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Updated: 1 hour 14 min ago

Reddit: Getting more hardware vendors to support Linux

Thursday 18th of January 2018 05:35:47 PM

Hello all,

For x-mas I built myself a Ryzen 7 1700x PC with the full intention of running Linux on it (the bare metal not a VM). PC Partpicker link = https://pcpartpicker.com/user/jqpdev/saved/qRhvVn

My issue is that many of the hardware items don't have any Linux support beyond what the Linux community has created. For example, the Asus motherboard comes with a nice suite of utilities/drivers (temperature monitoring, overclocking, etc.) but they are only for Windows 10. MS announced that it will not even support Ryzen on Windows 7. I would love to have the Asus Ai Suite, Asus Real Bench (benchmarking tool), and other motherboard utilities/drivers/goodies as native Linux applications. Sure I installed Windows 10 and the utilities/drivers to verify my new hardware was working properly but that install will be wiped. I already have Manjaro KDE 17.1.1 installed and working properly on it, although I haven't tried anything fancy with the gSkill keyboard. All of my hardware was detected in Manjaro without any issues or extra effort.

I think we need the Linux community to be way more proactive in speaking up and asking for native Linux support. We can't exactly force HW vendors to give us what we want but if paying customers ask/demand/show interest it creates an opportunity for vendors to step-up and answer the call from the market of paying customers or risk losing business to their competitors.

I made a post in the Asus RoG (republic of gamers) forum asking for those juicy utilities/goodies to be ported to Linux. Link to my Asus RoG post = https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?98921-Ai-Suite-amp-other-Mobo-Utils-for-Linux-please&p=696868#post696868

Asus isn't the only vendor we need support from. Its Intel, AMD, gSkill, EVGA, Thermaltake, Corsair, Razor, etc.

What are your opinions/ideas?

submitted by /u/ghoultek
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TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Thursday 18th of January 2018 05:34:22 PM
  • Amazing Facts about Linux Operating System You Probably Don't Know [Ed: This gets some facts wrong, right from the very first sentence]

    It was almost 20 years ago when the first version of Linux came into the market and since then, this operating system has made its important stature beside Microsoft Windows. Linux has turned out to be one of the most acknowledged and extensively used operating system. Enthused by UNIX, Linux has smartly managed to attract a lot of tech giants such as Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Twitter, Amazon, and much more. However, when it comes to assessing the exact rate of adoption of Linux in the market, the task is a bit tough since the sources to get copies are wide in number. Appreciating workers' and developers' hard-work, Linux has been designed in such a way that exploring and learning things on this operating system has become quite captivating and enthralling.

    In this post, let's know more about amazing features and facts of this operating system.

  • MenuLibre 2.1.4 Released For Menu Editing On GNOME/LXDE/Xfce/Unity

    MenuLibre is an advanced menu editor that supports not just one desktop environment but GNOME, LXDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, and Unity Linux systems.

    Today's MenuLibre 2.1.4 for advanced menu editing of Linux desktop systems has a new "test launcher" option, new sorting abilities for menus, new layout preferences for desktops supporting client-side decorations, improved file handling, and many bug fixes.

  • EU Makes EUR 1B Bid to Boost Supercomputer Efforts

    The market for High-Performance Computing (HPC) has increasingly been dominated in recent years by China. Now the European Union (EU) is aiming to get back into the hunt with a new initiative called the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking.

    The goal of the EuroHPC effort is to acquire, build and deploy a world-class High-Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructure. The effort will also involve the development of application software that will run on the HPC infrastructure.

    The EU will contribute EUR 486 million, which will be matched by Member States and associated countries. According to the EU, approximately EUR 1 billion in total will be invested in the effort by 2020.

  • EasyLinux Show 18.2 | Meltdown, Spectre and Linux Mint
  • Videos on Samba shares

    A longstanding complaint about KDE Plasma is that it’s a pain in the butt to stream videos that are located on Samba shares. It’s a usability issue for sure. I’d like to talk a bit about the origins of the problem and how I helped drive a solution.

