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Updated: 16 min 3 sec ago

TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 10:07:07 AM
  • Conflict resolution: A primer

    People are pretty incredible. The open source community is a great example of this: hundreds and thousands of people passionate about building new things, collaborating together, and helping each other succeed. Good people deliver great results, time and time again.

    There is though, always going to be conflict. Sometimes people will disagree on ideas, on perspectives, on approaches, or ideologies. Sometimes you can’t point your finger at the source of conflict easily and it seems people just don’t get on.

    Conflict doesn’t just happen in open source projects though. It happens at work, in our families, in our groups of friends, and elsewhere. So, when you have two people who rub each other up the wrong way, how do you help to resolve it? Today I want to share some things I have learned that might help.

  • Amazon goes open source with machine-learning tech, competing with Google’s TensorFlow

    Amazon is making a bigger leap into open-source technology with the unveiling of its machine-learning software DSSTNE.

  • OPNFV’s Inaugural Plugfest Hosted by CableLabs

    OPNFVs first Plugfest was held at CableLabs facility in Louisville, CO. This event, which focused on deployment and integration of OPNFV as well as Virtual Network Function (VNF) applications, was open to both OPNFV members and non-members.

  • AtScale, Focused on BI and Hadoop, Bags Another $11 Million in Funding

    In recent months, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. Hadoop has been the driving technology behind much of the Big Data trend, and there are many administrators who can benefit from simplified dashboards and analytics tools that work with it. In fact, as we covered here, MapR's CEO predicted that IT will embrace self-service Big Data to allow developers, data scientists and data analysts to directly conduct data exploration."

  • My two cents about Jekyll

    Wordpress is mainly about WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get), but you can also go the WYSIWYW way if you prefer (What you see is what you write). In other words, you can write your posts in plain HTML, or Markdown (thanks to the Jetpack plugin). The latter is what I used to do, but the downside is a slower productivity: you need to click the Preview button to get a preview of the resulting page.

  • SourceClear’s Free Tool “Open” Finds Vulnerabilities In Your Open Source Code [Ed: It’s not free (libre), it’s not open, and it’s Microsoft-connected FUD]
  • Microsoft Rolls Out .NET Core RC2, .NET Core SDK Preview 1 With Linux Support [Ed: core means Open Core, more or less]
  • HSA IL Front-End Proposed For GCC

    HSA stakeholders are hoping to mainline their HSA IL front-end for the GCC compiler stack. In particular, BRIG, the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language.

    The HSA Foundation has been maintaining their repository with the HSA IL front-end on top of GCC 4.9 while now the developers are hoping to see this code mainlined. The development appears to be done primarily by Parmance, a company specializing in parallel performance engineering.

  • Global Geographic Information System (GIS) Market - Growing Demand of Open-Source GIS Software a Key Market Restraint - Research and Markets
  • Can Open Source Hardware Crack Semiconductor Industry Economics?

    The running joke is that when a headline begs a question, the answer is, quite simply, “No.” However, when the question is multi-layered, wrought with dependencies that stretch across an entire supply chain, user bases, and device range, and across companies in the throes of their own economic and production uncertainties, a much more nuanced answer is required.

    Although Moore’s Law is not technically dead yet, organizations from the IEEE to individual device makers are already thinking their way out of a box that has held the semiconductor industry neatly for decades. However, it turns out, that thought process is complicated just as much by technical challenges as it is by economic barriers.

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TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 10:04:02 AM
  • Security will fix itself, eventually

    Here's my prediction though. In the future, good security will be cheaper to build, deploy, and run that bad security. This sounds completely insane with today's technology. A statement like is some kook ten years ago telling everyone solar power is our future. Ten years ago solar wasn't a serious thing, today it is. Our challenge is figuring out what the new security future will look like. We don't really know yet. We know we can't train our way out of this, most existing technology is a band-aid at best. If I had to guess I'll use the worn out "Artificial Intelligence will save us all", but who knows what the future will bring. Thanks to Al Gore, I'm now more optimistic things will get better. I'm impatient though, I don't want to wait for the future, I want it now! So all you smart folks do me a favor and start inventing the future.

  • Does Microsoft care about security? [Ed: no, because leaks show it gives back doors to governments]

    On Wednesday, I also booted my laptop to Windows. I had not used the laptop for several days, so the AV definitions were three days old. It updated after around 3 hours. But the Vista system still has not updated.

    This is the third consecutive month when I have had problems with updating MSE, at around the time of patch Tuesday. The previous two months, I attempted to manually update. On the manual update, it did a search for virus updates, then seemed to hang there forever not actually downloading. It did eventually update, after repeating this for two days. This month, I decided to allow it to update without manual intervention, with the results described above.

    It seems pretty obvious that, recently, Microsoft has worsened the priority for updates to Windows 7 and to Vista. The priority worsening is greater for Vista than for Windows 7. It affects monthly patches as well as MSE virus table updates.

    The message to malware producers is loud and clear. Malware producers should distribute their malware on patch Tuesday, and Microsoft will give them a free run for several days.

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LXer: Apache incubating project promises new Internet security framework

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 09:07:44 AM
A new incubating project at the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) promises a more secure Internet that doesn't require monolithic trust hierarchies and centralized certificate authorities. And it could eliminate the need for complex passwords, too.

TuxMachines: KWayland joined KDE Frameworks

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 08:51:43 AM

The current release 5.22 of KDE Frameworks gained a new framework: KWayland. So far KWayland got released together with Plasma. KWayland entered as tier 1/integration and is only available on Linux (and other Linux-like systems).

For us working on the Wayland stack in Plasma and KDE this is a very important step. Now we can use KWayland also in other frameworks. Also with KWayland in frameworks we expose it to a larger audience. We hope that it is a useful framework for anyone using Wayland with Qt. It’s not a replacement for QtWayland, rather an addition and way more flexible by being closer to the Wayland API.

