM v8-A cores with SVE in the Post-K RIKEN supercomputer in 2020.

  • The Sad State of Docker

    I have always been a big fan of Docker. This is very visible if you regularly read this blog. However, I am very disappointed lately how Docker handled the 1.12 release. I like to think of version 1.12 as a great proof of concept that should not have received the amount of attention that it already received. Let’s dive deep into what I found wrong.

    First, I do not think a company should market and promote exciting new features that have not been tested well. Every time Docker makes an announcement, the news spreads like a virus to blogs and news sites all over the globe. Tech blogs will basically copy and paste the exact same procedure that Docker discussed into a new blog post as if they were creating original content. This cycle repeats over and over again and becomes annoying because I am seeing the same story a million times. What I hate most about these recent redundant articles is that the features do not work as well as what is written about them.

  • Containers debunked: DevOps, security and why containers will not replace virtual machines

    The tech industry is full of exciting trends that promise to change the face of the industry and business as we know it, but one that is gaining a huge amount of focus is containers.

    However, problems lie with the technology and threaten to root itself deep in the mythology about it, namely the misconceptions over what the technology is, what can be done with it, and the idea that they replace virtual machines.

    Lars Herrmann, GM, Integrated Solutions at Red Hat spoke to CBR about five common misconceptions, but first the benefits.

    Herrmann, said: “Containerisation can be an amazingly efficient way to do DevOps, so it’s a very practical way to get into a DevOps methodology and process inside an organisation, which is highly required in a lot of organisations because of the benefits in agility to be able to release software faster, better, and deliver more value.”

  • Rackspace Going Private after $4.3 Billion Buyout

    The company released Rackspace Private Cloud powered by Red Hat in February. Using the Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, the product helped extend Rackspace's OpenStack-as-a-service product slate.

  • SoylentNews' Folding@Home Team is Now in the Top 500 in the World

    It has only been six short months since SoylentNews' Folding@Home team was founded, and we've made a major milestone: our team is now one of the top 500 teams in the world! We've already surpassed some heavy hitters like /. and several universities, including MIT. (But now is not the time to rest on our laurels. A certain Redmond-based software producer currently occupies #442.)

    In case you aren't familiar with folding@home, it's a distributed computing project that simulates protein folding in an attempt to better understand diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's and thereby help to find a cure. To that end, SoylentNews' team has completed nearly 16,000 work units.

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TuxMachines: Games for GNU/Linux

Sunday 28th of August 2016 06:30:50 PM

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software

Sunday 28th of August 2016 06:30:16 PM
  • SDDM 0.14.0
  • Kodi v17 “Krypton” Beta 1
  • Top 10 Time Tracking Software for Linux

    Just a few days ago we were presenting software for one of the most popular mainstream Linux distribution – Ubuntu. Now let’s cover the progenitor of all free and open-source software. Its operating system was released on October 5, 1991. The creator of Linux, Linus Torvalds, was only 22 years old at that time!

    Linux is not very popular on the desktop computers (at least among regular users, software engineers, for example, prefer to work on it), but it is the leading operating system on servers, mainframe computers, and virtually all fastest supercomputers. It is also worth mentioning that without Linux there won’t be no Android as we know it now, no network routers, video game consoles, and smartwatches. We really owe a lot to Mr. Linus.

    According to Wikipedia, the development of Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free and open-source software collaboration. Its source code may be used, modified and distributed—commercially or non-commercially—by anyone under the terms of its respective licenses. Thanks to it we can use some great software like the already mentioned Ubuntu, but also Fedora, Gentoo Linux, Debian and more.

  • MPTCP v0.91 Release

    The MPTCP v0.91 release is based on the Linux Kernel Longterm Support release v4.1.x.

  • Quick Updates: Guake 0.8.7, WebTorrent Desktop 0.12.0, TLP 0.9

    Guake is a drop-down terminal emulator for GNOME (GTK2). The application is inspired from consoles in computer games, such as Quake, in which the console slides from the top of the screen when a key is pressed. In the same way, Guake can be invoked and hidden using a single key (though Guake can also automatically hide when it loses focus).

  • Switch Between Multiple Lists Of Apps Pinned To Unity Launcher With `Launcher List Indicator`
  • MATE Dock Applet Gets Unity-Like Progress Bar And Badge Support

    MATE Dock Applet is a MATE Panel applet that displays running application windows as icons. The applet features options to pin applications to the dock, supports multiple workspaces, and can be added to any MATE Panel, regardless of size and orientation.

  • AppImage – One app framework to distro them all

    Linux is highly portable. Fact. On the other hand, Linux software is the least portable technology in the world. Try running Firefox designed for Debian on Fedora. In fact, try running Firefox designed for one version of Fedora on another Fedora, perhaps a slightly older version. Godspeed, Captain Jack Sparrow.

    The fanatical rigor with which the Linux backward compatibility is maintained in the enterprise flavors, SUSE and Red Hat, is inversely proportional to all other incompatibilities that exist in the Linux space. This ain’t no news. I have most artfully elaborated on this problem in my illustrated Linux guide. But now, there’s a thing that promises to solve all these problems forever. AppImage.