  • 3 Growth Stocks to Buy and Hold for 25 Years
  • Swing Trading Earnings Bullish Momentum With Options in Red Hat Inc
  • 10 Best Android Cleaner Apps For 2018

read more

TuxMachines: Google's Debian Move and Promotion of DRM Inside Linux

Thursday 18th of January 2018 05:32:29 PM
  • Google moves internal systems from Ubuntu to Debian

    Google has begun the process of transitioning its internal machines’ operating systems from Ubuntu to Debian after announcing last year it would make the switch.

    Google’s engineers have been using a customised version of Ubuntu called Goobuntu, naturally, for years, but according to Spanish website MuyLinux, the tech giant is now moving from a "light-skinned" distro which it has no contribution to, to gLinux, based on Debian Testing.

  • Open-Source HDCP Support Gets Extended To More Platforms

    With the Linux 4.17 kernel (not the upcoming 4.16 cycle) there is likely to be added initial HDCP support to Intel's Direct Rendering Manager driver. Ahead of that this High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection support continues getting improved upon.

    While Google developers working on Chrome/Chromium OS were the ones originally working on the patches and proposing this HDCP functionality be upstreamed into the mainline i915 DRM Linux driver, coming out today are patches from an Intel developer for extending the HDCP content protection coverage.

read more

TuxMachines: SUSE: Change of Plans and Disclosure

Thursday 18th of January 2018 05:30:11 PM
  • SUSE Dropping Mainline Work On Their In-Kernel Bootsplash System

    For those that were excited over the months of ongoing work by SUSE to bring up an in-kernel boot splash system that could be better than Plymouth for at least some use-cases and was interesting many readers, unfortunately it's not panning out for mainline.

    Max Staudt who has been leading this project has sent out his latest version of the patches today, but he's decided to drop pursuing it for mainline. The German Linux developer commented, "found that it doesn't currently make sense to continue working on the splash code, given the low practical interest I've received on LKML...I'll be happy to rebase it and continue to work on it if interest arises."

  • cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

    The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

    The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

read more

Linux.com: 4 Tools for Network Snooping on Linux

Thursday 18th of January 2018 03:33:31 PM
Title: 4 Tools for Network Snooping on Linux18 JanLearn more

TuxMachines: 4 Tools for Network Snooping on Linux

Thursday 18th of January 2018 03:21:35 PM

Computer networking data has to be exposed, because packets can't travel blindfolded, so join us as we use whois, dig, nmcli, and nmap to snoop networks.

Do be polite and don't run nmap on any network but your own, because probing other people's networks can be interpreted as a hostile act.

read more

TuxMachines: Google’s Fuchsia OS on the Pixelbook: It works! It actually works!

Thursday 18th of January 2018 03:18:41 PM

Google currently has two OSes on the market: Android and Chrome OS. The company is never one to leave a successful product alone in the marketplace, though, so it's also developing a third operating system called "Fuchsia." When we last checked in on the experimental OS in May 2017, calling it an "OS" was a bit of a stretch. We only got the system UI up and running on top of Android, where it then functioned like an app. The UI offered a neat multi-window system, but mostly it was just a bunch of placeholder graphics. Nothing worked.

It has been hard to check in on Fuchsia since. The Fuchsia system UI, which was written with a cross-platform SDK called "Flutter," quickly shut down the Android (and iOS) compatible builds. Fuchsia has a Vulkan-based graphics stack, and no emulator supports the new-ish graphics API. The only way to get Fuchsia up and running again was with actual hardware, and the only supported devices were Intel NUC PCs from 2015 and the Acer Switch Alpha 12 laptop.

read more

Phoronix: Unity Game Engine Working On Graphics Rendering Improvements For 2018

Thursday 18th of January 2018 02:49:49 PM
The Unity game engine has a New Year's resolution of improving its graphics renderer abilities in 2018...