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TuxMachines: Sweden’s insurer: open source maximises IT efficiency

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 08:44:26 AM

Open source’s inherent flexibility maximises IT value, says Mikael Norberg, CTO at Sweden’s Social Insurance Agency (Försäkringskassan). Thanks to free software licences, information technology can be used effectively. Last year, Försäkringskassan completed its transition to open source in its data centre in Sundsvall, “driving down costs while increasing IT value”, the CTO says.

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TuxMachines: End of Apple, maddog Recovering, PCLOS Drops 32-bit

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 08:43:46 AM

Top new today in the Linux world is the recovery of Jon "maddog" Hall. Hall, a staunch supporter of Linux and Open Source, recently suffered a heart attack and is now recovering comfortably at home. PCLinuxOS announced the end of the 32-bit versions and Dimstar blogged the latest in Tumbleweed. Elsewhere, Paul Venezia said Apple is on the ropes and Neil Rickert said Microsoft clearly doesn't even care about security.

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TuxMachines: Phoronix on Kernel

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 08:38:30 AM

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TuxMachines: CoreOS Fest Showcases New Projects to Advance Containers

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 08:31:09 AM

CoreOS held its second annual CoreOS Fest event May 9-10 in Berlin, with a satellite event simulcast in San Francisco. CoreOS originally got its start in 2013 as an optimized delivery platform for Docker containers but has evolved to become one of Docker Inc.'s primary rivals, building out its own rkt container runtime. CoreOS also has become a leading contributor to the Kubernetes open-source container orchestration platform, originally built by Google. CoreOS' commercial tectonic platform is a fully supported Kubernetes distribution that aims to provide organizations with a Google Infrastructure for Everyone Else (GIFEE) platform. At CoreOS Fest, the company announced a new $28 million round of funding to help advance its technologies and marketing efforts. Also at the event, Tigera, a new company that will oversee the commercialization of the Canal open-source effort, officially launched. Zachary Smith, CEO of Packet, used his time on the CoreOS Fest stage to detail how his cloud hosting company is enabling trusted cloud computing on a bare metal platform. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the CoreOS Fest event.

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TuxMachines: Linux ZFS Compatibility

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 08:26:18 AM
  • ZFS comes to Debian, thanks to licensing workaround

    The ZFS file system has come to popular Linux distribution Debian, but in a way the distro's backers think won't kick up another row over compatibility of open source licences.

    Ubuntu 16.04 added ZFS, despite pre-release grumblings from Richard Stallman to the effect that anything licensed under the GNU GPL v2 can only be accompanied by code also released under the GNU GPL v2. ZFS is issued under a Common Development and Distribution License, version 1 (CDDLv1).

  • Skirting The Hole In The Ice Of ZFS

    The muddy part is how building and running a ZFS module with Linux is not a violation of copyright when a combined derivative work of Linux+ZFS is created. Making even one copy is probably a violation of both CDDL and GPL., so keep on skating.

  • What does it mean that ZFS is included in Debian?

    Petter Reinholdtsen recently blogged about ZFS availability in Debian. Many people have worked hard on getting ZFS support available in Debian and we would like to thank everyone involved in getting to this point and explain what ZFS in Debian means.

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LXer: New Arduino Srl SBC merges Arduino, WiFi, and Linux

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 05:59:02 AM
Arduino Srl’s new “Arduino Industrial 101” SBC includes Arduino circuitry and I/O, along with a soldered-on WiFi module that runs Linino Linux.

LXer: Linus Torvalds Ships "Fairly Big" Linux Kernel 4.6 Release

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 04:56:08 AM
Linus Torvalds yesterday released the final code for version 4.6 of the Linux kernel. This release comes two months after the previous 4.5 version and has gone through seven release candidates. “The 4.6 kernel on the whole was a fairly big release - more commits than we've had in a while,” Torvalds wrote in his release notes on the LKML mailing list. “But it all felt fairly calm despite that.”

LXer: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Receives Minor Kernel Update That Patches Two Vulnerabilities

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 03:53:14 AM
Canonical published multiple security notices to inform the Ubuntu community about the availability of a new kernel update for their operating systems.

Reddit: Wine-like program for Mac?

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 03:30:31 AM

I'm thinking of making the switch to Linux but have a few Mac apps that I want to keep around. Is there a Wine equivalent on Linux that will somewhat let me use Mac apps?

submitted by /u/photoaz85
[link] [comments]

LXer: Uruk 1.0 Screenshot Tour

Tuesday 17th of May 2016 02:50:20 AM
Uruk 1.0 is available. Uruk GNU/Linux is a distribution of the GNU operating system, with the Linux-libre kernel. The distribution is based on Trisquel GNU/Linux.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers
    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.
  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library
    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements. The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.
  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code
    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.
  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid
    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.
  • vcswatch is now looking for tags
    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories. Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

Google and Oracle

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers (Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium”, Regulation)

  • Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium” — Best Kali Linux Alternative Coming With New Features
    The Release Candidate of Parrot Security OS 3.0 ‘Lithium’ is now available for download. The much-anticipated final release will come in six different editions with the addition of Libre, LXDE, and Studio editions. The version 3.0 of this Kali Linux alternative is based on Debian Jessie and powered by custom hardened Linux 4.5 kernel.
  • Regulation can fix security, except you can't regulate security
    Every time I start a discussion about how we can solve some of our security problems it seems like the topics of professional organizations and regulation are where things end up. I think regulations and professional organizations can fix a lot of problems in an industry, I'm not sure they work for security. First let's talk about why regulation usually works, then, why it won't work for security.