  • Substance Designer 5.5 Is Here

    This version takes texture creation into the big leagues with MDL material authoring – opening up a whole new world of materials – plus Linux support, fbx camera import and support for VCA. This is a free upgrade for license holders and Substance Live subscribers, or you can get a free 30-day trial version.

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

Sunday 28th of August 2016 06:29:11 PM

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Phoronix: Direct3D 11 vs. OpenGL vs. Vulkan Radeon Benchmarks On Windows & Linux

Sunday 28th of August 2016 06:16:59 PM
Being published shortly is a large Windows vs. Linux AMD graphics driver comparison featuring an assortment of OpenGL and Vulkan games. The latest Radeon Software was obviously tested with Windows 10 while under Ubuntu Linux both the AMDGPU-PRO and fully open-source driver stacks were each tested with the cards being used: an R9 Fury and RX 480. For this article as a benefit to Phoronix Premium members is a look at the Direct3D 11 vs. OpenGL vs. Vulkan gaming performance for Dota 2 and The Talos Principle, the only two games with Windows/Linux support where we can test such combinations of renderers...

LXer: When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules

Sunday 28th of August 2016 05:59:24 PM
Are you curious about what the leading security gurus do to protect their own systems...

Reddit: So my University gave me the chance to do a 1.5~2hr talk about Free Software Help!

Sunday 28th of August 2016 04:07:46 PM

I've been a linux user and free software enthusiast for about 4-5 years so by no means a "free software expert" but in my uni there's not a lot of people who understand free software (the philosophy behind it, licences etc) even though there are some linux users, they mainly use it because windows sucks and its free as in free beer (which is cool)

So here's what i think I should cover: *Free apps you probably use but didnt know are free (vlc,chromium etc) *Free aps you didnt know existed *history of GNU and Linux *Types of licences *How to make money with free software *Companies like Mozilla, Redhat and how they make their money

The thing is, I know some stuff about the points i wanna cover but not enough. Could you recomend documentaries,books,websites for research? I have about 2 weeks to get it ready.

Side note: I've seen a couple of documentaries on the history of linux and half-read the cathedral and the bazaar and Im generaly aware of important stuff in the opensource comunity.

Thanks for reading

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Phoronix: See How Your Linux System Compares To A $300 Broadwell-EP CPU That Lacks Turbo Boost

Sunday 28th of August 2016 03:18:21 PM
As I wrote about a few days ago, I'm in the process of my first Broadwell-EP Linux build and for it I had purchased the Xeon E5-2609 v4, a CPU that costs just $300 USD and has eight physical cores while a combined TDP of just 85 Watts, but it lacks Turbo Boost and clocks up to just 1.7GHz. But how does it perform?..

LXer: How to set up quick and easy file sharing with Samba

Sunday 28th of August 2016 03:07:51 PM
If you want to use a Linux desktop or server to share files, see how simple it can be with the help of Samba.

Phoronix: LLVM Might Get An AAP Back-End (Altruistic Processor)

Sunday 28th of August 2016 02:59:22 PM
There's an active proposal to incorporate a back-end into LLVM for AAP, a processor ISA for deeply-embedded Harvard architectures...

TuxMachines: Lessons learned from using xmonad for a year

Sunday 28th of August 2016 12:44:36 PM

Last year I switched to xmonad in the strive for a configurable yet minimalist environment. So far I am pretty satisfied with it. I’ve never experienced any crashes or slowdowns related to it, works easily for most of the tasks, and supports multi monitor setup. It is highly configurable and well documented, so it’s easy and fun to customize the whole environment to suit your unique workflows.

In fact, it’s so minimal by default, that my first task was to figure out how I would use my system and configure it configure accordingly.

I think it’s great to stop sometimes and rethink our tools and processes, explore different means to solve day-to-day problems and identify what could be improved. I like tinkering and seeking new stuff in my free time anyway, so starting with a minimalistic environment was very inspiring, because it forced me to rethink even some of the basic aspects of my workflows.

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Phoronix: GCC 7 To Continue Improving Debug Messages, More Helpful Assembly Output

Sunday 28th of August 2016 12:39:54 PM
Early on LLVM's Clang compiler offered much better debugging / error messages than GCC but in the past few years the GNU Compiler Collection developers have been working on generating more helpful messages too. With GCC 7 there will will be more improvements in this space and more...

TuxMachines: 12 biggest Android smartphone launches of August

Sunday 28th of August 2016 12:36:59 PM

Planning to buy a new smartphone? How about checking out some new launches?

The month of August saw smartphone manufacturers launching some great devices in the market, including three flagship devices.

So for those of you who are in the market for a new smartphone, here are 12 of the biggest launches (so far) to make things easier.

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Phoronix: SDDM Display Manager Adds HiDPI Support, New Options

Sunday 28th of August 2016 12:22:04 PM
The Simple Desktop Display Manager has released version 0.14 of their project that's used by Hawaii, some KDE installations, and more as the login/display manager...

LXer: Great new technical guides, tutorials and documentation for OpenStack

Sunday 28th of August 2016 12:16:18 PM
The number of tools and projects which fall under the broad heading of "open source cloud" seem to grow every month. Just inside of the OpenStack umbrella, there are dozens of different projects to keep track of, all steaming ahead under a six-month release cycle.

TuxMachines: KDE/Akademy

Sunday 28th of August 2016 12:13:57 PM

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box