LXer: How to create outlines in Linux with TreeLine

Thursday 18th of January 2018 02:30:36 PM
As someone who's been known to string a few words together, I know that a well-crafted outline can be a key part of any writing project. Why? A good outline helps you organize your work. It provides a structure for what you're writing as well as a roadmap from beginning to end.Outlines aren't just for writing, either. They can be a great tool for organizing just about any kind of project.read more

TuxMachines: Games: Super Blood Hockey, Starship Titanic and More

Thursday 18th of January 2018 02:09:34 PM

read more

LinuxToday: SPARTA - Network Penetration Testing GUI Toolkit

Thursday 18th of January 2018 02:00:00 PM

SPARTA is GUI application developed with python and inbuild Network Penetration Testing Kali Linux tool.

Phoronix: Ubuntu Preparing Kernel Updates With IBRS/IBPB For Spectre Mitigation

Thursday 18th of January 2018 01:25:57 PM
Canonical has rolled out Spectre Variant One and Spectre Variant Two mitigation to their proposed repository with updated kernels for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS / 16.04 LTS / 17.10. These kernels with IBRS and IBPB added in will be sent down as stable release updates next week...

Phoronix: Fedora Makes Progress On Their New Modularity Concept

Thursday 18th of January 2018 01:18:33 PM
After abandoning their Fedora Server 27 Modular Edition work last year, Fedora developers interested in modularizing Fedora packaging have drawn up new plans that are now approved by the Fedora Council...

LXer: Microsoft, Masking/Hiding Itself Behind Patent Trolls, is Still Engaging in Patent Extortion

Thursday 18th of January 2018 01:16:16 PM
A review of Microsoft's ugly tactics, which involve coercion and extortion (for businesses to move to Azure and/or for OEMs to preload Microsoft software) while Microsoft-connected patent trolls help hide the "enforcement" element in this whole racket

More in Tux Machines

PlayOnLinux For Easier Use Of Wine

PlayOnLinux is a free program that helps to install, run, and manage Windows software on Linux. It can also manage virtual C: drives (known as Wine prefixes), and download and install certain Windows libraries for getting some software to run on Wine properly. Creating different drives using different Wine versions is also possible. It is very handy because what runs well in one version may not run as well (if at all) on a newer version. There is PlayOnMac for macOS and PlayOnBSD for FreeBSD. Read
more

Linux Kernel: KPTI, SEV, CBS

  • Experimental KPTI Support For x86 32-bit Linux
    For the Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) support currently within the Linux kernel for addressing the Meltdown CPU vulnerability it's currently limited to 64-bit on the x86 side, but for the unfortunate souls still running x86 32-bit operating systems, SUSE is working on such support.
  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Is Ready To Roll With Linux 4.16
    With the Linux 4.16 kernel cycle that is expected to begin immediately following the Linux 4.15 kernel debut on Sunday, AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) technology supported by their new EPYC processors will be mainline. Going back to the end of 2016 have been Linux patches for Secure Encrypted Virtualization while with Linux 4.16 it will finally be part of the mainline kernel and supported with KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) virtualization.
  • Deadline scheduler part 2 — details and usage
    Linux’s deadline scheduler is a global early deadline first scheduler for sporadic tasks with constrained deadlines. These terms were defined in the first part of this series. In this installment, the details of the Linux deadline scheduler and how it can be used will be examined. The deadline scheduler prioritizes the tasks according to the task’s job deadline: the earliest absolute deadline first. For a system with M processors, the M earliest deadline jobs will be selected to run on the M processors. The Linux deadline scheduler also implements the constant bandwidth server (CBS) algorithm, which is a resource-reservation protocol. CBS is used to guarantee that each task will receive its full run time during every period. At every activation of a task, the CBS replenishes the task’s run time. As the job runs, it consumes that time; if the task runs out, it will be throttled and descheduled. In this case, the task will be able to run only after the next replenishment at the beginning of the next period. Therefore, CBS is used to both guarantee each task’s CPU time based on its timing requirements and to prevent a misbehaving task from running for more than its run time and causing problems to other jobs.

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

Games: DRAG, Geneshift, Balloonatics and More